Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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GLOSSARY


This glossary provides definitions for terms and concepts used on the Federal Register of Legislation (the Legislation Register).

For suggestions of additional terms or concepts to be included in the glossary please contact us.


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1st, 2nd and 3rd reading see readings (of a Bill)

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Act

An Act is a statute or law passed by both Houses of Parliament that has received Royal Assent. On Royal Assent, Acts are given a year and number. Once an Act is formally enacted it can generally only be amended or repealed by another Act. When an Act changes, a compilation of the Act is prepared to show the Act as amended. Acts are also known as primary legislation.

Administrative Arrangements Orders (AAOs)

The Administrative Arrangements Order or AAO is a document made by the Governor-General. It sets out the matters and Acts dealt with by each Departments of State and its Minister(s). AAOs are not legislative instruments and are published by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet This link will take you away from the Legislation Register. Copies of almost all AAOs published since 1901 can be found on the Legislation Register.

AAOs on Legislation Register

Administrator of the Commonwealth

The Administrator of the Commonwealth is the person authorised by the Constitution to handle certain matters in the absence, death, incapacity, removal or resignation of the Governor-General. By convention the longest serving State Governor is generally appointed as Administrator.

agency

An agency can be an Australian Government Department of State, another type of Australian Government bodiy, or a State government body.

For more information about the structure, organisations and key people in an agency or portfolio, go to the Government Online Directory This link will take you away from the Legislation Register.

amending legislation

Amending legislation is legislation that primarily amends or makes changes to other legislation. The changes may affect a few words, replace entire sections or repeal a complete piece of legislation. It is generally easy to recognise amending legislation from the title, which will usually include the word “Amendment” or “Amending”. An exception to this is that occasionally principal legislation may also amend (including repeal and revoke) other legislation. Amending legislation may include application, savings or transitional provisions. If amending instruments include these types of provisions, the instrument is not regarded as solely amending for the purposes of automatic repeal.

amendment

An amendment is a change to the law generally made by another law. An amendment can change or repeal an existing provision, or add a new provision.

amendment history

In the endnotes of a compilation, the amendment history lists the amendments that have been incorporated into the law and details how the text of the law was affected. Any unincorporated amendments known at the time of publication will be underlined in the history to indicate that the amendment has a future commencement.

application provision

An application provision sets out situations or timeframes in which a law applies or does not apply.

applied law

The Australian Government administers the Ashmore and Cartier Islands, Christmas Island, the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, the Coral Sea Islands, the Jervis Bay Territory, the Heard and McDonald Islands and the Australian Antarctic. The Australian Government legislates for these Territories and for some of these Territories applies the laws of a nearby State. The State laws, as applied to a Territory, may be modified, suspended from operating or repealed by Ordinance.

as made

As made legislation is legislation in the form in which it was originally made. The text may not reflect in force as it will not include any later amendments that may have been made.

Assent see Royal Assent.

authorised version

The Legislation Register contains authorised or authoritative versions of Acts, legislative instruments, notifiable instruments, explanatory statements for legislative instruments and compilations of Acts, legislative instruments and notifiable instruments. An authorised version is always in a pdf file format and can be identified by the words ‘Authorised version’, ‘ComLaw Authoritative Act’, ‘Federal Register of Legislative Instruments’ or ‘Explanatory Statement to…[unique identifier of the instrument it relates to]’ on the electronic or printed copy. An authorised version is taken to be a reliable source of information by a court or tribunal unless proven to the contrary.

authoritative version see authorised version

automatic repeal

If a provision or the whole of a legislative or notifiable instrument has the sole effect of amending, repealing or commencing another legislative or notifiable instrument, the instrument or provision is automatically repealed as soon as it has operated in full (see Chapter 3, Part 3, Division 1 of the Legislation Act 2003).

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Bill

A Bill is a draft Act of Parliament. Under Australia’s Constitution, a Bill may be introduced in either House of Parliament with the exception of a supply or money Bill which must be introduced in the House of Representatives. Depending on who introduced them, Bills may be referred to as:

Bills as introduced from 1996 are available on the Legislation Register. More information about Bills, including information about their passage through Parliament, can be found on the Bills and Legislation page This link will take you away from the Legislation Register of the Parliament of Australia website.

Details of the originating Bill for an Act are found on the details page for the Act as made.

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cease/cease to have effect

Legislation that may not have been formally repealed but has otherwise ceased to be in force.

commencement

The commencement of a law is the time/date at which a law comes come into force. Different parts of a law may come into force at different times.

commencement instrument

Commencement instruments are instruments that proclaim the commencement of another piece of legislation. From March 2016 onwards an instrument that has the sole effect of commencing a registered law (a commencement instrument) must in all cases be lodged for registration as a notifiable instrument under s 4 and 11(2)(a) of the Legislation Act 2003. Commencement instruments made between 2005 and 2016 were generally published as legislative instruments. Before 2005 many Act proclamations were published in the Gazette.

Commencement instruments | Commencement instruments (Legislative Instruments)

Commonwealth reserved law

Following passage of the Australian Capital Territory (Self-Government) Act 1988, the Governor-General retained the power under section 12 of the Seat of Government (Administration) Act 1910 , to make laws (known as ordinances) on a narrow range of topics e.g. classification of materials for censorship, land used or intended to be used for Commonwealth purposes (national land) and companies. Commonwealth reserved laws which continue to apply in the ACT can be found on the Legislation Register under Ordinances/Australian Capital Territory.

compilation

A compilation is a version of a law that shows the text of the law as amended at a particular point-in-time. The compilation number, compilation date and information to indicate which amendments have been incorporated in the compilation can be found on the front page of the compilation and in the endnotes.

compilation date

The compilation date is the date from which the text of the law shown in the compilation applies.

compilation number

The compilation number is a version number for the compilation and is based on how many compilations have already been published of that title.

Constitution, The

The Australian Constitution was drafted at two conventions in the 1890s, and approved by the people of the colonies of Australia at a series of referendums between 1898 and 1900. It was passed as an Act of the British Parliament and received Royal Assent from Queen Victoria on 9 July 1900.

When the Commonwealth of Australia Act, commenced on 1 January 1901, it established the Australian Government and gave the Australian Parliament the power to make laws on certain matters (mostly listed in sections 51 and 52). The six colonies became Australia’s six states, and have the power to make laws on a much wider range of matters. However, if a valid Commonwealth law is inconsistent with the law of a State, then the Commonwealth law overrides the State law. The Constitution also establishes the Queen as a part of the Parliament (section 1), and allows her powers to be exercised by the Governor-General (section 61).

Constitution

correction

Any mistakes, omissions or other errors on the Legislation Register must be corrected as soon as possible and must include a statement about the correction (see section 15D of the Legislation Act 2003). If a correction is made to a document, both the original and corrected document will be available on the Legislation Register. Corrections were previously known as rectifications.

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delegated legislation see secondary legislation

Department (of State)

A references within the law to a Department means the Australian Government department whose Minister administers the matter to which the reference relates. This principle is set out in the Acts Interpretation Act 1901 (ss19A(3)). A list of the departments in existence at various times can be found in the Administrative Arrangements Orders.The AAOs are published by the Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet This link will take you away from the Legislation Register and copies of most AAOs can be found on the Legislation Register.

disallowable instruments

Disallowable instruments are instruments that must be tabled and are open to Parliamentary veto or disallowance for a set period, usually fifteen sitting days. All new legislative instruments are subject to disallowance unless they have been granted an exemption.

disallowance

Disallowance is a form of repeal of disallowable instruments initiated by the Parliament. The Parliament, with a majority vote in either House of the Parliament, may disallow a disallowable instrument in part or in full. This may result in an instrument ceasing to have effect and reviving an earlier instrument. If an instrument is disallowed, generally the rule maker may not make an instrument similar in substance for 6 months.

See repeal

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editorial changes

An editorial change is an editorial or presentational change made under section 15V of the Legislation Act 2003, to a compilation of the law prepared for registration by the First Parliamentary Counsel. The changes must not change the effect of the law. Details of any editorial changes are included in the compilation endnotes.

enabling legislation

Enabling legislation is any law that enables, authorises or delegates somebody else to make additional laws on relevant details. The most common form of enabling legislation is an Act of Parliament.

end notes

Endnotes are found towards the end of a compilation and provide information about the compilation. A typical endnote will include an abbreviation key, legislation history and amendment history. Additional information about other matters such as any editorial changes, misdescribed amendments and application, savings or transitional provisions are included in the endnotes when required.

Executive Council see Federal Executive Council.

explanatory material

Explanatory material is material which is prepared as a law is developed, to explain how it is expected to operate. A court may use this and other 'extrinsic' material to interpret what a law means if it is unclear under section 15AB of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901.

The Federal Register contains a range of explanatory material including explanatory memorandums, some reading speeches, explanatory statements and some regulatory impact statements. However, the Federal Register does not have all the material that a court may take into account in interpreting a particular law, such as press releases.

Explanatory Memorandum (EM)

An explanatory memorandum or EM is a document that sets out how a Bill is expected to operate and details about individual provisions. The EM focuses on the Bill as it was when introduced to the Parliament, and will not pick up changes made to the Bill after introduction. If Parliamentary amendments to the bill are made, a supplementary EM may be issued. Copies of initial EMs, but not necessarily supplementary EMs, from 1996 onwards are available on the Legislation Register on the relevant Bill’s home page. Information on the progress of Bills, amendments to them and copies of associated explanatory memoranda are available on the Parliament of Australia website This link will take you away from the Legislation Register

Explanatory Statement (ES)

An explanatory statement or ES is a document that sets out how a legislative instrument is expected to operate and details about individual provisions. There are 3 types of explanatory statements:

  • an initial explanatory statement—a statement for the instrument as it was made as approved by the rule-maker;
  • a replacement explanatory statement—a statement to replace the initial explanatory statement to correct errors and approved by the rule-maker; and
  • a supplementary explanatory statement—a statement to amend an initial or replacement explanatory statement and approved by the rule-maker.

ESs for all legislative instruments made since 1 January 2005, and for some older documents, are available on the relevant legislative instrument’s home page on the Legislation Register.

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Federal Executive Council

The Federal Executive Council is established by the Constitution to advise the Governor-General. For more information see the Federal Executive Council Handbook This link will take you away from the Legislation Register published by the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.

Federal Register of Legislation (Federal Register)

The Federal Register of Legislation (Legislation Register) is a database or permanent repository of versions (including authorised versions) of Acts, legislative instruments, notifiable instruments and compilations of Acts and instruments together with associated documents and information including explanatory statements and Gazette notices. It is established under section 15A of the Legislation Act 2003 .

first reading see readings.

future law compilation

A future law compilation is a compilation that shows the text of an amended law as it is expected to read in the future. It is not an authorised version, and further changes may be proposed and made to the law before the expected amendments commence. Future law compilations are only published in special circumstances.

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Government Gazette

Government Gazette notices concerning legislation, and other notices required by Commonwealth law to be published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, are published on the Legislation Register. A number of other specialist gazettes are published by other Australian Government agencies. Specialist gazettes may be published at varying intervals, may overlap with notices published on the Legislation Register or may publish material not available on the Legislation Register. The following specialist gazettes are currently available:

Gazette name Frequency Published by
Australian Pesticides and Veterinary Medicine Authority (APVMA) Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Monthly APVMA
Australian Public Service (APS) Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Weekly Australian Public Service Commission
Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Twice weekly ASIC
Business Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Weekly ASIC
Chemical Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Monthly Department of Health
Food Standards Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Periodically Food Standards Australia and New Zealand
Indian Ocean Territories Government Gazette This link will take you away from ComLaw
(replaces the Christmas Island Gazette and the Cocos (Keeling) Islands Gazette)
Intermittent Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development
Purchasing and Disposals Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register
(now a part of the AusTender website)
not applicable Department of Finance
Tariff Concessions Gazette This link will take you away from ComLaw Weekly Customs
Unclaimed Monies Gazette This link will take you away from the Legislation Register Intermittent* ASIC

*Often included with the ASIC gazette

Government Notices Gazettes (including Periodic and Special) published between 1 July 2002 and 1 October 2012 are available in PDF format on the Legislation Register under Historic Gazettes. From 1 October 2012 onwards the Gazette has been published in electronic format only as individually searchable notices. Government Gazettes published before 1 July 2002 are not currently available electronically but printed copies are available at State Libraries throughout Australia or the National Library in Canberra. State and Territory Governments Gazettes are published on the relevant State or Territory government website.

Gazettes | Historic Gazettes

Governor-General

As the Queen’s representative in Australia, the Governor-General performs a large number of functions under Australia’s Constitution. The Governor-General generally acts in accordance with advice received from Commonwealth Ministers through the Federal Executive Council, although the Governor-General does not have to do so when it comes to some powers.

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in force

In force legislation is legislation that is on the statute book and has the force of law. On the Legislation Register, legislation that has been made but not yet commenced is also displayed in the in force listings. In force law does not include draft legislation such as Bills, repealed legislation or legislation that may not have been formally repealed but has otherwise ceased to be in force.

item page

On the Legislation Register, an item page displays and details information about a specific version of legislation, rather than showing the series of legislation as it changes over time.

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legislation

Legislation consists of Acts of Parliament and the secondary legislation made under them. The term legislation can refer to a single law or to a collection of laws.

legislation history

In the endnotes of a compilation, the legislation history lists all the legislation that has amended the text of the principal legislation. Details of what has or has not been incorporated into the text will usually be set out in the amendment history.

legislative instruments (LIs)

Legislative instruments are laws on matters of detail made by a person or body authorised to do so by the relevant enabling legislation. Examples of LIs include regulations, rules and determinations. Under the Legislation Act 2003, all legislative instruments must be registered on the Legislation Register

The Legislation Register contains authorised versions of every legislative instrument made since 1 January 2005 and every instrument made before then but still in force on 1 January 2008.

legislation tables

The legislation tables contain information about legislation that allows users to track the history of Acts and some other instruments.

legislation tables

letters patent

There are two very different kinds of instrument that are known as letters patent. One is an ancient form of instrument made without reference to the Parliament under royal prerogative, that is, a prerogative instruments. Copies of recent prerogative instruments are available on the Legislation Register. The other type of instruments are patents which are now governed by the Patents Act 1990. A comprehensive database of Australian patents granted since 1904 is maintained by IP Australia This link will take you away from the Legislation Register.

long title see title

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making

Making is the process by which a rule-maker signs, seals of otherwise endorses a new law. Where the Governor-General Governor-General endorses an Act passed by the Australian Parliament, this process is referred to as Royal Assent.

Minister

References within a law to a Minister means the Minister or Ministers responsible for administering the law unless stated otherwise. This principle is set out in the Acts Interpretation Act 1901 (subsection 19A(1)).

Misdescribed amendment

A misdescribed amendment is an amendment that does not accurately describe how an amendment is to be made. If, despite the misdescription, the amendment can be given effect as intended, the amendment is incorporated into the compiled law and the abbreviation “(md)” added to the details of the amendment included in the amendment history in the endnotes to the relevant compilation. If however a misdescribed amendment cannot be given effect as intended, the amendment is not incorporated and “(md not incorp)” is added to the amendment history.

modification

A modification is an alteration to the text of a law that is not permanent or only applies to particular locations or cases. Modifications have effect as if they were amendments, but do not actually amend. It is quite possible for a number of modifications, inconsistent with one another, to be applied to the same provision for various different cases. Modifications are not compiled into the principal legislation. For more information on any modifications, see the series page on the Legislation Register.

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no longer in force

When legislation ceases to have effect the legislation is no longer in force. Legislation may not have been formally repealed but still may no longer be in force. In force law does not include draft legislation such as Bills, repealed legislation or legislation that may not have been formally repealed but has otherwise ceased to be in force.

notes see endnotes

notifiable instruments

Notifiable instruments are laws on matters of detail made by a person or body authorised to do so by enabling legislation. Under the Legislation Act 2003 all notifiable instruments and their compilations must be registered on the Legislation Register. An instrument that has the sole effect of commencing a registered law (a commencement instrument) must in all cases be lodged for registration as a notifiable instrument (Legislation Act 2003, s 4 and 11(2)(a)). This also applies to any instrument that announces the day that an international agreement enters into force for Australia, regardless of whether the treaty itself is ever registered (LEOMR s 8(1)).

Unlike legislative instruments, notifiable instruments are not subject to Parliamentary disallowance disallowance and do not automatically sunset 10 years after commencement. Notifiable instruments are subject to automatic repeal if they solely provide for the amendment, repeal or commencement of Acts or other instruments. The Legislation Register contains authorised versions of notifiable instrument made since March 2016.

numbered laws

Some types of law such as Acts of Parliament are issued with a unique number as part of their making and they may be referred to by this number instead of by name (see subparagraph 40(1A)(a)(ii) of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901).

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ordinances

An ordinance is a form of delegated legislation which usually applies only in a certain local area. Some Commonwealth ordinances are classified as legislative instruments, meaning they are published on the Legislation Register as an authorised version.

For non-self-governing territories see theAustralia's Territories page to locate all legislation relevant to a given territory including ordinances, by-laws, regulations and Acts.

Australia's Territories

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perfect bound

Perfect binding is a widely used soft cover book binding method. With this binding method, the pages and cover are glued together at the spine with a strong yet flexible thermal glue. The other three sides of the book are then trimmed as needed to give them clean “perfect” edges.

point-in-time

A point-in-time version sets out the law at a particular point in time. As amendments are made to the law new versions of the law are compiled and published. Point-in-time legislation allows users to access a version of the law as it appeared at a particular point in the past. Users of the Legislation Register should use the start date and end date found on the series home page to help them to select the particular version they require.

Information about any retrospective amendments can be found on the series page of a compilation title and on the item page for the affected compilation.

preamble

A preamble sets out the reasons for and scope of a law. This information may also be found in a law’s explanatory material.

prepared date

Some older compilations may contain a prepared date. The prepared date relates to when the compilation was prepared. It does not relate to the date it was registered or the point in time that the compilation reflects the amended law. The date a compilation was prepared was required to be included on registered compilations until 5 March 2016.

prerogative instruments

Prerogative instruments are an ancient form of law making inherited from England and are instruments made by the Governor-General or monarch without reference to Parliament under the royal prerogative which is that power of the Crown still existing and not superseded by parliamentary legislation.

Prerogative instruments include instruments which establish national honours such as the Order of Australia, and the procedures for granting them. These instruments are usually published in the gazette and most recent ones are also available on the Legislation Register. They are sometimes called letters patent.

Prerogative instruments

primary legislation

Acts of Parliament are sometimes referred to as primary legislation. Acts can authorise a person or body other than the Parliament to make laws on matters of detail, that is, secondary legislation.

principal legislation

Principal legislation, as opposed to amending legislation, is the legislation that deals with a particular topic or area of the law. Whilst principal legislation may amend other legislation, its primary job is to set out new law rather than amend other laws.

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readers guide

A readers guide generally provides information about how a law is organised and is related to other laws. This information may also be found in a law’s explanatory material.

readings

As a Bill passes through the Parliament, it is ‘read’ to each House at least three times. The first and third readings usually involve a parliamentary Clerk reading the Bill’s long title. The second reading is the most significant, in that the Member or Senator responsible for introducing the Bill gives a speech about what the Bill will do and why it is important. There may also be some debate, and debate may continue even after the third reading.

Bills as introduced (the first reading version) from 1996 are available on the Legislation Register. As with explanatory memoranda, the first reading relates to the Bill as it was when introduced, and will not include changes. Additional documents and information about Bills and their passage through Parliament can be found on the Bills and Legislation page This link will take you away from the Legislation Register of the Parliament of Australia website.

rectification see correction

registered

An item is registered when it is published on the Legislation Register for the first time, regardless of whether or when it has been published previously. Registered has a particular meaning for legislative instruments and notifiable instruments, see the Legislation Act 2003.

registered law

Registered law is defined under section 15Z of the Legislation Act 2003 and includes Acts, legislative instruments and notifiable instruments, and compilations of Acts, legislative instruments and notifiable instruments, registered on the Legislation Register.

Regulations

Most Regulations are made under an Act of Parliament and are classified as legislative instruments. Some prerogative instruments also have the word Regulations in their title. Regulations were part of the Statutory Rules series until 2005, and the Select Legislative Instrument series until 2015.

Regulations classified as legislative instruments | Prerogative instruments

Regulatory Impact Statement (RIS)

A RIS is a document prepared by the department, agency, statutory authority or board responsible for a regulatory policy proposal that formalises and provides evidence of the key steps taken during the development of the proposal, and includes an assessment of the costs and benefits of each option. They are routinely published on the Legislation Register with the legislation they relate to but may also be published earlier in the law-making process. These earlier RISs, and guidance on preparing a RIS, is available from the Best Practice Regulation This link will take you away from the Legislation Register website .

repeal

A repeal is the removal of a law or provision of that law from the statute book. If a provision is repealed, a new compilation will be prepared to remove the provision. A law that has been repealed will display on the Legislation Register as no longer in force.

rescission

An instrument that has been disallowed by a House of the Parliament may not be remade within six months of the disallowance unless the disallowing House has rescinded or cancelled the disallowance motion.

responsible person

For an Act, the responsible person is the Minister currently responsible for administering an Act or provision of an Act. For an instrument, the responsible person is the rule maker for the instrument. The responsible person has specific obligations under the Legislation Act 2003.

Royal Assent

A Bill passed by the Australian Parliament does not become an Act until it is formally accepted by the Governor-General. This particular process for making laws is referred to as Royal Assent.

rule-maker

The rule-maker is generally a person or body who is authorised to make a law. The rule-maker has specific obligations under the Legislation Act 2003 (see section 6).

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savings provision

A saving provision allows some or all of a repealed law to remain in force under specific circumstances. When large-scale changes to the law are proposed, savings provisions are sometimes enacted into a separate law such as a Consequential and Transitional Provisions Act. If a law is affected by a saving provision this will usually be noted in the endnotes.

secondary legislation

Secondary legislation, also referred to as delegated or subordinate legislation, is legislation enabled or authorised by primary legislation (generally an Act of Parliament).

second reading see readings (of a Bill)

Select legislative instruments (SLIs) [2005-2015]

The Select Legislative Instrument Series was a numbering series applied to instruments made by the Governor-General that consisted mostly of Regulations and Rules of Court. This series started after the repeal of the Statutory Rules Publication Act 1903 on 1 January 2005. SLIs were available on the Legislation Register up to the end of 2015 after which time SLI numbering was ceased.

Legislative instruments classified as select legislative instruments

series page

On the Legislation Register, a series page summarises how each law has changed over time and shows its relationship with other laws. For example, if a law has been amended, a list of compilations of the law as in force at different points in time can be seen on the Compilations tab, and details of individual amendments as made can be seen on the Principal + Amendments tab. If a legislative instrument legislative instrument or recent (2012+) gazette notice has been issued under the law and published by OPC, it will be listed on the Enables tab. If the law originates in or is named in a recent (1996+) Bill the details are available on the Related Bills tab.

short title see title

statutes

A statute is another term for a law, legislation or a collection of legislation. The statute book is generally a reference to all legislation that is in force at a particular point in time.

Statutory Rules [1904-2004]

Statutory rules or SRs included all Regulations made under an Act of Parliament, rules of court and certain other instruments required to be printed under the Statutory Rules Publication Act 1903. The Act, and therefore the Statutory Rules series, ceased on 1 January 2005. In 2005, instruments that would have been included in the Statutory Rules series were numbered in the Select Legislative Instrument (SL) series. This SL series was discontinued at the end of 2015.

subordinate legislation see secondary legislation

sunsetting

Some laws have an expiry date and they are automatically repealed or cease to have effect after that date if no action is taken. Most legislative instruments will sunset 10 years after commencement under Chapter 3, Part 4 of the of the Legislation Act 2003.

superseded

Superseded legislation on the Legislation Register consists of compilations that have been replaced by a later point-in-time version of the law. Compilations of Acts and instruments display on the series pages as a list with the document at the top being marked as in force or ceased and previous point in time versions marked as superseded.

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tabled

When documents are presented to the Australian Parliament for scrutiny, they are said to have been tabled. This term dates back to historic practices, when documents were actually placed on a table in each House of the Parliament. All legislative instruments are required to be tabled shortly after registration.

table of contents

A table of contents is a list of heading and sections, generally with page references, at the start of a piece of legislation. This list is sometimes referred to as a table of provisions.

table of provisions see table of contents

third reading see readings (of a Bill)

title

The title of a law refers to a law’s official title. If a law has both a short title and a long title, it’s best to cite it by its short title. An example of an Act’s long and short title is:

Long title: "An Act to appropriate additional money out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund for the ordinary annual services of the Government, and for related purposes"

Short title: Appropriation Act (No. 3) 2009-2010

transitional provision

A transitional provision sets out the special arrangements that apply when changes to the law are implemented over an extended period. Transitional provisions are sometimes put together into a separate law such as a Consequential and Transitional Provisions Act. If a law is affected by a transitional provision this will usually be noted in the endnotes.

treaties

A treaty is an agreement between countries (sovereign states) and some treaties involving Australia have been given force of law by including or referring to them in Acts or legislative instruments.

Treaties themselves are not required to be published on the Legislation Register, but most are available online elsewhere. For more information about the treaties to which Australia is a party, see the DFAT treaties database hosted by AustLII This link will take you away from the Legislation Register and the UN website This link will take you away from the Legislation Register.

Any instrument that announces the day that an international agreement enters into force for Australia, regardless of whether the treaty itself is ever registered must in all cases be lodged for registration as a notifiable instrument under s 8(1) of the Legislation (Exemptions and Other Matters) Regulation 2015.

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unincorporated amendment

An unincorporated amendment is an amendment that has not been incorporated into a compilation of the law. An amendment will not be incorporated if the amendment has not yet commenced (unless it is a future law compilation) or if the amendment was misdescribed and cannot be done. The Legislation Register series page of the compilation and endnotes in the compilation itself will identify any unincorporated amendments.