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Part 66 Manual of Standards

Authoritative Version
Standards/Other as amended, taking into account amendments up to Part 66 Manual of Standards Amendment Instrument 2021 (No. 2)
Administered by: Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development, Communications and the Arts
Registered 06 Jan 2022
Start Date 05 Jan 2022
Table of contents.

Part 66 Manual of Standards (MOS) (as amended)

made under regulation 66.015 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998.

This compilation was prepared on 5 January 2022 taking into account amendments up to Part 66 Manual of Standards Amendment Instrument 2021 (No. 2). It is a compilation of the Part 66 Manual of Standards (MOS), as amended and in force on 5 January 2022.

Prepared by the Advisory and Drafting Branch, Legal, International and Regulatory Affairs Division, Civil Aviation Safety Authority, Canberra.

Compilation No. 22

Contents

Page

Part 1........ Preliminary....................................................................................................... 2

66.1A........ Name of instrument............................................................................................ 2

66.1........... Scope................................................................................................................ 2

66.5........... Definitions......................................................................................................... 2

66.6.......... Meaning of hold, or obtain, a unit of competency................................................ 5

66.A.1....... Aircraft engineer licence...................................................................................... 5

Part 2........ Aircraft engineer licences for type-rated aircraft etc........................................... 5

66.A.4....... Certain type-rated aircraft types and endorsements etc......................................... 5

66.A.10...... Application — form............................................................................................ 6

66.A.20...... Privileges........................................................................................................... 6

66.A.21...... Transitional privileges........................................................................................ 13

66.A.23...... Requalification requirements.............................................................................. 14

66.A.25...... Basic knowledge and competency requirements................................................. 15

66.A.30...... Basic practical experience requirements............................................................. 16

66.A.45...... Type/task training and ratings............................................................................ 19

66.A.50...... Aircraft type practical training............................................................................ 22

66.A.55...... On the Job aircraft type Training........................................................................ 22

66.A.56...... Use of CAR 31 for removal of exclusion from a Part 66 licence on or after
27 June 2015....................................................................................................
23

66.A.57...... Use of CAR 31 for removal of exclusion from a Part 66 rating on or after
27 June 2015....................................................................................................
23

66.A.58...... Exemptions to facilitate the operation of certain provisions................................ 23

66.A.60...... Recognised States........................................................................................... 24

66.A.65...... Excluded States............................................................................................... 24

66.A.70...... Limitations........................................................................................................ 24

Part 3........ Transitional provisions.................................................................................... 24

66.A.100.... Transitional provision for Part 66 Manual of Standards Amendment
Instrument 2018 (No. 1)
.....................................................................................
24

                  Appendix I........................................................................................................ 26

                  Appendix II....................................................................................................... 88

                  Appendix III...................................................................................................... 92

                  Appendix IV.................................................................................................... 105

                  Appendix V.................................................................................................... 113

                  Appendix VI.................................................................................................... 114

                  Appendix VII................................................................................................... 115

                  Appendix VIII.................................................................................................. 116

                  Appendix IX.................................................................................................... 122

                  Note to Part 66 Manual of Standards (MOS)..................................................... 149

Part 1       Preliminary

66.1A        Name of instrument

                 This instrument is the Part 66 Manual of Standards (MOS).

66.1           Scope

        (a)     This is the MOS for Part 66 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR 1998).

        (b)     This MOS sets out the requirements for the issue of an aircraft engineer licence and other requirements or privileges associated with the licence.

66.5           Definitions

     (a)     Unless otherwise defined in this MOS, words and phrases have the same meaning as in Part 66 of CASR 1998.

        (b)     In this MOS:

AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 means the CASA publication titled Acceptable Means of Compliance (AMC) and Guidance Material (GM) CASR Part 66, as existing from time to time.

AME licence means an aircraft maintenance engineer (AME) licence under regulation 31 of CAR 1988 as in force immediately before 27 June 2011.

APU means auxiliary power unit.

ATA means Air Transport Association of America.

Note   ATA is a publication referencing standard, commonly used for all commercial aircraft documentation.

avionic LRU, or avionic line replaceable unit, is an aircraft avionic part that satisfies all of the following requirements:

1.     it must have no mechanical input from, or output to, another part or mechanism;

2.     it must contain only electrical, electronic, instrument or radio parts, or software, or a combination of any such part or parts and software, designed to provide control, monitor or display functions, or a combination of such functions;

3.     it must not require any of the following in order to be installed, secured or connected to the aircraft:

             (i)  specialist knowledge or techniques;

            (ii)  specialised equipment;

           (iii)  rigging, or functional testing or adjustment, using specialised equipment external to the aircraft or brought on board the aircraft, to ensure that it is functioning properly.

avionic system means an aircraft system, as specified in Table 1 in section 66.A.20, which transfers, processes, displays or stores analogue or digital data, using data lines, data buses, coaxial cables, or wireless or other data transmission media, and includes the system’s components and connectors.

Note   The following are examples of avionic systems:

1.       auto flight;

2.       communication, radar and navigation;

3.       instruments;

4.       in-flight entertainment systems;

5.       integrated modular avionics (IMA);

6.       cabin systems;

7.       on-board maintenance systems;

8.       information systems;

9.       fly-by-wire systems (related to flight control systems (ATA27));

10.    fibre-optic control systems.

CAR 1988, or CAR, means the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988.

CASR 1998 means the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998.

CAO means Civil Aviation Order.

cell, when mentioned for a table, means an individual, undivided unit (regardless of its size) into which a column of the table is subdivided.

COA holder means a person who holds a certificate of approval under regulation 30 of CAR 1988.

electrical system means the aircraft electrical power supply source, plus the distribution system to the different components contained in the aircraft and relevant connectors. Electrical systems are specified in Table 1 in section 66.A.20. When working on cables (including coaxial cables) and connectors which are part of these electrical systems, the following typical practices are included in the privileges:

1.     continuity, insulation and bonding techniques and testing;

2.     crimping and testing of crimped joints;

3.     connector pin removal and insertion;

4.     wiring protection techniques.

large aircraft has the same meaning as in the CASR Dictionary.

lighting systems are part of the electrical system.

MEA means manufacturing and engineering assessment.

Note   MEA is part of a code assigned to each nationally endorsed Australian training package to identify the particular industry the training package covers.

MTO means maintenance training organisation under Part 147 of CASR 1998.

non-rated aircraft has the same meaning as in paragraph (b) of the definition of aircraft type in regulation 66.010 of CASR 1998.

Part 66 licence means an aircraft engineer licence issued under Part 66 of CASR 1998.

Part 66 rating means a rating on an aircraft engineer licence, issued under Part 66 of CASR 1998.

powerplant means an aircraft engine.

practical consolidation training (PCT) means a practical training course:

1.     conducted by a maintenance training organisation in accordance with section 66.A.50 and Appendix III; and

2.     that is approved in writing by CASA.

Note   In considering whether to approve a PCT course, CASA will take into account whether the course elements reflect the elements of a best practice PCT program as described in Advisory Circular 147-1 Practical Consolidation Training.

recognition of prior learning (RPL) for licence category training, aircraft type training, category A aircraft task training and foreign or military qualifications under Part 66 of CASR 1998:

(a)   has the same meaning given by section 147.A.07 of the Part 147 Manual of Standards (as amended); and

(b)   may be prescribed by CASA, a Part 147 Maintenance Training Organisation (MTO) or a Part 145 Approved Maintenance Organisation (AMO).

                 regulation 31 means paragraphs 31 (4) (b), (c) and (e) of CAR 1988, as in force immediately before 27 June 2011, and includes:

1.     regulation 31C of CAR 1988, as in force immediately before 27 June 2011; and

2.     each of the following CAOs, as in force immediately before 27 June 2011:

             (i)  CAO 100.91;

            (ii)  CAO 100.92;

           (iii)  CAO 100.93;

           (iv)  CAO 100.94;

            (v)  CAO 100.95; and

3.     each of the following Specification instruments for an associated CAO, as in force or existing immediately before 27 June 2015:

             (i)  CASA 202/14 for CAO 100.91;

            (ii)  CASA 203/14 for CAO 100.92;

           (iii)  CASA 204/14 for CAO 100.93;

           (iv)  CASA 205/14 for CAO 100.94;

            (v)  CASA 206/14 for CAO 100.95; and

4.     each of the following Airworthiness Advisory Circulars (AAC) with which its associated CAO was expressed to be read, as it existed immediately before 27 June 2015:

             (i)  AAC Part 9-91 for CAO 100.91;

            (ii)  AAC Part 9-92 for CAO 100.92;

           (iii)  AAC Part 9-93 for CAO 100.93;

           (iv)  AAC part 9-94 for CAO 100.94;

            (v)  AAC Part 9-95 for CAO 100.95.

RPL has the same meaning as in section 147.A.07 of the Part 147 Manual of Standards (as amended).

simple test means a test described in maintenance data that meets all of the following criteria:

1.     the serviceability of the system can be verified using aircraft controls, switches, built-in test equipment (BITE), central maintenance computer (CMC) or external test equipment not involving special training;

2.     the outcome of the test is a unique go/no-go indication or parameter. No interpretation of the test result or interdependence of different values is allowed.

small aircraft has the same meaning as in the CASR Dictionary.

subsystem means a system which, while capable of functioning on its own, is part of a larger system and includes, for this MOS:

1.     the electrical subsystem comprised of electrical parts, appliances and motors, within mechanical, powerplant and structural systems; or

2.     the instrument subsystem comprised of avionic systems within mechanical, powerplant and structural systems.

this MOS means the Part 66 Manual of Standards.

troubleshooting means the published approved fault isolation maintenance procedures and actions outlined in maintenance data, used as necessary in order to identify the root cause of a defect or malfunction. It may include the use of BITE or external test equipment. Troubleshooting may involve avionic LRU changes, however, it does not involve multiple avionic LRU changes in pursuit of a system fault, unless the changes are made in accordance with a published approved fault isolation maintenance procedure (e.g. Troubleshooting Manual, Fault Isolation Manual procedure).

     (c)     Unless the contrary intention appears, the term carry out maintenance includes, within its normal meaning, both the supervision of maintenance and carrying out the physical tasks of maintenance.

66.6           Meaning of hold, or obtain, a unit of competency

                 A person is taken to hold, or have obtained, a unit of competency under this MOS if an MTO:

1.     assesses the person as competent in the unit of competency; and

2.     gives the person a statement of attainment, or similar document, stating the person holds the unit of competency.

66.A.1       Aircraft engineer licence

        (a)     This MOS specifies the requirements for the issue of an aircraft engineer licence in 1 or more of the following categories:

1.     Category A;

2.     Category B1;

3.     Category B2;

4.     Category C.

   (b)     Categories A and B1 may be endorsed with the following subcategories for maintenance on combinations of aeroplanes, helicopters, turbine and piston engines:

1.     A1 and B1.1 aeroplanes turbine;

2.     A2 and B1.2 aeroplanes piston;

3.     A3 and B1.3 helicopters turbine;

4.     A4 and B1.4 helicopters piston.

Part 2      Aircraft engineer licences for type-rated aircraft etc.

66.A.4       Certain type-rated aircraft types and endorsements etc.

        (a)     Subject to paragraph (d), for paragraph 66.015 (2) (e) of CASR 1998, an aircraft type specified in a cell in column 2 of a table in Appendix IX, with a type certificate holder (if any) mentioned in the corresponding cell in column 1, and a commercial designation (if any) mentioned in the corresponding cell in column 3, is specified as a type rated aircraft type for an aircraft engineer licence in Category B1, B2 or C.

        (b)     Subject to paragraph (d), for an aircraft type specified in a cell in column 2 of a table in Appendix IX, an aircraft engineer licence in Category B1, B2 or C may be endorsed with the type-rating endorsement mentioned in the corresponding cell in column 4.

        (c)     Each mention of “Various” in a cell in column 2 of a table in Appendix IX is to be read as “A small/non-rated aircraft with the engine mentioned in the corresponding cell in column 4.”.

        (d)     If a Note referred to in a cell in column 4 of a table in Appendix IX contains the statement: “This is a rule.”, the contents of the Note have legal effect for the cell in the table as if they were contained in a paragraph of this section.

66.A.10     Application — form

                 An application for an aircraft engineer licence, or an application for a variation of an aircraft engineer licence, must be made to CASA in the form approved by CASA.

66.A.20     Privileges

        (a)     The maintenance certification and certificate of release to service privileges of each category of licence are as follows:

1.     A person who holds a Category A licence endorsed with a subcategory may perform maintenance certification for that subcategory maintenance if:

             (i)   the person carried out the maintenance; and

            (ii)   the maintenance is maintenance of a kind mentioned in Appendix II of the Part 145 MOS;

2.     A person who holds a Category A licence endorsed with a subcategory may issue a certificate of release to service for maintenance if:

             (i)   the maintenance was carried out by the person; or

            (ii)   the maintenance and its maintenance certification were carried out by another person who holds a Category A licence with the appropriate subcategory; and

           (iii)   the maintenance was maintenance of a kind mentioned in Appendix II of the Part 145 MOS; and

           (iv)   the aircraft being maintained is covered by the subcategory of licence held;

3.     A reference to maintenance in subparagraphs (a) 1 or 2 does not include:

             (i)   supervision of maintenance; or

            (ii)   for a subcategory A1 licence, maintenance of a propeller-driven aeroplane unless the subcategory A1 licence holder:

(A)    holds a B1.1 subcategory endorsement that permits the holder to perform maintenance certification on the propeller system of a propeller-driven aeroplane; or

(B)    is positively endorsed in the subcategory A1 to provide such maintenance.

4.     Subject to paragraph 66.A.45 (b), a person who holds a Category B1 licence endorsed with a subcategory may perform maintenance certification for that subcategory maintenance if:

             (i)   the person carried out the subcategory maintenance; and

            (ii)   the maintenance is any of the following:

(A)    work on an aircraft system designated in Table 1, as structural, powerplant, mechanical or electrical;

(B)    unless the licence is specifically subject to an avionics LRU exclusion, replacement of an avionic line replaceable unit that requires only simple tests to prove its serviceability;

(BA)  updating the software in an avionic system, provided that:

                          (I)   the system has a discrete test facility to confirm the success of the updating; and

                         (II)   the serviceability of any other system affected by the updating is also confirmed; and

                       (III)   only simple tests are necessary to verify the serviceability of the system and any other system affected by the updating;

(C)    category A licence tasks of a kind mentioned in Appendix II of the Part 145 MOS for the aircraft type rating or ratings held

(D)    functional checks of avionic systems that can be conducted as a simple test;

(E)    troubleshooting of avionic systems that can be conducted as a simple test;

(F)     as a daily, or manufacturer’s equivalent, inspection, or as an extended diversion time operation (EDTO) pre-flight inspection;

(G)    scheduled routine inspection of fibre-reinforced plastic composite structures — but not including an inspection in which specialised equipment is used, or in which repairs to the composite structure are carried out;

(H)    inspection using an NDT method — but only if limited to liquid penetrant inspection using aerosol-packed materials.

4A.  For sub-sub-subparagraph 66.A.20 (a) 4. (ii) (F), despite any exclusions annotated on a licence, a daily or manufacturers’ equivalent inspection also includes:

             (i)   check of the condition and security of attachment of wiring, plumbing, parts and appliances; and

            (ii)   maintenance of instrument, or electrical, parts and appliances forming part of the powerplant, mechanical or structural system, limited to:

(A)    external mechanical adjustments to facilitate correct operation of powerplant or mechanical or structural systems; and

(B)    replacement of instrument, or electrical, parts and appliances, connected by simple twist or terminal connectors — excluding instrument, or electrical parts and appliances, where maintenance involves functional tests and adjustments requiring the use of external specialised test equipment.

5.     A person who holds a Category B1 licence endorsed with a subcategory may issue a certificate of release to service for aircraft covered by a subcategory endorsed on the licence, after maintenance of the aircraft, if the maintenance was not base maintenance carried out on a large aircraft;

5A.  A person who:

             (i)   on or before 30 June 2021, satisfies the requirements of each of paragraphs 66.A.25 (i), 66.A.30 (f), and 66.A.45 (j) of this MOS; and

            (ii)   but for the repeal of regulation 31 would, thereby, have qualified for the issue of an aircraft maintenance engineer licence with the former engine category Group 1 or Group 2 rating, or the former airframe category Group 1, 2 or 19 rating; and

           (iii)   on this basis, is issued with a Category B1 licence;

        may perform maintenance certifications and issue certificates of release to service for the following maintenance:

           (iv)   all electrical maintenance on an aircraft fitted with a single generator and approved for V.F.R. operations only;

            (v)   all instrument system maintenance for aircraft general instruments (but excluding RMI, inertial navigation and multi-axis autopilots) on an aircraft approved for V.F.R. operations only;

           (vi)   periodic inspections for aircraft radio systems on an aircraft approved for V.F.R. operations only.

Note   30 June 2021 is the date by which a person must satisfy the requirements mentioned in paragraphs 66.A.25 (i), 66.A.30 (f) and 66.A.45 (j) of this MOS to qualify for a Category B1 or B2 licence (see subregulation 202.345 (1A) of CASR 1998).

6.     A person who holds a Category B2 licence may perform maintenance certification for Category B2 maintenance carried out on an aircraft if:

             (i)   the person carried out the maintenance; and

            (ii)   the maintenance was carried out:

(A)    on an aircraft system designated in Table 1 as avionic or electrical; or

(B)    on an instrument or electrical sub system of an aircraft system designated in Table 1 as structural, powerplant or mechanical; or

(C)    as a category A licence task of a kind mentioned in Appendix II of the Part 145 MOS within the limits of tasks specifically endorsed on the certification authorisation referred to in subparagraph 145.A.35 (b) 1 of the Part 145 MOS. This certification privilege is restricted to work that the licence holder has personally performed in the maintenance organisation which issued the certification authorisation and is limited to the type ratings for a large aircraft endorsed in the B2 licence; or

(D)    to replace an avionic line replaceable unit that only requires simple tests to prove its serviceability, unless the licence is specifically subject to an avionics LRU exclusion; or

(E)    as a daily, or manufacturer’s equivalent, inspection, or as an extended diversion time operation (EDTO) pre-flight inspection.

6A.  For sub-sub-subparagraph 66.A.20 (a) 6. (ii) (E), despite any exclusions annotated on a licence, a daily or manufacturers’ equivalent inspection also includes:

             (i)   check of the condition and security of attachment of wiring, plumbing, parts and appliances; and

            (ii)   maintenance of instrument, or electrical, parts and appliances forming part of the powerplant, mechanical or structural system, limited to:

(A)    external mechanical adjustments to facilitate correct operation of powerplant or mechanical or structural systems; and

(B)    replacement of instrument, or electrical, parts and appliances, connected by simple twist or terminal connectors — excluding instrument, or electrical parts and appliances, where maintenance involves functional tests and adjustments requiring the use of external specialised test equipment.

7.     A person who holds a Category B2 licence may issue a certificate of release to service for aircraft covered by the licence if the maintenance was not base maintenance carried out on a large aircraft;

8.     A person who holds a Category C licence may issue a certificate of release to service for base maintenance carried out on a large aircraft for the aircraft in its entirety, if:

             (i)   the maintenance was carried out on a large aircraft; and

            (ii)   the Category C holder’s licence is endorsed with the type rating for the large aircraft.

Table 1

Aircraft systems, designations and conditions for Category B1 and Category B2 licences

Aircraft system (and ATA chapter reference)

Designation of system

Conditions or limitations

Pressurisation, air‑conditioning and equipment cooling systems (ATA21)

Mechanical (B1)

For a Category B2 licence, pressurisation control systems.

Autopilot (ATA22)

Avionic (B2)

 

Communications (ATA23), including ELT and underwater locating beacon (ATA25-60)

Avionic (B2)

 

Generator and/or constant speed drive/IDG systems (ATA24)

Electrical (B1/B2) and  Powerplant (B1)

 

Electrical power supply systems, including a ram air turbine, if electrical (ATA24)

Electrical
(B1 and B2)

 

Equipment, furnishings and emergency equipment (ATA25)

Mechanical (B1)

Except ELT and underwater locating beacon (ATA 25-60) — see (ATA23).

Fire, smoke, overheat detecting and extinguishing systems (ATA26)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Flight control systems (ATA27)

Mechanical (B1)

For a category B1 licence — except system operation – fly-by-wire.

Flight control systems – system operation – fly‑by-wire (ATA27)

Avionic (B2)

For a Category B2 licence — limited to the avionic subsystem of the flight control system.

Fuel systems (ATA28)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Hydraulic power systems, including ram air turbine (ATA29)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Ice and rain protection systems (ATA30)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Ice and rain protection systems (ATA30-20)

Mechanical and Powerplant (B1)

Powerplant — for powerplant cowling anti‑icing.

Indicating and recording systems (ATA31)

Avionic (B2)

 

Landing gear (ATA32)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Wheels and brakes (ATA32-40)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Lighting (ATA33)

Electrical
(B1 and B2)

 

Navigation systems:

·          General

·          Radio interface

·          ACARS, SELCAL, INS/IRS

·          Compass

·          Flight manage-ment system

·          Doppler systems

(ATA34)

Avionic (B2)

For a Category B1 licence — compass swings, if endorsed on the licence.

Oxygen system
(ATA35)

Mechanical (B1)

For a Category B2 licence, if endorsed on the licence.

Pneumatic system (ATA36)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Vacuum (ATA37)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Waste water (ATA38)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Integrated modular avionics (ATA42)

Avionic (B2)

 

Cabin systems
(ATA44)

Avionic (B2)

 

Central maintenance system (ATA45)

Avionic (B2)

 

Information systems

·          ATIMS

·          Network server

(ATA46)

Avionic (B2)

 

Nitrogen generation system or inert gas system (ATA47)

Mechanical (B1)

 

APU (ATA49)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Cargo and accessory compartments (ATA50)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Structures — General (ATA51)

Structural (B1)

Structures — general, but excluding wooden structures and fabric surfaces unless:

(a)    for wooden structures — the holder has obtained the relevant optional units of competency mentioned in section 66.A.25 of this MOS; or

Note   These optional units of competency are marked W in Appendix IV.

(b)    for fabric surfaces — the holder has obtained the relevant optional units of competency mentioned in section 66.A.25 of this MOS.

Note   These optional units of competency are marked Z in Appendix IV.

Structures — general

(c)    for a category B2 licence — closing of cowlings and refitment of quick access inspection panels.

Doors (ATA52)

Structural (B1)

 

Fuselage (ATA53)

Structural (B1)

 

Nacelles and pylons (ATA54)

Structural (B1)

 

Stabilisers (ATA55)

Structural (B1)

 

Windows (ATA56)

Structural (B1)

 

Wings (ATA57)

Structural (B1)

 

Propeller — rotor (ATA60)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Propeller — propulsion (ATA61)

Powerplant (B1)

For a Category B1 licence, only if the holder has obtained the relevant optional units of competency mentioned in section 66.A.25 of this MOS.

Note   These optional units of competency are marked P in Appendix IV.

Rotor (ATA62)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Rotor drives (ATA63)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Tail rotor (ATA64)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Tail rotor drive (ATA65)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Folding blades and pylon (ATA66)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Rotor flight control (ATA67)

Mechanical (B1)

 

Powerplant (ATA71)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Engine turbine/
turbo-prop and fans (ATA72)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Engine-mounted accessories: gear boxes, gears, pumps and attached engine‑mounted and driven components
(ATA72-60)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Engine fuel and control — carbura-tion/injection system (ATA73)

Powerplant (B1)

 

FADEC (ATA73A)

Avionic (B2)

 

Ignition system (ATA74)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Air systems and control (ATA75)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Engine control system (ATA76)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Engine indicating system (ATA77)

Powerplant (B1) and Avionic (B2)

 

Exhaust — thrust reverser (ATA78)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Lubrication system (ATA79)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Starting system (ATA80)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Supercharging system (ATA81)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Power augmentation (ATA82)

Powerplant (B1)

 

Accessory drives (ATA83)

Powerplant (B1)

 

66.A.21          Transitional privileges

                 Despite Table 1 in section 66.A.20 and the exclusions annotated on a licence issued under Part 66 of CASR 1998, a person mentioned in a cell in column 1 of Table 2, who holds a Category B1 licence, may perform maintenance certifications and issue certificates of release to service for the maintenance mentioned for the person in the corresponding cell or cells in column 2, but only:

1.     for an aircraft mentioned in the corresponding cell in column 3; and

2.     subject to the limitations (if any) mentioned in the corresponding cell in column 4; and

3.     subject to the condition mentioned in column 5.

Table 2

Person

Maintenance

Aircraft

Limitations

Condition

A.

A person who held an aircraft maintenance engineer (AME) licence under regulation 31 of the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988 to which regulation 202.341, as in force immediately before 15 December 2015, applied (the old licence)

All electrical maintenance

An aircraft approved for V.F.R. operations only (approved V.F.R. aircraft), and fitted with a single generator

Not applicable (NA)

Provided that the old licence and its ratings applied to the maintenance, or would have applied to the maintenance but for Part 66 of CASR 1998 (The Proviso)

1. All instrument system maintenance for aircraft general instruments (excluding RMI, inertial navigation and multi-axis autopilots)

 

2. Periodic inspections for aircraft radio systems

Approved V.F.R. aircraft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approved V.F.R. aircraft

NA

B.

A person who, in accordance with subregulation 202.343 (2) or 202.344 (2) of CASR 1998, as in force immediately before 15 December 2015, was taken to be entitled to the issue of an AME licence by becoming qualified for, an engine category Group 1 or 2 rating, or an airframe category Group 1, 2 or 19 rating (the old licence)

All electrical maintenance

Approved V.F.R. aircraft fitted with a single generator

NA

The Proviso

1. All instrument system main-tenance for aircraft general instruments (excluding RMI, inertial navigation and multi-axis autopilots)

2. Periodic inspections for aircraft radio systems

 

 

66.A.23     Requalification requirements

        (a)     For paragraph 66.120 (2) (b) of CASR 1998, a licensed aircraft maintenance engineer is taken to comply with the requirements of that paragraph if, in the immediately preceding 2 years:

1.     he or she has had a period or periods of continuous employment amounting to at least 6 months, exercising the privileges mentioned in the Part 66 Manual of Standards for his or her licence or for a rating endorsed on the licence; or

2.     within a period or periods of time amounting to 6 months, he or she has had at least 550 hours of experience in exercising those privileges.

     (b)     For paragraph 66.120 (2) (c) of CASR 1998, the requalification requirements for an A, B1 or B2 aircraft engineer licence holder are:

1.     carrying out maintenance (as an AME) of the kind that would be covered by the privileges of any of the licences held, for no less than a total of 100 days and retaining evidence of carrying out the maintenance; or

2.     the holder obtains a report from an MTO authorised for category training or aircraft type training which states:

             (i)   that the holder has been assessed within 28 days of the date of the report; and

            (ii)   how the assessment was conducted — the assessment must include theory examination and practical assessment in a sampling of the range of maintenance activities that the holder is authorised by their licence and ratings to carry out; and

           (iii)   that the MTO has certified that the holder continues to have the knowledge and skills necessary for the holder of an aircraft engineer licence with the ratings on the licence; or

3.     the holder is assessed by an AMO, or an organisation holding a certificate of approval to carry out maintenance activities issued under regulation 30 of CAR 1988, to determine that he or she continues to have the knowledge and skills necessary for the holder of an aircraft engineer licence with the ratings on the licence, and the assessment follows a process for requalifying individuals based on Australian competency-based training (CBT) standards and outlined in:

             (i)   for the AMO — the AMO’s exposition; or

            (ii)   for the organisation holding a certificate of approval under regulation 30 of CAR 1988 — the organisation’s system of quality control.

     (c)     For paragraph 66.120 (2) (c) of CASR 1998, the requalification requirement for a Category C licence holder is that the AMO provides the holder with suitable continuing airworthiness experience to ensure that the holder has re-established their knowledge and skill.

66.A.25     Basic knowledge and competency requirements

        (a)     This section sets out the basic knowledge and competency requirements that must be met by a person who applies for:

1.     an aircraft engineer licence in a category or subcategory; or

2.     the addition of a category or subcategory to the person’s licence.

        (b)     If the application is in relation to a Category A, B1 or B2 licence, or for the addition of a subcategory to a licence, the applicant must demonstrate, by examination conducted by CASA or an MTO:

1.     knowledge of each module, applicable for the category or subcategory, in accordance with Part 2 of Appendix I; and

2.     the level of knowledge for each sub-module, applicable for the category or subcategory, in accordance with Part 3 of Appendix I.

        (c)     The level of knowledge mentioned in subparagraph (b) 2. must be demonstrated to the examination standard mentioned in Appendix II.

        (d)     Subject to paragraph (db), paragraph (da) applies if:

1.     the applicant does not hold a Category B1 or B2 licence; and

2.     the application is for a Category C licence.

      (da)     The applicant must demonstrate, by examination conducted by CASA or an MTO, the same matters mentioned in paragraph (b) and to the same examination standard mentioned in paragraph (c), as if the application is in relation to a Category B1 or B2 licence.

      (db)     Paragraph (da) does not apply if the applicant holds an academic degree mentioned in subparagraph (h) 1.

        (e)     The knowledge mentioned in paragraph (b) may be gained by:

1.     the training of the applicant by an MTO; or

2.     self-study by the applicant.

      (ea)     The applicant must have undertaken the training or self-study mentioned in paragraph (e), and passed the examinations for the modules mentioned in paragraph (b), during the 10-year period before the date of the application.

      (eb)     If the applicant was trained by an MTO, the applicant must hold each unit of competency listed and coded in Appendix IV that is marked “X”, or stated to be its alternative, for the relevant category or subcategory of aircraft engineer licence.

        (f)     In addition to the units of competency that are required under this section for a subcategory B1.1 or B1.2 licence, an applicant for the privilege that includes wooden structures or fabric surfaces or propellers, who was trained by an MTO, must hold each relevant optional unit of competency listed and coded in Appendix IV to this MOS that is marked:

1.     W — for wooden structures for the subcategory; and

2.     Z — for fabric surfaces for the subcategory; and

3.     P — for propellers for the subcategory.

        (g)     A person may be taken to hold the necessary qualifications or units of competency as set out above if an MTO has conducted a recognition of prior learning assessment in accordance with that MTO’s course plan and exposition.

        (h)     The academic qualifications required to satisfy the basic knowledge requirements for grant of a category C licence are:

1.     an academic degree (as a minimum, a 3 year bachelor of technology degree) in an aeronautical, mechanical, structural, electrical, electronic or avionics discipline obtained from a university or other higher educational institution recognised by CASA.

                  Use of CAR 31 to obtain the equivalent of an AME licence on or after 27 June 2015

         (i)     Despite anything in paragraphs (b) to (g) of this section, for subregulation 202.345 (1) of CASR 1998, a person who, if regulation 31 were still in force, would meet the requirements of regulation 31 for the issue of an AME licence in a category mentioned in paragraph (j) is taken to meet the requirements of paragraphs (b) to (g) for the issue of the Part 66 licence that is equivalent to the licence that would have been issued for the category if regulation 31 were still in force.

         (j)     The licence categories mentioned in paragraph (i) are as follows:

1.     a licence in category airframes;

2.     a licence in category engines;

3.     a licence in category radio;

4.     a licence in category electrical;

5.     a licence in category instruments.

66.A.30     Basic practical experience requirements

        (a)     An applicant for an aircraft engineer licence must have acquired the following practical experience:

1.      for a Category A, or subcategory B1.2 or B1.4, licence:

             (i)   3 years’ practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has not undertaken any relevant technical training; or

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is relevant technical training for this sub-subparagraph.

            (ii)   2 years’ practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, and completion of relevant training as a skilled worker in a technical trade; or

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is relevant training for this sub-subparagraph.

           (iii)   1 year’s practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, and completion of a category training course conducted by an MTO.

2.      for a Category B2, or subcategory B1.1 or B1.3, licence:

             (i)   5 years’ practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, if the applicant has not undertaken any relevant technical training; or

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is relevant technical training for this sub-subparagraph.

            (ii)   3 years’ practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, and completion of relevant training as a skilled worker in a technical trade; or

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is relevant training for this sub-subparagraph.

           (iii)   2 years’ practical maintenance experience on operating aircraft, and completion of a category training course conducted by an MTO.

3.     for a Category C licence:

             (i)   3 years experience exercising Category B1.1, B1.3 or B2 privileges on large aircraft; or

            (ii)   5 years experience exercising Category B1.2 or B1.4 privileges on large aircraft; or

           (iii)   for an applicant holding an academic degree mentioned in subparagraph 66.A.25 (h) 1. — 3 years’ experience working in a civil aircraft maintenance environment on a representative selection of tasks directly associated with aircraft maintenance, including at least 6 months of observation of base maintenance tasks.

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is a representative selection of tasks for this sub-subparagraph.

        (b)     Subject to paragraph (d), if a person who holds an aircraft engineer licence applies to CASA to add a category (other than Category C), or subcategory, to the licence, the person must have gained the minimum period of practical maintenance experience, for the category or subcategory, on operating aircraft in accordance with Table 3.

Table 3

Practical maintenance experience requirements for adding a category, or subcategory, to an aircraft engineer licence

To

A1

A2

A3

A4

B1.1

B1.2

B1.3

B1.4

B2

From

A1

6 months

6 months

6 months

2 years

6 months

2 years

1 year

2 years

A2

6 months

6 months

6 months

2 years

6 months

2 years

1 year

2 years

A3

6 months

6 months

6 months

2 years

1 year

2 years

6 months

2 years

A4

6 months

6 months

6 months

2 years

1 year

2 years

6 months

2 years

B1.1

None

6 months

6 months

6 months

6 months

6 months

6 months

1 year

B1.2

6 months

None

6 months

6 months

2 years

2 years

6 months

2 years

B1.3

6 months

6 months

None

6 months

6 months

6 months

6 months

1 year

B1.4

6 months

6 months

6 months

None

2 years

6 months

2 years

2 years

B2

6 months

6 months

6 months

6 months

1 year

1 year

1 year

1 year

        (c)     The experience mentioned in paragraph (b) must have been gained from a representative cross-section of maintenance tasks on operating aircraft relevant to the category or subcategory.

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is a representative cross‑section of maintenance tasks for this paragraph.

        (d)     The minimum period of experience mentioned in paragraph (b) is reduced by 50% if the applicant has completed a training course, relevant to the category or subcategory, conducted by an MTO.

        (e)     At least 1 year of the experience mentioned in paragraph (a) must be recent experience gained on aircraft relevant to the category, or subcategory, of the initial licence applied for.

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is recent experience for this paragraph.

      (ea)     Subject to paragraph (d), at least 3 months of the experience mentioned in paragraph (b) must be recent experience gained on aircraft relevant to the category, or subcategory, of licence sought to be added.

Note   See AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 for information about what is recent experience for this paragraph.

      (eb)     Aircraft maintenance experience gained outside a civil aircraft maintenance environment is taken to be practical maintenance experience for paragraph (a) if an MTO certifies, in writing, to CASA that:

1.      the experience gained is equivalent to the practical maintenance experience; and

2.      the applicant has adequate additional practical maintenance experience on civil aircraft to ensure an adequate understanding of the civil aircraft maintenance environment.

      (ec)     The experience mentioned in paragraph (a) or (b) must have been gained by the applicant during the 10-year period before the date of the application for the licence or the addition of the category, or subcategory, to the licence.

                  Use of CAR 31 to obtain the equivalent of an AME licence on or after 27 June 2015

        (f)     Despite anything in paragraphs (a) to (ec) of this section, for subregulation 202.345 (1) of CASR 1998, a person who, if regulation 31 were still in force, would meet the requirements of regulation 31 for the issue of an AME licence in a category mentioned in paragraph (g) is taken to meet the requirements of paragraphs (a) to (ec) for the issue of the Part 66 licence that is equivalent to the licence that would have been issued for the category if regulation 31 were still in force.

        (g)     The licence categories mentioned in paragraph (f) are as follows:

1.     a licence in category airframes;

2.     a licence in category engines;

3.     a licence in category radio;

4.     a licence in category electrical;

5.     a licence in category instruments.

66.A.45     Type/task training and ratings

        (a)     The holder of a Category A licence may only exercise certification privileges on a specific aircraft type following the satisfactory completion of the relevant Category A aircraft task training carried out by an appropriately approved AMO or MTO, which must include:

1.     practical hands on training and theoretical training as appropriate for each task authorised; and

2.     satisfactory completion of training demonstrated by an examination and/or by workplace assessment carried out by an AMO or MTO authorised to conduct such training.

        (b)     The holder of a subcategory B1.1, B1.2, B1.3, B1.4, or Category B2, licence may exercise his or her certification privileges on a non-rated aircraft when the licence is endorsed with the appropriate category or subcategory for the maintenance required for that non-rated aircraft.

Note   The holder of a subcategory B1.1, B1.2, B1.3, B1.4, or Category B2, licence does not require a type rating to exercise his or her certification privileges on aircraft systems other than the powerplant systems of:

       (i)    a large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine; or

      (ii)    a small aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine.

      (ba)     The holder of a subcategory B1.1, B1.2, B1.3, B1.4, or Category B2 or C, licence must only exercise his or her certification privileges on a particular type, or type and model, of a large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine when the licence is endorsed with the appropriate aircraft type rating by CASA.

Note   These are aircraft referred to in paragraph (a) of regulation 66.010 of CASR 1998 definition of aircraft type.

      (bb)     The holder of a subcategory B1.1, B1.2, B1.3 or B1.4 licence must only exercise his or her certification privileges on the powerplant systems of:

1.     a large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine; or

2.     a small aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine;

                 when the licence is endorsed with the appropriate aircraft type rating by CASA.

Note   These are aircraft referred to in paragraphs (b) and (c) of regulation 66.010 of CASR 1998 definition of aircraft type.

        (c)     A type rating may only be issued by CASA:

1.     following satisfactory completion of the relevant Category B1, B2 or C aircraft type training:

             (i)  approved by CASA; or

            (ii)  conducted by an appropriately approved MTO; or

           (iii)  conducted in accordance with paragraph (h); or

2.     if each of the following applies:

             (i)  the applicant is a category B2 licence holder (the holder) with a rating (a type rating) for a particular type, or type and model, of large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine (a large aircraft type);

            (ii)  the holder applies for a rating (the different type rating) for a large aircraft type, that is different from his or her type rating;

           (iii)  the large aircraft type to which the different type rating would apply has the same manufacturer as the large aircraft type to which the holder’s type rating applies;

           (iv)  CASA carries out an RPL assessment that compares the differences between the large aircraft type to which the type rating applies and the large aircraft type to which the different type rating would apply;

            (v)  CASA determines that the B2 systems differences between the 2 large aircraft types are not such as to require further training of the holder for the issue of the different type rating.

3.     if each of the following applies:

             (i)   the applicant is a category B1 licence holder (the holder) with a rating (a type rating) for a particular type, or type and model, of large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine (a large aircraft type);

            (ii)   the holder applies for a rating (the different type rating) for a large aircraft type, that is different from his or her type rating;

           (iii)   the large aircraft type to which the different type rating would apply has the same manufacturer as the large aircraft type to which the holder’s type rating applies;

           (iv)   CASA carries out an RPL assessment that compares the differences between the large aircraft type to which the type rating applies and the large aircraft type to which the different type rating would apply;

            (v)   CASA determines that the B1 engine (powerplant) interface differences between the 2 large aircraft types are not such as to require further training of the holder for the issue of the different type rating.

Note   In subparagraphs (c) 2 and (c) 3, a large aircraft type means, in accordance with paragraphs (a) and (b) of the definition of aircraft type in regulation 66.010 of CASR 1998:

    (a)    a particular type, or type and model, of large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine; or

    (b)    a large aircraft with a particular type of aircraft engine.

        (d)     An applicant for a Category B1 or B2 aircraft type rating must complete the applicable type training in relation to paragraph 66.A.20 (a) privileges, which consists of:

1.     theoretical training and examination; and

2.     practical training and assessment as specified in sections 66.A.50 and 66.A.55.

        (e)     Category C approved type training must comply with the requirements for such training in Appendix III to this MOS. In the case of a Category C licence holder qualified by holding an academic degree mentioned in subparagraph 66.A.25 (h) 1., the first aircraft type theoretical training must be at the Category B1 or B2 licence level. Practical training is not required.

        (f)     Completion of approved aircraft type training, as required by paragraphs (b) to (c), must be demonstrated by an examination. The examination must comply with the requirements in Appendix III to this MOS.

        (g)     The training and assessment for a restricted rating for an aircraft type may be in:

1.     a subset of the theoretical elements mentioned in Part 2 of Appendix III that are indicated for the category or subcategory by the numerical level of the type training; and

2.     the corresponding practical elements mentioned in Part 3 of Appendix III that are appropriate for the category or subcategory and the rating, only if the MTO provides in the course plan for the training a description of:

             (i)   the training and assessment in the subset of theoretical elements and its corresponding practical elements; and

            (ii)   the persons eligible to undertake the training and assessment; and

           (iii)   the restrictions for the rating to which the training and assessment relates; and

           (iv)   ensures that all documents required under this MOS in connection with the training and assessment, describe the rating as a restricted rating.

        (h)     An AMO in accordance with section 145.A.37 of the Part 145 MOS, or a COA holder in accordance with Civil Aviation Order 104.0 (Certificates of approval — application, grant and conditions) (a CAR 30 organisation), may:

1.     deliver excluded system training and assessment for the excluded systems set out in Appendix VII; or

2.     for an aircraft type mentioned in column 2 of Table 2 in Appendix IX — deliver aircraft type training for a category or subcategory of licence for the aircraft, or a system or subsystem of the aircraft type; or

3.     for an aircraft type mentioned in column 2 of Table 2 in Appendix IX — arrange for the manufacturer of the aircraft or its engine to provide training and assessment.

         (i)     A licensed aircraft maintenance engineer, seeking his or her first aircraft type rating in an alternate licence category or subcategory not currently held by that person, must have first completed category or subcategory basic knowledge and competency training as mentioned in section 66.A.25 for the issue of a licence in that category or subcategory for which he or she is seeking his or her first rating, as well as meeting the practical maintenance experience requirements specified in paragraph 66.A.30 (b).

                 Use of CAR 31 to obtain the equivalent of a Group rating on an AME licence on or after 27 June 2015

         (j)     Despite anything in paragraphs (a) to (i) of this section, for subregulation 202.345 (1) of CASR 1998, a person who, if regulation 31 were still in force,  would meet the requirements of regulation 31 for the issue of a Group rating for a category of AME licence mentioned in paragraph (k) is taken to meet the requirements of paragraphs (a) to (i) of this section for the issue of the Part 66 rating that is equivalent to the Group rating that would have been issued for the category if regulation 31 were still in force.

        (k)     The licence categories and Group ratings mentioned in paragraph (j) are as follows:

1.     a licence in category airframes, with a Group 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 10 or 19 rating, provided that, for Groups 1, 2 and 19, the airframe is not a type rated aircraft type;

2.     a licence in category engines, with a Group 1, 2, 3, 21 or 22 rating, provided that, for Group 21 and Group 22, the engine is fitted to a small aircraft;

Note   Small aircraft is defined in Part 3 of the Dictionary in CASR 1998. Part 3 contains definitions for Part 66 of CASR 1998. Under paragraph 66.5 (a) of this MOS, words and phrases generally have the same meaning as in Part 66.

3.     a licence in category radio, with a Group 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10 or 12 rating, provided that the airframe is not a type rated aircraft type;

4.     a licence in category electrical, with a Group 1 or 2 rating, provided that the airframe is not a type rated aircraft type;

5.     a licence in category instruments, with a Group 1, 3, 5, 7, 8, 9 or 10 rating, provided that the airframe is not a type rated aircraft type.

66.A.50     Aircraft type practical training

        (a)     Aircraft type practical training and assessment must include a representative cross‑section of maintenance activities relevant to the category or subcategory.

     (b)     Practical training must be of fixed content and duration and, except in the case of PCT, can be conducted by either an MTO or an appropriately approved AMO. In the case of PCT, only an MTO approved to conduct PCT may deliver and assess the training. Where practical training is conducted by an appropriately approved maintenance organisation, the practical training must be first approved by CASA. The practical training must be supported by a detailed syllabus or practical worksheets/logbook showing content and duration of training.

   (ba)     The practical element of type training may be conducted simultaneously with the conduct of the theoretical element or provided separately as a stand-alone element.

   (bb)     Options for practical training include:

1.     PCT; or

2.     practical on course (POC) training; or

3.     structured OJT performed according to a type-specific program.

        (c)     Practical training can be performed by demonstrations using equipment, components, simulators, other training devices or aircraft. This training does not need to involve actual servicing or repair of aircraft.

        (d)     Records of demonstration of practical training must be retained by the organisation conducting the practical training for at least 5 years following completion of the practical training.

        (e)     Practical training must meet the requirements of Appendix III to this MOS.

66.A.55     On the Job aircraft type Training

     (a)     In the case of a first type rating to be gained, PCT or POC alone is not acceptable for type rating endorsement. In addition to PCT or POC, an applicant must also complete on the job training (OJT).

    (aa)     In the case of a rating in another licence category or subcategory to be obtained after the type rating referred to in paragraph (a):

1.     if using POC training, POC training must be supplemented by OJT; and

2.     if using PCT training, no supplementation by OJT is required.

     (b)     OJT, other than that normally required as part of a PCT course, is not required in the case of a second or subsequent type rating if the practical training for the second or subsequent type rating (in the same or any other category or subcategory) is delivered using PCT.

        (c)     OJT:

1.     may only be conducted and managed by a maintenance organisation, or a maintenance training organisation, approved by CASA to undertake such training activities; and

2.     must be supported by a detailed syllabus of OJT content which includes provision for completion of the OJT to be recorded in detailed worksheets or logbooks; and

3.     must be assessed and approved by CASA.

Note   CASA’s assessment and approval are guided by Appendix II of AMC/GM for CASR Part 66 and the CASA publication titled Advisory Circular AC 66-07 – Practical training options for aircraft type training and recording of recent work experience, as existing from time to time.

    (ca)     For paragraph (c), the maintenance organisation approved by CASA must be:

1.     an approved maintenance organisation (AMO) issued with an approval under regulation 145.030 of CASR 1998 to carry out maintenance activities; or

2.     an organisation holding a certificate of approval to carry out maintenance activities issued under regulation 30 of the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988.

        (d)     OJT must be supervised and assessed by approved assessors.

        (e)     OJT must comply with the requirements of Appendix III to this MOS.

66.A.56     Use of CAR 31 for removal of exclusion from a Part 66 licence on or after 27 June 2015

        (a)     This section applies to a person (the Part 66 licence holder) who holds a Part 66 licence that is subject to the exclusion of a particular aircraft system or a subset of an aircraft system (a particular exclusion).

Note   Part 66 licence holder includes a person who holds a Part 66 licence subject to a particular exclusion, as a result of the operation of paragraphs 66.A.25 (i) and 66.A.30 (f) of this MOS.

        (b)     If the Part 66 licence holder would meet the requirements of regulation 31 for the issue of a category of AME licence mentioned in paragraph 66.A.25 (i) or 66.A.30 (f) without a particular exclusion, were regulation 31 still in force, then the holder is taken to meet the requirements of sections 66.A.25 and 66.A.30 of this MOS for the issue of the Part 66 licence without the particular exclusion.

66.A.57     Use of CAR 31 for removal of exclusion from a Part 66 rating on or after 27 June 2015

        (a)     This section applies to a person (the Part 66 rating holder) who holds a Part 66 rating that is subject to the exclusion of a particular aircraft system or a subset of an aircraft system (a particular exclusion).

Note   Part 66 rating holder includes a person who holds a Part 66 rating subject to a particular exclusion, as a result of the operation of paragraph 66.A.45 (j) of this MOS.

        (b)     If the Part 66 rating holder would meet the requirements of regulation 31 for the issue of a Group rating on a category of AME licence without the particular exclusion, were regulation 31 still in force, then the holder is taken to meet the requirements of section 66.A.45 of this MOS for the issue of the Part 66 rating without the particular exclusion.

66.A.58     Exemptions to facilitate the operation of certain provisions

        (a)     A person to whom paragraph 66.A.25 (i), paragraph 66.A.30 (f) or section 66.A.56 of this MOS applies is exempt from subregulation 66.072 (3) of CASR 1998.

        (b)     A person to whom paragraph 66.A.45 (j) or section 66.A.57 of this MOS applies is exempt from each of the following provisions of CASR 1998:

1.     paragraph 66.080 (1) (b);

2.     subregulations 66.080 (2) and (3);

3.     paragraphs 66.095 (1) (c) and (2) (d);

4.     regulation 66.100; and

5.     paragraph 66.110 (2) (a).

        (c)     Each exemption mentioned in paragraphs (a) and (b) expires at the end of 30 June 2021.

66.A.60     Recognised States

                 For the purposes of regulation 66.030 of CASR 1998, recognised States are set out in Appendix V.

66.A.65     Excluded States

                 For the purposes of regulation 66.060 of CASR 1998, excluded States are set out in Appendix VI.

66.A.70     Limitations

     (a)     Limitations introduced on an aircraft maintenance licence are exclusions from the certification privileges and apply to the aircraft in its entirety.

     (b)     Exclusions annotated on a category can be removed by gaining the section 66.A.25 basic knowledge and competency requirements relevant to the exclusion removal.

     (c)     Exclusions annotated on a rating can be removed by CASA after satisfactorily completing, as required:

1.     paragraph 66.A.45 (d) training and examination; with

2.     section 66.A.50 practical training and assessment; or

3.     section 66.A.55 on the job training and assessment.

                 The training, assessment and examination may be provided by an MTO or, if described in its Part 145 AMO exposition, by an AMO if the exclusion removal has been permitted under subparagraph 66.100 (a) (ii) of CASR 1998, using a training and assessment regime provided in accordance with paragraph 145.025 (3) (c) of CASR 1998.

     (d)     For the purposes of subregulation 66.095 (2), and Subpart 202.GG, of CASR 1998, exclusions on type ratings, that an AMO may be authorised to provide training, assessment and authorisations for, are set out in Appendix VII.

     (e)     Units of competency are required as mentioned in Appendix VIII before the removal of an exclusion from a category or subcategory of licence in accordance with paragraph (b).

Part 3      Transitional provisions

66.A.100  Transitional provision for Part 66 Manual of Standards Amendment Instrument 2018 (No. 1)

   (1)     If:

(a)   immediately before the commencement day, a person held a unit of competency (the previous unit) mentioned in the table in Appendix IV of this MOS; and

(b)   the relevant instrument replaces the previous unit with a new version of the unit of competency (the new unit);

the person is taken to hold the new unit.

   (2)     In this section:

commencement day means the day on which the relevant instrument commences.

relevant instrument means the Part 66 Manual of Standards Amendment Instrument 2018 (No. 1).

Appendix I

Basic knowledge requirements

Part 1 — Levels of knowledge for Category A, B1, B2 or C licence

              The basic knowledge requirements for a Category A, B1 or B2 licence, or subcategory to an aircraft engineer licence, are indicated by the level of knowledge (1, 2 or 3), for each applicable sub-module, under Part 3 of this appendix. The basic knowledge requirements for a Category C licence are the same as that for a Category B1 or B2 licence. The levels of knowledge are defined as follows:

            Level 1

              A familiarisation with the principal elements of the subject such that the following objectives are met.

            Objectives:

            1     The applicant must be familiar with the basic elements of the subject.

            2     The applicant must be able to give a simple description of the whole subject, using common words and examples.

            3     The applicant must be able to use typical terms.

            Level 2

              A general knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject and an ability to apply that knowledge, such that the following objectives are met.

             Objectives:

            1     The applicant must be able to understand the theoretical fundamentals of the subject.

            2     The applicant must be able to give a general description of the subject using, as appropriate, typical examples.

            3     The applicant must be able to use mathematical formulae in conjunction with physical laws describing the subject.

            4     The applicant must be able to read and understand sketches, drawings and schematics describing the subject.

            5     The applicant must be able to apply his or her knowledge in a practical manner using detailed procedures.

            Level 3

              A detailed knowledge of the theoretical and practical aspects of the subject, and a capacity to combine and apply the separate elements of knowledge in a logical and comprehensive manner, such that the following objectives are met.

             Objectives:

            1     The applicant must know the theory of the subject and interrelationships with other subjects.

            2     The applicant must be able to give a detailed description of the subject using theoretical fundamentals and specific examples.

            3     The applicant must understand and be able to use mathematical formulae related to the subject.

            4     The applicant must be able to read, understand and prepare sketches, simple drawings and schematics describing the subject.

            5     The applicant must be able to apply his or her knowledge in a practical manner using manufacturer’s instructions.

            6     The applicant must be able to interpret results from various sources and measurements and apply corrective action where appropriate.

Part 2 — Knowledge module requirements

               Qualification on basic subjects for each category or subcategory of licence must be in accordance with the following table. Applicable subjects are indicated by an X.

Subject modules

A or B1 aeroplane with:

A or B1 helicopter with:

B2

 

Turbine engine(s)

Piston engine(s)

Turbine engine(s)

Piston engine(s)

Avionics

1     Mathematics

X

X

X

X

X

2     Physics

X

X

X

X

X

3     Electrical fundamentals

X

X

X

X

X

4     Electronic fundamentals

X

X

X

X

X

5     Digital techniques electronic instrument systems

X

X

X

X

X

6     Materials and hardware

X

X

X

X

X

7     Maintenance practices

X

X

X

X

X

8     Basic aerodynamics

X

X

X

X

X

9     Human factors

X

X

X

X

X

10   Aviation legislation

X

X

X

X

X

11A  Turbine aeroplane aerodynamics, structures and systems

X

 

 

 

 

11B   Piston aeroplane aerodynamics, structures and systems

 

X

 

 

 

12   Helicopter aerodynamics, structures and systems

 

 

X

X

 

13   Aircraft aerodynamics, structures and systems

 

 

 

 

X

14   Propulsion

 

 

 

 

X

15   Gas turbine engine

X

 

X

 

 

16   Piston engine

 

X

 

X

 

17   Propeller

X

X

 

 

 

Part 3 — Details of modules and levels of knowledge

Module 1       Mathematics

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

A

B1

B2

1.1   Arithmetic

1

2

2

Arithmetical terms and signs, methods of multiplication and division, fractions and decimals, factors and multiples, weights, measures and conversion factors, ratio and proportion, averages and percentages, areas and volumes, squares, cubes, square and cube roots.

 

 

 

1.2   Algebra

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

2

       Evaluating simple algebraic expressions, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division, use of brackets, simple algebraic fractions;

 

 

 

(b)

1

1

       Linear equations and their solutions;

       Indices and powers, negative and fractional indices;

       Binary and other applicable numbering systems;

       Simultaneous equations and second degree equations with one unknown;

       Logarithms.

 

 

 

1.3   Geometry

 

 

 

(a)

1

1

       Simple geometrical constructions;

 

 

 

(b)

2

2

2

       Graphical representation, nature and uses of graphs, graphs of equations and functions;

 

 

 

(c)

2

2

       Simple trigonometry, trigonometrical relationships, use of tables and rectangular and polar coordinates.

 

 

 

Module 2       Physics

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

2.1   Matter

1

1

1

Nature of matter: the chemical elements, structure of atoms, molecules;

Chemical compounds;

States: solid, liquid and gaseous;

Changes between states.

 

 

 

2.2   Mechanics

 

 

 

2.2.1   Statics

1

2

1

Forces, moments and couples, representation as vectors;

Centre of gravity;

Elements of theory of stress, strain and elasticity: tension, compression, shear and torsion;

Nature and properties of solid, fluid and gas;

Pressure and buoyancy in liquids (barometers).

 

 

 

2.2.2   Kinetics

1

2

1

Linear movement: uniform motion in a straight line, motion under constant acceleration (motion under gravity);

Rotational movement: uniform circular motion (centrifugal and centripetal forces);

Periodic motion: pendular movement;

Simple theory of vibration, harmonics and resonance;

Velocity ratio, mechanical advantage and efficiency.

 

 

 

2.2.3   Dynamics

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

1

         Mass;

       Force, inertia, work, power, energy (potential, kinetic and total energy), heat, efficiency;

 

 

 

(b)

1

2

2

       Momentum, conservation of momentum;

       Impulse;

       Gyroscopic principles;

       Friction: nature and effects, coefficient of friction (rolling resistance).

 

 

 

2.2.4   Fluid dynamics

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

2

       Specific gravity and density;

 

 

 

(b)

1

2

1

       Viscosity, fluid resistance, effects of streamlining;

       Effects of compressibility on fluids;

       Static, dynamic and total pressure: Bernoulli’s Theorem, venturi.

 

 

 

2.3   Thermodynamics

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

2

       Temperature: thermometers and temperature scales: Celsius, Fahrenheit and Kelvin, heat definition;

 

 

 

(b)

2

2

       Heat capacity, specific heat;

       Heat transfer: convection, radiation and conduction;

       Volumetric expansion;

       First and second law of thermodynamics;

       Gases: ideal gases laws, specific heat at constant volume and constant pressure, work done by expanding gas;

       Isothermal, adiabatic expansion and compression, engine cycles, constant volume and constant pressure, refrigerators and heat pumps;

       Latent heats of fusion and evaporation, thermal energy, heat of combustion.

 

 

 

2.4   Optics (light)

2

2

Nature of light, speed of light;

Laws of reflection and refraction: reflection at plane surfaces, reflection by spherical mirrors, refraction, lenses;

Fiberoptics.

 

 

 

2.5   Wave motion and sound

2

2

Wave motion: mechanical waves, sinusoidal wave motion, interference phenomena, standing waves;

Sound: speed of sound, production of sound, intensity, pitch and quality, Doppler effect.

 

 

 

Module 3       Electrical fundamentals

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

3.1   Electron theory

1

1

1

Structure and distribution of electrical charges within atoms, molecules, ions, compounds;

Molecular structure of conductors, semiconductors and insulators.

 

 

 

3.2   Static electricity and conduction

1

2

2

Static electricity and distribution of electrostatic charges;

Electrostatic laws of attraction and repulsion;

Units of charge, Coulomb’s Law;

Conduction of electricity in solids, liquids, gases and vacuum.

 

 

 

3.3   Electrical terminology

1

2

2

The following terms, their units and factors affecting them: potential difference, electromotive force, voltage, current, resistance, conductance, charge, conventional current flow, electron flow.

 

 

 

3.4   Generation of electricity

1

1

1

Production of electricity by the following methods: light, heat, friction, pressure, chemical action, magnetism and motion.

 

 

 

3.5   DC sources of electricity

1

2

2

Construction and basic chemical action of: primary cells, secondary cells, lead acid cells, nickel cadmium cells, other Alkaline cells;

Cells connected in series and parallel;

Internal resistance and its effect on a battery;

Construction, materials and operation of thermocouples;

Operation of photo-cells.

 

 

 

3.6   DC circuits

2

2

Ohms Law, Kirchoff’s Voltage and Current Laws;

Calculations using the above laws to find resistance, voltage and current;

Significance of the internal resistance of a supply.

 

 

 

3.7   Resistance and resistor

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Resistance and affecting factors;

       Specific resistance;

       Resistor colour code, values and tolerances, preferred values, wattage ratings;

       Resistors in series and parallel;

       Calculation of total resistance using series parallel and series parallel combinations;

       Operation and use of potentiometers and rheostats;

       Operation of Wheatstone Bridge;

 

 

 


(b)

1

1

       Positive and negative temperature coefficient conductance;

       Fixed resistors, stability, tolerance and limitations, methods of construction;

       Variable resistors, thermistors, voltage dependent resistors;

       Construction of potentiometers and rheostats;

       Construction of Wheatstone Bridge.

 

 

 

3.8   Power

2

2

Power, work and energy (kinetic and potential);

Dissipation of power by a resistor;

Power formula;

Calculations involving power, work and energy.

 

 

 

3.9   Capacitance and capacitor

2

2

Operation and function of a capacitor;

Factors affecting capacitance area of plates, distance between plates, number of plates, dielectric and dielectric constant, working voltage, voltage rating;

Capacitor types, construction and function;

Capacitor colour coding;

Calculations of capacitance and voltage in series and parallel circuits;

Exponential charge and discharge of a capacitor, time constants;

Testing of capacitors.

 

 

 

3.10   Magnetism

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Theory of magnetism;

       Properties of a magnet;

       Action of a magnet suspended in the Earth’s magnetic field;

       Magnetisation and demagnetisation;

       Magnetic shielding;

       Various types of magnetic material;

       Electromagnets construction and principles of operation;

       Hand clasp rules to determine: magnetic field around current carrying conductor.

 

 

 

(b)

2

2

       Magneto-motive force, field strength, magnetic flux density, permeability, hysteresis loop, retentivity, coercive force reluctance, saturation point, eddy currents;

       Precautions for care and storage of magnets.

 

 

 

3.11   Inductance and inductor

2

2

Faraday’s Law;

Action of inducing a voltage in a conductor moving in a magnetic field;

Induction principles;

Effects of the following on the magnitude of an induced voltage: magnetic field strength, rate of change of flux, number of conductor turns;

Mutual induction;

The effect the rate of change of primary current and mutual inductance has on induced voltage;

Factors affecting mutual inductance: number of turns in coil, physical size of coil, permeability of coil, position of coils with respect to each other;

Lenz’s Law and polarity determining rules;

Back emf, self-induction;

Saturation point;

Principal uses of inductors.

 

 

 

3.12   DC motor and generator theory

2

2

Basic motor and generator theory;

Construction and purpose of components in DC generator;

Operation of, and factors affecting output and direction of, current flow in DC generators;

Operation of, and factors affecting output power, torque, speed and direction of rotation of DC motors;

Series wound, shunt wound and compound motors;

Starter generator construction.

 

 

 

3.13   AC theory

1

2

2

Sinusoidal waveform: phase, period, frequency, cycle;

Instantaneous, average, root mean square, peak, peak to peak current values and calculations of these values, in relation to voltage, current and power;

Triangular and square waves;

Single and 3 phase principles.

 

 

 

3.14   Resistive (R), Capacitive (C) and Inductive (L) Circuits

2

2

Phase relationship of voltage and current in L, C and R circuits, parallel, series and series parallel;

Power dissipation in L, C and R circuits;

Impedance, phase angle, power factor and current calculations;

True power, apparent power and reactive power calculations.

 

 

 

3.15   Transformers

2

2

Transformer construction principles and operation;

Transformer losses and methods for overcoming them;

Transformer action under load and no-load conditions;

Power transfer, efficiency, polarity markings;

Calculation of line and phase voltages and currents;

Calculation of power in a 3 phase system;

Primary and secondary current, voltage, turns ratio, power, efficiency;

Autotransformers.

 

 

 

3.16   Filters

1

1

Operation, application and uses of the following filters: low pass, high pass, band pass, band stop.

 

 

 

3.17   AC generators

2

2

Rotation of loop in a magnetic field and waveform produced;

Operation and construction of revolving armature and revolving field type AC generators;

Single phase, 2 phase and 3 phase alternators;

Three phase star and delta connections advantages and uses;

Permanent magnet generators.

 

 

 

3.18   AC motors

2

2

Construction, principles of operation and characteristics of:

AC synchronous and induction motors both single and polyphase;

Methods of speed control and direction of rotation;

Methods of producing a rotating field: capacitor, inductor, shaded or split pole.

 

 

 

Module 4       Electronic fundamentals

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

A

B1

B2

4.1   Semiconductors

 

 

 

4.1.1   Diodes

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Diode symbols;

       Diode characteristics and properties;

       Diodes in series and parallel;

       Main characteristics and use of silicon controlled rectifiers (thyristors), light emitting diode, photo conductive diode, varistor, rectifier diodes;

       Functional testing of diodes;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Materials, electron configuration, electrical properties;

       P and N type materials: effects of impurities on conduction, majority and minority characters;

       PN junction in a semiconductor, development of a potential across a PN junction in unbiased, forward biased and reverse biased conditions;

       Diode parameters: peak inverse voltage, maximum forward current, temperature, frequency, leakage current, power dissipation;

       Operation and function of diodes in the following circuits: clippers, clampers, full and half wave rectifiers, bridge rectifiers, voltage doublers and triplers;

       Detailed operation and characteristics of the following devices: silicon controlled rectifier (thyristor), light emitting diode, Shottky diode, photoconductive diode, varactor diode, varistor, rectifier diodes, Zener diode.

 

 

 

4.1.2   Transistors

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

       Transistor symbols;

       Component description and orientation;

       Transistor characteristics and properties;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Construction and operation of PNP and NPN transistors;

       Base, collector and emitter configurations;

       Testing of transistors;

       Basic appreciation of other transistor types and their uses;

       Application of transistors: classes of amplifier (A, B, C);

       Simple circuits including: bias, decoupling, feedback and stabilisation;

       Multistage circuit principles: cascades, push-pull, oscillators, multivibrators, flip-flop circuits.

 

 

 

4.1.3   Integrated circuits

 

 

 

(a)

1

       Description and operation of logic circuits and linear circuits and operational amplifiers;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Description and operation of logic circuits and linear circuits;

       Introduction to operation and function of an operational amplifier used as: integrator, differentiator, voltage follower, comparator;

       Operation and amplifier stages connecting methods: resistive capacitive, inductive (transformer), inductive resistive (IR), direct;

       Advantages and disadvantages of positive and negative feedback.

 

 

 

4.2   Printed circuit boards

1

2

Description and use of printed circuit boards.

 

 

 

4.3   Servomechanisms

 

 

 

(a)

1

       Understanding of the following terms: open and closed loop systems, feedback, follow up, analogue transducers;

       Principles of operation and use of the following synchro system components and features: resolvers, differential, control and torque, transformers, inductance and capacitance transmitters;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Understanding of the following terms: open and closed loop, follow up, servomechanism, analogue, transducer,         null, damping, feedback, dead band;

       Construction operation and use of the following synchro system components: resolvers, differential, control and torque, E and I transformers, inductance transmitters, capacitance transmitters, synchronous transmitters;

       Servo mechanism defects, reversal of synchro leads, hunting.

 

 

 

Module 5       Digital techniques/electronic instrument systems

 

Level of
knowledge
for the
category

 

A

B1.1
B1.3

B1.2
B1.4

B2

5.1   Electronic instrument systems

1

2

2

3

Typical systems arrangements and cockpit layout of electronic instrument systems.

 

 

 

 

5.2   Numbering systems

1

2

Numbering systems: binary, octal and hexadecimal;

Demonstration of conversions between the decimal and binary, octal and hexadecimal systems, and vice versa.

 

 

 

 

5.3   Data conversion

1

2

Analogue data, digital data;

Operation and application of analogue to digital, and digital to analogue converters, inputs and outputs, limitations of various types.

 

 

 

 

5.4   Data buses

2

2

Operation of data buses in aircraft systems, including knowledge of ARINC and other specifications;

Aircraft network/ethernet.

 

 

 

 

5.5   Logic circuits

 

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Identification of common logic gate symbols, tables and equivalent circuits;

       Applications used for aircraft systems, schematic diagrams;

 

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Interpretation of logic diagrams.

 

 

 

 

5.6   Basic computer structure

 

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

       Computer terminology (including bit, byte, software, hardware, CPU, IC, and various memory devices, such as RAM, ROM, PROM);

       Computer technology (as applied in aircraft systems);

 

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Computer-related terminology;

       Operation, layout and interface of the major components in a microcomputer, including their associated bus systems;

       Information contained in single and multi-address instruction words;

       Memory-associated terms;

       Operation of typical memory devices;

       Operation, advantages and disadvantages of the various data storage systems.

 

 

 

 

5.7   Microprocessors

2

Functions performed and overall operation of a microprocessor;

Basic operation of each of the following microprocessor elements: control and processing unit, clock, register, arithmetic logic unit.

 

 

 

 

5.8   Integrated circuits

2

Operation and use of encoders and decoders;

Function of encoder types;

Uses of medium, large and very large-scale integration.

 

 

 

 

5.9   Multiplexing

2

Operation, application and identification in logic diagrams of multiplexers and demultiplexers.

 

 

 

 

5.10   Fibre optics

1

1

2

Advantages and disadvantages of fibre-optic data transmission over electrical wire propagation;

Fibre-optic data bus;

Fibre-optic related terms;

Terminations;

Couplers, control terminals, remote terminals;

Application of fibre optics in aircraft systems.

 

 

 

 

5.11   Electronic displays

2

1

2

Principles of operation of common types of displays used in modern aircraft, including cathode ray tubes, light emitting diodes and liquid crystal display.

 

 

 

 

5.12   Electrostatic sensitive devices

1

2

2

2

Special handling of components sensitive to electrostatic discharges;

Awareness of risks and possible damage, component and personnel anti-static protection devices.

 

 

 

 

5.13   Software management control

2

1

2

Awareness of restrictions, airworthiness requirements and possible catastrophic effects of unapproved changes to software programs.

 

 

 

 

5.14   Electromagnetic environment

2

2

2

Influence of the following phenomena on maintenance practices for electronic system:

·         EMC – electromagnetic compatibility

·         EMI – electromagnetic interference

·         HIRF – high-intensity radiated field

·         Lightning and lightning protection.

 

 

 

 

5.15   Typical electronic/digital aircraft systems

2

2

2

General arrangement of typical electronic/digital aircraft systems and associated built-in test equipment (BITE), such as the following:

·         ACARS – ARINC communication and addressing and reporting system

·         ECAM – electronic centralised aircraft monitoring

·         EFIS – electronic flight instrument system

·         EICAS – engine indication and crew alerting system

·         FBW – fly-by-wire

·         FMS – flight management system

·         GPS – global positioning system

·         IRS – inertial reference system

·         TCAS – traffic alert collision avoidance system.

 

 

 

 

Module 6       Materials and hardware

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

6.1   Aircraft materials ferrous

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

1

       Characteristics, properties and identification of common alloy steels used in aircraft;

       Heat treatment and application of alloy steels;

 

 

 

(b)

1

1

       Testing of ferrous materials for hardness, tensile strength, fatigue strength and impact resistance.

 

 

 

6.2   Aircraft materials — non-ferrous

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

1

       Characteristics, properties and identification of common non-ferrous materials used in aircraft;

       Heat treatment and application of non-ferrous materials;

 

 

 

(b)

1

1

       Testing of non-ferrous material for hardness, tensile strength, fatigue strength and impact resistance.

 

 

 

6.3   Aircraft materials — composite and non-metallic

 

 

 

6.3.1   Composite and non-metallic other than wood and fabric

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

2

       Characteristics, properties and identification of common composite and non-metallic materials, other than wood, used in aircraft;

       Sealant and bonding agents;

 

 

 

(b)

1

2

       The detection of defects and deterioration in composite and non‑metallic material;

       Repair of composite and non-metallic material.

 

 

 

6.3.2   Wooden structures

1

2

Construction methods of wooden airframe structures;

Characteristics, properties and types of wood and glue used in aeroplanes;

Preservation and maintenance of wooden structure;

Types of defects in wood material and wooden structures;

The detection of defects in wooden structure;

Repair of wooden structure.

 

 

 

6.3.3   Fabric covering

1

2

Characteristics, properties and types of fabrics used in aeroplanes;

Inspections methods for fabric;

Types of defects in fabric;

Repair of fabric covering.

 

 

 

6.4   Corrosion

 

 

 

(a)

1

1

1

       Chemical fundamentals;

       Formation by galvanic action process, microbiological, stress;

 

 

 

(b)

2

3

2

       Types of corrosion and their identification;

       Causes of corrosion;

       Material types, susceptibility to corrosion.

 

 

 

6.5   Fasteners

 

 

 

6.5.1   Screw threads

2

2

2

Screw nomenclature;

Thread forms, dimensions and tolerances for standard threads used in aircraft;

Measuring screw threads;

 

 

 

6.5.2   Bolts, studs and screws

2

2

2

Bolt types: specification, identification and marking of aircraft bolts, international standards;

Nuts: self-locking, anchor, standard types;

Machine screws: aircraft specifications;

Studs: types and uses, insertion and removal;

Self tapping screws, dowels.

 

 

 

6.5.3   Locking devices

2

2

2

Tab and spring washers, locking plates, split pins, pal-nuts, wire locking, quick release fasteners, keys, circlips, cotter pins.

 

 

 

6.5.4   Aircraft rivets

1

2

1

Types of solid and blind rivets: specifications and identification, heat treatment.

 

 

 

6.6   Pipes and unions

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

2

       Identification of, and types of, rigid and flexible pipes and their connectors used in aircraft;

 

 

 

(b)

2

2

1

       Standard unions for aircraft hydraulic, fuel, oil, pneumatic and air system pipes.

 

 

 

6.7   Springs

2

1

Types of springs, materials, characteristics and applications.

 

 

 

6.8   Bearings

1

2

2

Purpose of bearings, loads, material, construction;

Types of bearings and their application.

 

 

 

6.9   Transmissions

1

2

2

Gear types and their application;

Gear ratios, reduction and multiplication gear systems, driven and driving gears, idler gears, mesh patterns;

Belts and pulleys, chains and sprockets.

 

 

 

6.10   Control cables

1

2

1

Types of cables;

End fittings, turn buckles and compensation devices;

Pulleys and cable system components;

Bowden cables;

Aircraft flexible control systems.

 

 

 

6.11   Electrical cables and connectors

1

2

2

Cable types, construction and characteristics;

High tension and co-axial cables;

Crimping;

Connector types, pins, plugs, sockets, insulators, current and voltage rating, coupling, identification codes.

 

 

 

Module 7       Maintenance practices

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

7.1   Safety precautions — aircraft and workshop

3

3

3

Aspects of safe working practices including precautions to take when working with electricity, gases especially oxygen, oils and chemicals;

Instruction in the remedial action to be taken in the event of a fire or another accident with one or more of these hazards including knowledge on extinguishing agents.

 

 

 

7.2   Workshop practices

3

3

3

Care of tools, control of tools, use of workshop materials;

Dimensions, allowances and tolerances, standards of workmanship;

Calibration of tools and equipment, calibration standards.

 

 

 

7.3   Tools

3

3

3

Common hand tool types;

Common power tool types;

Operation and use of precision measuring tools;

Lubrication equipment and methods;

Operation, function and use of electrical general test equipment.

 

 

 

7.4   Avionic general test equipment

2

3

Operation, function and use of avionic general test equipment.

 

 

 

7.5   Engineering drawings, diagrams and standards

1

2

2

Drawing types and diagrams, their symbols, dimensions, tolerances and projections;

Identifying title block information;

Microfilm, microfiche and computerised presentations;

Specification 100 of the ATA;

Aeronautical and other applicable standards including ISO, AN, MS, NAS and MIL;

Wiring diagrams and schematic diagrams.

 

 

 

7.6   Fits and clearances

1

2

1

Drill sizes for bolt holes, classes of fits;

Common system of fits and clearances;

Schedule of fits and clearances for aircraft and engines;

Limits for bow, twist and wear;

Standard methods for checking shafts, bearings and other parts.

 

 

 

7.7   Electrical wiring interconnection system (EWIS)

1

3

3

Continuity, insulation and bonding techniques and testing;

Use of crimp tools: hand and hydraulic operated;

Testing of crimp joints;

Connector pin removal and insertion;

Co-axial cables: testing and installation precautions;

Identification of wire types, their inspection criteria and damage tolerance;

Wiring-protection techniques: cable looming and loom support, cable clamps, protective sleeving techniques, including heat shrink wrapping, shielding;

EWIS installations, inspection, repair, maintenance and cleanliness standards.

 

 

 

7.8   Riveting

1

2

Riveted joints, rivet spacing and pitch;

Tools used for riveting and dimpling;

Inspection of riveted joints.

 

 

 

7.9   Pipes and hoses

1

2

Bending and belling and flaring aircraft pipes;

Inspection and testing of aircraft pipes and hoses;

Installation and clamping of pipes.

 

 

 

7.10   Springs

1

2

Inspection and testing of springs.

 

 

 

7.11   Bearings

1

2

Testing, cleaning and inspection of bearings;

Lubrication requirements of bearings;

Defects in bearings and their causes.

 

 

 

7.12   Transmissions

1

2

Inspection of gears, backlash;

Inspection of belts and pulleys, chains and sprockets;

Inspection of screw jacks, lever devices, push-pull rod systems.

 

 

 

7.13   Control cables

1

2

Swaging of end fittings;

Inspection and testing of control cables;

Bowden cables;

Aircraft flexible control systems.

 

 

 

7.14   Material handling

 

 

 

7.14.1   Sheet Metal

2

Marking out, and calculation of, bend allowance;

Sheet metal working including bending and forming;

Inspection of sheet metal work.

 

 

 

7.14.2   Composite and non-metallic

2

Bonding practices;

Environmental conditions;

Inspection methods.

 

 

 

7.15   Welding, brazing, soldering and bonding

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Soldering methods, inspection of soldered joints;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Welding and brazing methods;

       Inspection of welded and brazed joints;

       Bonding methods and inspection of bonded joints.

 

 

 

7.16   Aircraft weight and balance

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Centre of gravity and balance limits calculation: use of relevant documents;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       Preparation of aircraft for weighing;

       Aircraft weighing.

 

 

 

7.17   Aircraft handling and storage

2

2

2

Aircraft taxiing and towing and associated safety precautions;

Aircraft jacking, chocking, securing and associated safety precautions;

Aircraft storage methods;

Refuelling and defuelling procedures;

De-icing and anti-icing procedures;

Electrical, hydraulic and pneumatic ground supplies;

Effects of environmental conditions on aircraft handling and operation.

 

 

 

7.18   Disassembly, inspection, repair and assembly techniques

 

 

 

(a)

2

3

2

       Types of defects and visual inspection techniques;

       Corrosion removal, assessment and reprotection;

 

 

 

(b)

2

       General repair methods, Structural Repair Manual;

       Ageing, fatigue and corrosion control programs;

 

 

 

(c)

2

1

       Non-destructive inspection techniques including: penetrant, radiographic, eddy current, ultrasonic and borescope methods;

 

 

 

(d)

2

2

2

       Disassembly and re-assembly techniques;

 

 

 

(e)

2

2

       Trouble shooting techniques.

 

 

 

7.19   Abnormal events

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

2

       Inspections following lightning strikes and HIRF penetration.

 

 

 

(b)

2

2

       Inspections following abnormal events such as heavy landings and flight through turbulence.

 

 

 

7.20   Maintenance procedures

1

2

2

Maintenance planning;

Modification procedures;

Stores procedures;

Certification and release procedures;

Interface with aircraft operation;

Maintenance inspection, quality control and quality assurance;

Additional maintenance procedures;

Control of life limited components.

 

 

 

Module 8       Basic aerodynamics

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

8.1   Physics of the atmosphere

1

2

2

International Standard Atmosphere (ISA), application aerodynamics.

 

 

 

8.2   Aerodynamics

1

2

2

Air flow around a body;

Boundary layer, laminar and turbulent flow, free stream flow, relative airflow, up wash and downwash, vortices, stagnation;

The terms: camber, chord, mean aerodynamic chord, profile (parasite) drag, induced drag, centre of pressure, angle of attack, wash in and washout, fineness ratio, wing shape and aspect ratio;

Thrust, weight, aerodynamic resultant;

Generation of lift and drag: angle of attack, lift coefficient, drag coefficient, polar curve, stall;

Aerofoil contamination including ice, snow, frost.

 

 

 

8.3   Theory of flight

1

2

2

Relationship between lift, weight, thrust and drag;

Glide ratio;

Steady state flights, performance;

Theory of the turn;

Influence of load factor: stall, flight envelope and structural limitations;

Lift augmentation.

 

 

 

8.4   Flight stability and dynamics

1

2

2

Longitudinal, lateral and directional stability (active and passive).

 

 

 

Module 9       Human factors

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

9.1   General

1

2

2

The need to take human factors into account;

Incidents attributable to human factors and human error;

“Murphy’s” law.

 

 

 

9.2   Human performance and limitations

1

2

2

Vision;

Hearing;

Information processing;

Attention and perception;

Memory;

Claustrophobia and physical access.

 

 

 

9.3   Social psychology

1

1

1

Responsibility: individual and group;

Motivation and de-motivation;

Peer pressure;

Culture issues;

Team working;

Management, supervision and leadership.

 

 

 

9.4   Factors affecting performance

2

2

2

Fitness and health;

Stress: domestic and work related;

Time pressure and deadlines;

Workload: overload and underload;

Sleep and fatigue, shiftwork;

Alcohol, medication, drug abuse.

 

 

 

9.5   Physical environment

1

1

1

Noise and fumes;

Illumination;

Climate and temperature;

Motion and vibration;

Working environment.

 

 

 

9.6   Tasks

1

1

1

Physical work;

Repetitive tasks;

Visual inspection;

Complex systems.

 

 

 

9.7   Communication

2

2

2

Within and between teams;

Work logging and recording;

Keeping up-to-date, currency;

Dissemination of information.

 

 

 

9.8   Human error

1

2

2

Error models and theories;

Types of error in maintenance tasks;

Implications of errors (i.e. accidents);

Avoiding and managing errors.

 

 

 

9.9   Hazards in the workplace

1

2

2

Recognising and avoiding hazards;

Dealing with emergencies.

 

 

 

Module 10     Aviation legislation

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

 

A

B1

B2

10.1   Regulatory Framework

1

1

1

Role of International Civil Aviation Organization;

Role of CASA;

Relationship between Parts 21, 42, 66, 145 and 147 of CASR 1998;

Relationship with other aviation authorities.

 

 

 

10.2   Part 66 Certifying Staff

2

2

2

Detailed understanding of Part 66 of CASR 1998.

 

 

 

10.3   Part 145 – Approved maintenance organisations

2

2

2

Detailed understanding of Part 145 of CASR 1998.

 

 

 

10.4   Air operations

1

1

1

Air Operators’ Certificates;

Operators’ responsibilities, in particular regarding continuing airworthiness and maintenance;

Aircraft maintenance program;

MEL/CDL;

Documents to be carried on board;

Aircraft placarding (markings).

 

 

 

10.5   Certification of aircraft, parts and appliances

2

2

(a)   General

 

 

 

       General understanding of Parts 21, 23, 25, 27 and 29 of CASR 1998;

 

 

 

(b)   Documents

 

 

 

       Certificates of Airworthiness;

       Restricted Certificates of Airworthiness;

       Special Flight Permits;

       Certificates of Registration;

       Noise Certificates;

       Weight Schedules;

       Radio Station Licences and Approvals.

 

 

 

10.6   Continuing airworthiness

2

2

2

(a)

       Detailed understanding of Part 21 of CASR 1998 provisions relating to continuing airworthiness;

(b)

       Detailed understanding of Part 42 of CASR 1998.

 

 

 

10.7   Applicable national and international requirements

 

 

 

(a)

1

2

2

       Management programs, maintenance checks and inspections;

       Master Minimum Equipment Lists, Minimum Equipment List, Dispatch Deviation Lists;

       Airworthiness Directives;

       Service bulletins, manufacturers’ service information;

       Modification and repairs;

       Maintenance documentation: maintenance manuals, structural repair manuals, illustrated parts catalogue, etc.

 

 

 

(b)

1

1

       Continuing airworthiness;

       Minimum equipment requirements — test flights;

       ETOPS, maintenance and dispatch requirements;

       All weather operations: categories 2 and 3 operations.

Module 11A  Turbine aeroplane aerodynamics, structures and systems

 

 

Level of knowledge for the category

 

A1

B1.1

B2

11.1   Theory of flight

 

 

11.1.1   Aeroplane aerodynamics and flight controls

1

2

 

Operation, and effect, of the following:

·         roll control: ailerons and spoilers

·         pitch control: elevators, stabilators, variable incidence stabilisers and canards

·         yaw control, rudder limiters;

Control using elevons, ruddervators;

High-lift devices, slots, slats, flaps, flaperons;

Drag-inducing devices, spoilers, lift dumpers, speed brakes;

Effects of wing fences, sawtooth leading edges;

Boundary layer control, using vortex generators, stall wedges or leading-edge devices;

Operation and effect of trim tabs, balance and anti-balance (leading) tabs, servo tabs, spring tabs, mass balance, control surface bias, aerodynamic balance panels.

 

 

 

11.1.2   High-speed flight

1

2

Speed of sound, subsonic flight, transonic flight, supersonic flight;

Mach number, critical Mach number, compressibility buffet, shockwave, aerodynamic heating, area rule;

Factors affecting airflow in engine intakes of high-speed aircraft;

Effects of sweepback on critical Mach number.

 

 

 

11.2   Airframe structures — general concepts

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Airworthiness requirements for structural strength;

       Structural classification, primary, secondary and tertiary;

       Fail-safe, safe-life and damage-tolerance concepts;

       Zonal and station identification systems;

       Stress, strain, bending, compression, shear, torsion, tension, hoop stress, fatigue;

       Drains and ventilation provisions;

       System installation provisions;

       Lightning-strike protection provision;

       Aircraft bonding;

(b)

1

2

       Construction methods of stressed-skin fuselage, formers, stringers, longerons, bulkheads, frames, doublers, struts, ties, beams, floor structures, reinforcement, methods of skinning, anti-corrosive protection, wing, empennage and engine attachments;

       Structure assembly techniques: riveting, bolting, bonding;

       Methods of surface protection, such as chromating, anodising, painting;

       Surface cleaning;

       Airframe symmetry: methods of alignment and symmetry checks.

11.3   Airframe structures — aeroplanes

 

 

 

11.3.1   Fuselage (ATA52/53/56)

1

2

Construction and pressurisation sealing;

Wing, stabiliser, pylon and undercarriage attachments;

Seat installation and cargo loading system;

Doors and emergency exits: construction, mechanisms, operation and safety devices;

Windows and windscreen construction and mechanisms.

 

 

 

11.3.2   Wings (ATA57)

1

2

Construction;

Fuel storage;

Landing gear, pylon, control surface and high-lift/drag attachments.

 

 

 

11.3.3   Stabilisers (ATA55)

1

2

Construction;

Control surface attachment.

 

 

 

11.3.4   Flight control surfaces (ATA55/57)

1

2

Construction and attachment;

Balancing — mass and aerodynamic.

 

 

 

11.3.5   Nacelles and pylons (ATA54)

1

2

Construction;

Firewalls;

Engine mounts.

 

 

 

11.4   Air-conditioning and cabin pressurisation (ATA21)

 

 

 

11.4.1   Air supply

1

2

Sources of air supply, including engine bleed, APU and ground cart.

 

 

 

11.4.2   Air-conditioning

1

3

Air-conditioning systems;

Air cycle and vapour cycle machines;

Distribution systems;

Flow, temperature and humidity control system.

 

 

 

11.4.3   Pressurisation

1

3

Pressurisation systems;

Control and indication, including control and safety valves;

Cabin pressure controllers.

 

 

 

11.4.4   Safety and warning devices

1

3

Protection and warning devices.

 

 

 

11.5   Instruments and avionic systems

 

 

 

11.5.1   Instrument systems (ATA31)

1

2

Pitot static: altimeter, airspeed indicator, vertical speed indicator;

Gyroscopic: artificial horizon, attitude director, direction indicator, horizontal situation indicator, turn and slip indicator, turn coordinator;

Compasses: direct reading, remote reading;

Angle of attack indication, stall warning systems;

Glass cockpit;

Other aircraft system indication.

 

 

 

11.5.2   Avionic systems

1

1

Fundamentals of system layouts, and operation of the following:

·         Auto flight (ATA22)

·         Communications (ATA23)

·         Navigation systems (ATA34).

 

 

 

11.6   Electrical power (ATA24)

1

3

Batteries installation and operation;

DC-power generation;

AC-power generation;

Emergency-power generation;

Voltage regulation;

Power distribution;

Inverters, transformers, rectifiers;

Circuit protection;

External/ground power.

 

 

 

11.7   Equipment and furnishings (ATA25)

 

 

 

(a)

2

2

       Emergency equipment requirements;

       Seats, harnesses and belts;

 

 

 

(b)

1

1

       Cabin layout;

       Equipment layout;

       Cabin furnishing installation;

       Cabin entertainment equipment;

       Galley installation;

       Cargo handling and retention equipment;

       Airstairs.

 

 

 

11.8   Fire protection (ATA26)

 

 

 

(a)

1

3

       Fire and smoke detection and warning systems;

       Fire extinguishing systems;

       System tests;

 

 

 

(b)

1

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