Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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Plans/Management of Sites & Species as made
This instrument is a heritage management plan for the purposes of protecting and managing the National heritage values of Old Parliament House and Curtilage.
Administered by: Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water
Registered 21 Dec 2021
Tabling HistoryDate
Tabled HR08-Feb-2022
Tabled Senate08-Feb-2022

 

 

Commonwealth Coat of Arms of Australia

 

COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA

 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage National Heritage) Management Plan 2021


I, JAMES BARKER, Assistant Secretary, Heritage Branch, Heritage, Reef and Wildlife Trade Division of the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment, delegate for the Minister for the Environment, acting pursuant to subsection 324S(2) of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, hereby revoke the Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2015-2020 and replace it with the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage National Heritage) Management Plan 2021, to protect and manage the National Heritage values of the National Heritage place, Old Parliament House and Curtilage.

 

This instrument commences on the day after it is registered. Dated this 10th day of November 2021

 

                        JAMES BARKER

………………………………………………... James Barker
Assistant Secretary Heritage Branch
Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage                 1

                                                                     National Heritage) Management Plan 2021

 


 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage National Heritage) Management Plan 2021


Acknowledgements

This is Version 3.0 of the Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan. It is largely based on the previous two versions. Please see Version 1.0 (2008–2013) for a full list of the original contributors.

 

The Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage National Heritage) Management Plan 2021 (Version 3.0) is the result of a review, including public consultation, and an update by staff of the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House.

 

For further information or enquiries regarding this plan, please contact:

 

Deputy Director,

Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House 18 King George Terrace, Parkes ACT 2600

 

www.moadoph.gov.au

 

 

 

Old Parliament House is an agency of the Australian Government.

 

Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan

 

Version 1.0: Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2008–2013 (published 2008) Version 2.0: Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan 2015–2020 (published 2015) Version 3.0: Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage National Heritage) Management Plan 2021 (published 2021)

Documentation Control

The following table documents the development and issue of Version 3.0 of the Heritage Management Plan.

 

Issue

Notes/Description

Issue Date

Prepared By

1

Draft: Design Proof

25 August 2020

Old Parliament House Staff

2

Draft: Incorporating initial edits in preparation for MoAD and public consultation, and initial DAWE review.

10 September 2020

Old Parliament House Staff

3

Draft: Incorporated feedback from review and consultation period; fixed text errors, added text to integrate OPH management strategies, updated Permitted Action Schedule.

13 October 2020

Old Parliament House Staff

4

Final Draft: Including OPH board edits, minor text corrections, for National Heritage Council and second DAWE review.

23 October 2020

Old Parliament House Staff

5

Minor Text and Use corrections in plans; Addition of alternate text for images and plans.

11 February 2021

Old Parliament House Staff

6

Final version for submission.

22 April 2021

Old Parliament House Staff


Foreword

Old Parliament House is of outstanding significance to the nation. As the first purpose built parliament house, it is a physical icon of Australian democracy. It is representative of Australia’s parliamentary political process, and has been a focus for events that reflect Australian democratic values, and political rights and obligations.

 

As home to the Museum of Australian Democracy, Old Parliament House continues to surprise and delight visitors. In this nationally significant building, our vision is to create a vibrant and contemporary hub that empowers civic and individual engagement in the democratic process. This vision will be achieved in harmony with the heritage values of the place that recognise, preserve and communicate the spirit of Australian democracy.

 

The proper conservation and sustainable use of built and cultural heritage is an enduring ambition shared by communities around Australia. The Old Parliament House and Curtilage Heritage Management Plan provides a rigorous management framework for the heritage values of the place. This is the third version of the plan. This update is a result of a review, including a public consultation process, which was undertaken in 2020. The plan meets the requirements for management plans for National and Commonwealth Heritage places, as pursuant to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 and the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Regulations 2000.

 

Old Parliament House staff demonstrate leadership, expertise and innovation in heritage conservation and management. Our award-winning conservation projects have delivered outcomes that recognise the important relationships between heritage conservation, sustainability and access. The management plan is a practical document used by staff to identify, protect, conserve, present and transmit the heritage values of Old Parliament House for current and future generations.

Signature Signature

 

Daryl Karp

Director

Museum of Australian Democracy

The Hon Nick Minchin AO

Chair

Board of Old Parliament House


Executive Summary

On 20 June 2006 the Prime Minister of Australia, the Hon John Howard MP, announced the addition of Old Parliament House and Curtilage to Australia’s National Heritage List. The assessment of the heritage values demonstrated that Old Parliament House and Curtilage had met eight of the nine National Heritage List criteria. Old Parliament House and Curtilage had previously been included in the Commonwealth Heritage List in 2004 and is a significant feature in the Commonwealth Heritage listed Parliament House Vista.

 

Old Parliament House was opened in 1927. It was designed by John Smith Murdoch, the first Commonwealth Government architect, as the first purpose-built home of Australia’s federal Parliament. It is one of the foundation government buildings from the early development of the national capital under the Griffin Plan. Old Parliament House is a substantial building containing some 500 rooms; it houses formal parliamentary Chambers with associated executive offices, parliamentarians’ rooms and functional support spaces. Its complex overlay of National and Commonwealth heritage values are manifested in the fabric, collections, history and intangible associations.

 

Old Parliament House is a Commonwealth-owned property. From July 1996 to November 2007 it was administered by the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts, and from November 2007 to June 2008 it was administered by the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts. In July 2008 Old Parliament House became an Executive Agency. In July 2016 it was reclassified, under the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability Act 2013, as a corporate Commonwealth entity, and became a body corporate. Old Parliament House itself is a Statutory Agency; the curtilage area is administered by the National Capital Authority.

 

Old Parliament House and Curtilage is a heritage site and the home of the Museum of Australian Democracy. The heritage values of the site and the museum’s strategic vision are expressed through an array of interpretation, exhibition, online, learning, research and commercial activities and events available to the public 364 days a year.

 

This Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (Old Parliament House and Curtilage National Heritage) Management Plan 2021 (the Heritage Management Plan) satisfies Old Parliament House’s and the National Capital Authority’s obligations under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (Cth) (EPBC Act). This third version has been updated by Old Parliament House staff. The first version of the plan, published in 2008, was written by Old Parliament House staff with the assistance of heritage consultants and an expert advisory panel.

 

The assessment of heritage values and the Statement of Heritage Significance contained in this plan draw on research undertaken for previous management plans and heritage analyses. The heritage values tables are drawn from the National and Commonwealth Heritage Listings.

 

The plan provides a management and administrative framework, ensuring that all the heritage values are identified, well managed, interpreted and made available for community appreciation and enjoyment. It acts as a manual for Old Parliament House managers and staff to use daily, thereby underpinning and informing management decisions. Through zones, which support the policies, the plan provides a framework for assessment and approval of proposed uses or actions against the heritage values. This ensures effective use and appropriate actions that serve to protect and interpret the heritage values. This framework also provides opportunities for ongoing community involvement.

 

Under the plan there will be continuous monitoring, reporting and, where appropriate or necessary, improvement of the condition of the heritage listed values of Old Parliament House and Curtilage. During the life of this plan there will be an increase in conservation, interpretation, exhibitions, learning and outreach programs associated with both the place and the strategic vision for the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House.

 

This plan will remain in place for five years and will be reviewed and updated as required.


Contents


Acknowledgements................................................................................................................................ 3

Foreword............................................................................................................................................... 4

Executive Summary............................................................................................................................... 5

Description of the plan......................................................................................................................... 10

How to use this plan............................................................................................................................ 11

PART A: CONTEXT............................................................................................................................... 12

1.   Introduction..................................................................................................................................... 13

1.1.    A building for the nation.................................................................................................................. 13

1.2.    Purpose and scope of the plan....................................................................................................... 14

1.3.    Heritage management vision and core principles.............................................................................. 14

1.4.    Key outcomes................................................................................................................................ 15

2.   Description....................................................................................................................................... 17

2.1.    Location......................................................................................................................................... 17

2.1.1. Australia and the Australian Capital Territory...................................................................................................................... 17

2.1.2. Parliamentary Triangle............................................................................................................................................................ 17

2.1.3. Boundaries................................................................................................................................................................................. 19

2.2.    Physical description of the site........................................................................................................ 20

2.2.1. The Building and its Collections (movable items).............................................................................................................. 20

2.2.2. Landscape................................................................................................................................................................................. 21

2.3.    Summary history............................................................................................................................. 21

3.   Heritage Values................................................................................................................................ 24

3.1.    Method of assessment................................................................................................................... 24

3.2.    Summary Statement of Heritage Significance................................................................................... 25

3.3.    Table of values and attributes.......................................................................................................... 26

3.4.    Values management tool: mapped values........................................................................................ 33

3.4.1. Sensitivity of the values to change........................................................................................................................................ 34

3.5.    Condition and integrity of the heritage values................................................................................... 59

PART B: MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK................................................................................................ 60

4.   Statutory Management Frameworks.................................................................................................. 61

4.1.    Background.................................................................................................................................... 61

4.2.    Statutory Listings............................................................................................................................ 61

4.2.1. Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act).............................................................. 61

4.2.2. Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988..................................................................... 62

4.2.3. National Capital Plan 1990..................................................................................................................................................... 62

4.2.4. Parliament Act 1974................................................................................................................................................................. 62

4.2.5. Other codes and guidelines.................................................................................................................................................... 62

5.   The Current Use of the Place............................................................................................................ 64

5.1.    Background.................................................................................................................................... 64

5.2.    Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House management structure............................. 64

5.3.    MoAD Strategic Plan 2018–2023...................................................................................................... 64

5.3.1. MoAD vision............................................................................................................................................................................... 64

5.3.2. MoAD activities and strategic priorities................................................................................................................................. 64

5.4.    Contemporary community stakeholders........................................................................................... 65

6.   Risk Management............................................................................................................................. 66

6.1.    Background.................................................................................................................................... 66

6.2.    Summary of identified pressures on the listed values....................................................................... 66

6.3.    Summary of identified opportunities for the protection of the heritage values.................................... 67

6.4.    The management response.............................................................................................................. 67

7.   Policies............................................................................................................................................ 68

7.1.    Background.................................................................................................................................... 68

7.2.    The Policies.................................................................................................................................... 68

8.   Zones............................................................................................................................................... 84

8.1.    Background.................................................................................................................................... 84

8.1.1. Landmark Zone......................................................................................................................................................................... 84

8.1.2. Chambers Zone........................................................................................................................................................................ 87

8.1.3. Politics and Party Zone............................................................................................................................................................ 89

8.1.4. House of Representatives and Senate Wing Zone............................................................................................................ 91

8.1.5. Ancillary Functions Zone......................................................................................................................................................... 93

8.1.6. Movable Heritage Zone........................................................................................................................................................... 96

9.   Use Plan........................................................................................................................................... 97

9.1.    Background.................................................................................................................................... 97

9.2.    Potential future uses....................................................................................................................... 97

9.3.    Use Plan 2020................................................................................................................................ 97

10.    Monitoring and Review................................................................................................................. 103

10.1.     Monitoring.................................................................................................................................. 103

10.2.     Review........................................................................................................................................ 103

10.2.1. Summary of previous review processes......................................................................................................................... 104

PART C: MANAGEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS.................................................................. 105

11.    Action Proposal Process.............................................................................................................. 106

11.1.     Background................................................................................................................................ 106

11.2.     How to use the Action Proposal Process...................................................................................... 106

11.3.     Documentation............................................................................................................................ 107

11.3.1. Other documentation........................................................................................................................................................... 107

12.    Permitted Action Schedule........................................................................................................... 110

12.1.     Introduction................................................................................................................................. 110

12.2.     Definitions.................................................................................................................................. 110

12.3.     Use plan..................................................................................................................................... 111

12.4.     Permitted Action Schedule........................................................................................................... 111

12.4.1. Collection............................................................................................................................................................................... 111

12.4.2. Equipment (props, sets, building maintenance, conservation, catering, filming, visitors etc)............................... 112

12.4.3. Displays and Exhibitions.................................................................................................................................................... 115

12.4.4. Natural and artificial lighting.............................................................................................................................................. 116

12.4.5. Groups of people................................................................................................................................................................. 117

12.4.6. Hospitality (food and drink)................................................................................................................................................ 118

12.4.7. Events and public programs.............................................................................................................................................. 119

12.4.8. Contractors (caterers, building, filming, events etc)...................................................................................................... 120

12.4.9. Conservation research........................................................................................................................................................ 120

12.4.10. Routine maintenance........................................................................................................................................................ 123

12.4.11. Unscheduled maintenance............................................................................................................................................. 133

12.4.12. Cleaning.............................................................................................................................................................................. 135

13.    Old Parliament House Management Strategies.............................................................................. 141

13.1.     Background and purpose............................................................................................................ 141

13.2.     Development of strategies........................................................................................................... 141

13.3.     Integration of strategies............................................................................................................... 141

14.    Implementation Plan..................................................................................................................... 142

14.1.     Background................................................................................................................................ 142

14.2.     Implementation Plan.................................................................................................................... 142

15.    The Heritage Management Interactive............................................................................................ 147

15.1.     Background................................................................................................................................ 147

PART D: Appendices.......................................................................................................................... 148

Appendix A: Compliance tables.......................................................................................................... 149

Appendix B: National and Commonwealth Heritage List criteria......................................................... 151

Appendix C: Extracts from the National Heritage Listing and the Commonwealth Heritage Listing 153

Appendix D: History of the Place........................................................................................................ 164

Appendix E: The Burra Charter........................................................................................................... 203

Appendix F: Summary of consultation phases................................................................................... 216

Appendix G: Policy rationales and commentaries.............................................................................. 220

Appendix H: Condition of values – details and methodology.............................................................. 227

Appendix I: Sources of information.................................................................................................... 266

Appendix J: Glossary......................................................................................................................... 281


Description of the plan

The content and decision-making tool developed for this Heritage Management Plan is a response to a variety of influences, as outlined in Figure 1.

 

The diagram show three primary areas of influence: statutory requirements (see Chapter 4), MoAD Strategic Plan (see Chapter 5), and heritage sector standards (see Appendix E). The primary influences feed into Part A Context The complexity of the site is another influence that feeds into Part B of the plan: Management Framework. The complexities are: the many and varied uses, its layered history, the building has over 500 rooms, it is a symbolic place in the national memory, and its a place of personal connection.  The fact that OPH is a busy site is an influence that feeds into Part C of the plan: Management and Implementation Tools. Operational requirements of OPH include exhibitions, visitors, learning programs, events, facilities management, conservation, tenants, catering and staff.

Figure 1: Plan influences and structure


How to use this plan

The plan provides a framework to assist staff to make informed decisions about changes to use and actions and activities in and on the place. Decision-making and research for the place should be done using both this plan and management strategy documents, and the associated Heritage Management Interactive that provides links to detailed information about the values and history of specific rooms and collection pieces. Figure 2 briefly outlines some of the ways the plan can be used.

 

Some example activities are outlined with steps for applying the plan. For a school holiday program, tour, or maintenance: Identify room, check zone objective, room values, sensitivity to change, and policies; check Permitted Action Schedule; check relevant OPH management strategy; follow Action Proposal process. For a capital works project: check Implementation Plan; identify room; check zone objective, room values, sensitivity to change, and policies; identify scope; check relevant OPH management strategy; follow Action Proposal process. For an Exhibition: identify exhibition focus; check values and zone objectives; identify room; check Permitted Action Schedule; check relevant OPH management strategy; follow Action Proposal process. For a marketing project: check values; follow Action Proposal process. For a research activity: check introductory pages, contents; choose appropriate part of plan to learn more. For a conservation project: check implementation plan; identify room; check zone objective, room values, sensitivity to change, and policies; identify scope; check Permitted Action Schedule; choose appropriate part of plan to learn more; follow Action Proposal process.

Figure 2: Ways in which to use this plan


PART A: CONTEXT

This section of the plan sets out the context for the management of the heritage values of Old Parliament House.

 

·         Chapter 1: Introduction outlines the purpose and scope of this Heritage Management Plan and articulates the vision for heritage management at Old Parliament House. This chapter outlines the core principles and the outcomes that provide the framework for the plan.

·         Chapter 2: Description describes the place, including its location, its physical description and its history.

·         Chapter 3: Heritage Values describes why this place is significant. It describes the method through which the values have been assessed, and includes a summary statement of significance, relevant extracts from the National Heritage List and the Commonwealth Heritage List; also included are a series of maps that illustrate where the values are located across the place. The current condition of the values is also recorded.


1.  Introduction

1.1.  A building for the nation

Australian democracy values political and social rights and active citizenship for all. It separates the legislative, executive and judicial powers and provides a framework for an inclusive society. Much that is now the essence of democratic practice worldwide has strong roots in Australia – the secret ballot, votes for women, salaried parliamentarians and the principle of constitutional change by majority vote.

 

Old Parliament House provides the physical connection with the long tradition of parliamentary democracy in Australia. It is a place which people can reflect on and be proud of the Australian achievement.

 

The establishment of Old Parliament House was fundamental to the development of Canberra; the opening of Parliament heralded the symbolic birth of the nation’s democratic capital. Parliament is a place where political conflict is inevitable. Old Parliament House stands for the right to argue and express dissent, and for the seven peaceful changes of government that took place during the years in which Parliament sat in the building. These values exemplify the theme of building the Australian nation – thereby creating an Australian democracy.

 

Old Parliament House is a nationally significant heritage place and is one of a select group of places on the National Heritage List.

 

On 20 June 2006 the Hon John Howard MP, Prime Minister of Australia, stated:

 

Old Parliament House will always be an important part of our political history with its rich collection of original furniture, art and memorabilia helping to illustrate the story of Australia’s political customs and functions … It is appropriate that this place of outstanding significance to our nation receives Australia’s most prestigious heritage recognition.

 

Old Parliament House is also recognised on the Commonwealth Heritage List (22 June 2004), the Register of the National Estate (1987, now closed), the National Trust of Australia’s (ACT) Register and the Royal Australian Institute of Architects’ Register of Significant Twentieth Century Architecture.

 

Since 2009 Old Parliament House has been the site for the Museum of Australian Democracy (MoAD). The Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House helps people to understand Australia’s social and political history by interpreting the past and present and by exploring the future. This is achieved by:

 

·         bringing alive the importance of Parliament in the lives of Australians

·         interpreting, conserving and presenting the building and collections

·         providing entertaining and educational public programs about Australian democracy

·         providing a range of other services that enhance the visitor experience.

Old Parliament House hosts an active and busy exhibition program, a range of public programs and events including daily guided tours, and education programs for school students and other interest groups. The place also provides catering for visitors through the Terrace Café and restaurant Hoi Polloi.

 

To most people, the significance of a place arises from a combination of many qualities, such as social and historical ones, and other values derived from these. However, management and statutory obligations require explicit information about each value and its attributes to ensure important values can be conserved and management efforts can be targeted and prioritised.


1.2.  Purpose and scope of the plan

The Heritage Management Plan is a document required by legislation that outlines how the place will be managed in the years ahead. The purpose and scope of this plan is dictated by the requirements for National Heritage listed places under Section 324S of the Environment Protection Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act) and Schedules 5A and 5B of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000 (Regulations) (see Appendix A) and Commonwealth Heritage listed places under Section 341S of the EPBC Act and Schedules 7A and 7B of the Regulations (see Appendix A), and is guided by The Burra Charter: Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance, 2013 (The Burra Charter) (see Appendix E).1

 

The Heritage Management Plan aims to accommodate many of the needs and aspirations that people have for the place and to facilitate their enjoyment and appreciation of the heritage values in a sustainable way. To this end, management seeks to maintain many areas of the place in their pre-1988 physical forms. Decisions concerning the management of use and proposed changes are to be based on an understanding of the heritage values, their sensitivity to change and the results of research, rather than on anecdotal evidence.

 

This management plan will remain in force until a new plan is adopted.

 

1.3.  Heritage management vision and core principles

The vision for heritage management at Old Parliament House is to integrate the conservation and interpretation of heritage values in order to keep the place relevant and vital. Directly or indirectly, all the policies in this plan aim to realise this vision. The provisions of this plan are also based upon a recognition of a broad range of uses and social value linked to these uses.

 

The core principles developed for this plan are intended to build upon the various conservation initiatives established by previous conservation management plans for the place and also to meet the management principles and management plan requirements for Commonwealth and National Heritage listed places.

 

The management policies, strategies and objectives contained in this plan are based on these principles:

 

·         Integrity of the place recognition that the integrity of the heritage values and their attributes are managed through appropriate use, maintenance and change

·         Conservation principles – acknowledgement that the Burra Charter guides the management of the heritage values of the place; in particular, the aspiration of nil decline in condition of heritage values

·         Complexity of heritage values – recognition that a key consideration in management decision making should be the complexity of the heritage values and attributes

·         Limits of acceptable change – acknowledgement that all actions and uses of the place result in some degree of impact and identify the need to manage physical and social impact within thresholds that minimise change/deterioration

·         Community involvement – recognition that the public has a right to participate in the decision-making processes concerning the place (this principle acknowledges the connections between individuals, families, communities and organisations to the place and events that occurred during the life of Parliament in the place)

·         Learning recognition that the role of learning may extend beyond enhancing people’s understanding and appreciation of the values of the place to engendering a sense of personal responsibility for their protection

 

 

 


 

1      ICOMOS stands for the International Council on Museums and Sites.


·         Interpretation – recognition of the necessity to interpret heritage values of the place for their enhancement and longevity

·         Research acceptance of the key role of research in identifying and understanding the heritage values and attributes of the place

·         Adaptive management – acceptance that the Heritage Management Plan policies should be adjusted and refined based on the results of research, monitoring and performance evaluation outcomes

·         Transparency and accountability – recognition that the decision-making processes, monitoring

and lessees and other authorities operating in Old Parliament House should be open to public scrutiny and accountability.

1.4.  Key outcomes

The implementation of the policies in this plan seek to achieve the conservation of the heritage values through the following outcomes:

 

Conservation

Conserve heritage values through:

 

·         protecting, monitoring and maintaining the condition of the heritage values

·         implementing the Burra Charter principles

·         implementing recognised collection management principles

·         ensuring appropriate mechanisms for maintenance

·         mitigating risks through the policies.

Zones

Demonstrate a mechanism for sound ongoing heritage management practices by:

 

·         instilling a respect for the heritage values of all areas of the place through a zoning approach in accordance with the statements of intent and objectives for each zone.

Decision-making

Ensure compliant mechanisms for decision-making through:

 

·         implementing a robust and transparent day-to-day internal process based on the heritage values of the place

·         undertaking research prior to actions to ensure informed decisions are made.

Documentation and reporting

Ensure appropriate records are kept of actions, public reporting of the Implementation Plan and trends in the condition of heritage values through:

 

·         reporting against the Implementation Plan

·         keeping records of actions in a database

·         monitoring and reporting annually

·         assessing the condition of the heritage values of the place every five years.

Interpretation and communication

Achieve appropriate interpretation and communication of the heritage values of the place through:

 

·         facilitating interpretation of spaces in appropriate zones


·         undertaking ongoing promotional activity

·         integrating life-long learning, exhibitions, interpretation, events, research and facilities to assist people to understand, appreciate, enhance and protect the heritage values of the place through the development of the Museum of Australian Democracy

·         developing and maintaining a management partnership with relevant government agencies

·         developing and maintaining a process for community involvement

·         implementing a conflict resolution process.

Use and access

Ensure the public will have access to the place, be kept informed about it and have a voice in its proposed use through:

 

·         implementing mechanisms to facilitate safe public access and use for the purposes of interpretation, learning and social activities as set out in the zones

·         facilitating access to a plan of current uses

·         providing a forum for consultation on proposed future uses.

Acquisitions, disposals and leasing

Meet collections sector standards and statutory requirements through:

 

·         making appropriate provisions for the management and monitoring of leasing arrangements

·         protecting heritage values with appropriate processes should sale, purchase, disposal or leasing of the place (or parts of the place) or items related to or of the place occur.

Human impact

Manage the impacts of use and change through:

 

·         monitoring change

·         modifying use to keep change to within acceptable limits

·         implementing mechanisms for users to increase awareness of heritage values and minimise the impact on those values.

Environmental management

Engender sound environmental practices through:

 

·         applying appropriate environmental stewardship principles by demonstrating an understanding and willingness to assist with the care and protection of the broader environment

·         ensuring consistency with Parliament House Vista Management Plan and the National Capital Plan 1990

·         ensuring mechanisms to protect the place and its environmental envelope

·         putting in place processes for business continuity and disaster management.


2.  Description

2.1.  Location

2.1.1.  Australia and the Australian Capital Territory

Old Parliament House is situated in Canberra in the Australian Capital Territory which is surrounded by the state of New South Wales. Canberra is 150 kilometres inland from the coast, 287 kilometres from Sydney and 660 kilometres from Melbourne. Canberra is the seat of the Australian Federal Government.

 

Old Parliament House is in the suburb of Parkes, bounded by King George Terrace to the north, Queen Victoria Terrace to the south and Parliament Square to the east and west.

 

2.1.2.  Parliamentary Triangle

There are a number of important relationships between the building and its wider setting. Old Parliament House sits in an important and extensive landscape stretching between Mount Ainslie and Capital Hill. As a result, Old Parliament House has a strong relationship to Parkes Place, which is the area between it and Lake Burley Griffin and includes the reflection ponds and components of the National Rose Gardens. It has a strong relationship with the flanking Senate Garden and House of Representatives Garden, both of which were integral to the social development of the place and were private gardens frequently used by parliamentarians and their families during the time that Old Parliament House was a functioning parliament.

 

Figure 3: Map of Australia and the Australian Capital Territory

The map indicates Old Parliament Houses location close to Lake Burley Griffin and Canberra City in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). The map shows the ACTs regional centres, rivers, and the main highways including the Federal Highway leading to Sydney, and the Barton Highway leading to Melbourne. There is an inset map showing the location of the ACT in relation to Sydney and Melbourne and all of Australia.


Old Parliament House has an historical and architectural relationship to the former two Secretariat buildings (East Block and West Block), and there is a relationship to the Aboriginal Tent Embassy located on King George Terrace. The encircling roads and garden areas immediately adjacent to the building are part of the practical and significant curtilage of the building.

 

The aerial view from the north east includes the Parliamentary Triangle. Labels on the photograph indicate Australian Parliament House, the Old Parliament House Gardens, the Aboriginal Tent Embassy in Parkes Place, and Reconciliation Place. The map, oriented to match the photograph, also shows the locations of the High Court, the National Gallery of Australia, and the National Library of Australia, all in close proximity to Old Parliament House.

Figure 4: Aerial photograph and map showing the location of Old Parliament House


2.1.3.  Boundaries

This plan includes the building and its collections to the outer edges of the built structure, the internal gardens and the surrounding area (up to the central line of the perimeter roadways). The various management and legal boundaries within this area are outlined below and in Figure 5.

 

1.        Old Parliament House boundary administered by Old Parliament House (as a Statutory Agency):

all elements contained within and on the exterior walls and to the ground level steps, the front Façade garden to the footpath, the East and West Façade gardens (the partially enclosed pocket gardens), the rear cooling enclosures, and the East and West bridges at the rear of the building. The National Capital Authority administered area: all roads, gardens and footpaths from the ground level steps or exterior walls of Old Parliament House outwards excluding those areas administered by Old Parliament House (the front Façade garden to the footpath, the East and West Façade gardens, the rear cooling enclosures, and the East and West bridges at the rear of the building).

2.        National Heritage List boundary: ‘About 2.5ha, King George Terrace, Parkes, comprising the area bounded by the centre lines of King George Terrace, Queen Victoria Terrace and Parliament Square, and including all of Sections 39, 42, 43 and 50 Parkes.’2

3.        Commonwealth Heritage List boundary: ‘About 2.5ha, comprising that area bounded by King George Terrace, Queen Victoria Terrace and Parliament Square, Parkes.’3

The boundaries, as described, are marked in three colours overlaying an aerial photograph of Old Parliament House and the roads immediately surrounding it.

Figure 5: Management boundaries of Old Parliament House and Curtilage

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

2      Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No. S198, 2 October 2007, p. 2.

3      ibid.


2.2.  Physical description of the site

2.2.1.  The Building and its Collections (movable items)

Old Parliament House is a large three-storey rendered brick building with the main floor on the intermediate level. The strong horizontal pattern of the white painted main façade is symmetrical and features four original bays with arched bronze windows, verandahs and balconies enclosed with glass and end bays which are stepped forward, creating a rhythm of stepped cornices and parapets. The balanced masses of the Senate and House of Representatives Chambers rise above the surrounding offices and other rooms.

 

The building has strong symmetrical planning based around a number of major spaces. The major axis through the building, aligned with the Land Axis of the Parliamentary Triangle, features a series of spaces: King’s Hall, Parliamentary Library and the Dining Rooms. The cross-axis features the Senate and House of Representatives Chambers, which are placed symmetrically either side of King’s Hall. All of these spaces are on the main or intermediate level. Surrounding these spaces are many smaller meeting rooms, offices and other service areas which are placed on the lower ground, main and upper floors.

 

There are two enclosed courtyards, located between the North Wing of the building and the South Wing. Dining Rooms are features of the South Wing. A vestige of the Library courtyard also survives as a link between the larger courtyards.

 

The original flat concrete and membrane roofs have been covered with low-pitched metal roofs.

 

Old Parliament House has undergone many changes over its life (see plans in Appendix D). There have been major additions to the building on both sides, front and back (the south-east, south-west, north-east and north-west wings), which contain many offices and meeting rooms. These have generally maintained the construction, external finish, height and rhythm of the façade but have changed the mass of the building.

 

These extensions house the Prime Minister’s Suite and President of the Senate’s Suite. Other changes include the enclosure of verandahs and balconies. There have also been changes to, and loss of, original finishes in many rooms, though not the major spaces.

 

Major interior spaces of architectural interest include: King’s Hall, Library, Senate Chamber, House of Representatives Chamber, Members’ Dining Rooms and Bar, Senate Opposition Party Room, Speaker’s Suite, Clerk of the Senate’s Office, Leader of the Government in the Senate’s Suite, Prime Minister’s Office, Cabinet Room, and the President of the Senate’s Suite. The interiors feature impressive Tasmanian blackwood finishes.

 

The contents of Old Parliament House include furniture, signs, light fittings, carpets, office furnishings and equipment. Many of these items have been retained in their original locations. Significant among the collection are items presented to Provisional Parliament House to mark the opening of the building in 1927 and the large collection of original furniture and fittings specifically designed for the building and installed that year. Subsequent additions to the original collection document important stages in the adaptation of the building to meet the ever-increasing demand to accommodate more members and their staff. This process continued until the relocation of the Australian Parliament to the new Parliament House, where new specially commissioned furniture and fittings were provided.

 

The collection of contents in Old Parliament House also includes fittings and fabric which have become disassociated from their original location or function.

 

Old Parliament House is an example of the Inter-War Stripped Classical style of architecture. Key features of the style displayed by the building include a symmetrical façade, division into vertical bays indicating classical origins, vestigial classical entablature, simple surfaces, and spandrels between storeys that have been subdued to emphasise verticality. Some of the 1927 interior furnishings include timber wall panelling, division clocks, feature carpets in the Chambers and feature rubber and parquetry flooring in the Lobbies, and built-in sink, coat and locker cupboards and bookshelves. Some of the interior features added during the


refurbishments and extensions in the 1970s include: timber wall and ceiling panels; roped wallpaper; and built-in desk units.

 

The building is surrounded by garden areas, footpaths, car parks and roads. The garden areas are generally either rose gardens, trees or lawn.

 

To the north or front of the building is an area sometimes called the forecourt; it comprises a wide internal roadway with parking on either side and garden areas adjacent to the building. This area is separated from King George Terrace by a garden bed, retaining wall and footpath. Between the forecourt and King George Terrace, at either end, are two modern (post-1988) rendered masonry pillars which display information signs about Old Parliament House.

 

2.2.2.  Landscape

The central area of Canberra is an extensive cultural landscape comprising buildings, roads, parks and a lake. The area is designated for parliamentary and national capital uses.

 

The major features of the area include the current Parliament House with its gardens and paved areas, State Circle road cutting (geological feature), Old Parliament House and gardens, East and West Blocks, John Gorton Building (formerly Administrative Building), National Gallery of Australia, High Court of Australia, Questacon: The National Science and Technology Centre, National Library of Australia, Treasury Building, National Rose Gardens, King George V Memorial, Aboriginal Tent Embassy, Parkes Place, Reconciliation Place, Australian War Memorial, Central Basin of Lake Burley Griffin, the series of memorials along Anzac Parade, Aspen Island and the Carillion, King’s Park, HMAS Canberra Memorial, Merchant Navy Memorial, Blundell’s Cottage, Commonwealth Park, Regatta Point exhibition building and restaurant, Captain Cook Memorial water jet, National Police Memorial, and extensive mature plantings and avenues of trees, such as those along Anzac Parade and the Peace Park and waterfront promenade. The area also includes fountains, roads, car parks, landscaped areas, a restaurant, kiosk and the residence of the Catholic Archbishop.

 

The Central National Area has a strong sense of symmetry based on the Land Axis. Parliament House, Old Parliament House and the Australian War Memorial are all located on the axis. In addition, the landscape features of Federation Mall, Parkes Place (the landscape feature not the roads) and Anzac Parade are also located on the axis. These places form part of the Parliament House Vista, a place on the Commonwealth Heritage List. Other major features in the area are generally balanced about the axis, such as East and West Blocks, the gardens of Old Parliament House, the eastern and western parts of the National Rose Gardens, the Administrative and Treasury Buildings, the National Gallery/High Court group

and the National Library/Questacon group, as well as the Carillion and the Captain Cook Memorial water jet. The road system also generally reflects the symmetrical planning of the area based on the Land Axis.

 

2.3.  Summary history

The architect of Old Parliament House, and the politicians and public servants who supervised and advised him, planned a building which would meet the needs of the federal Parliament for at least 50 years; they largely succeeded, even though major changes to the use of parts of the building began within a few years, and within a decade overcrowding had become an issue. The building proved to be adaptable and always remained hospitable, despite the number of users soaring well past what had been predicted and the nature of their work changing in ways unimaginable in the 1920s. The complex interplay of space and function at Old Parliament House, with both consistent and changing uses of spaces, mirrors the rich political and parliamentary history of Australia between 1927 and 1988. Largely intact and with a well-documented history, Old Parliament House is a unique artefact of Australia’s twentieth-century political heritage.

 

Although planning for the new capital began in 1912, infrastructure work had hardly begun when the First World War broke out in August 1914. Burdened by huge war debts, Billy Hughes’ post-war government needed to move to Canberra quickly and cheaply, and therefore decided to build a ‘Provisional House’. The design task went to John Smith Murdoch, Chief Architect in the Department of Works. The discussion of his first proposal by the Parliamentary Standing Committee on Public Works in 1923, with evidence from a wide


range of experts including the presiding officers of the day, constitutes a key document for understanding how Parliament functioned at the time.

 

Construction began in 1923, and was completed in 1927. Five million bricks made at the Yarralumla brickworks went into the building, along with 2000 tons of cement. Australian timbers were used, sourced from every Australian state except South Australia. Construction cost £644,600, and another £250,000 was spent on fit-out: a substantial sum, but not much more than the £478,449 allocated in the 1926–27 budget for the costs of running Parliament for one year.

 

Although Murdoch included offices for the Ministry, it was planned to locate the Prime Minister’s principal office and the Cabinet Room, along with a small nucleus of staff from major departments, in a separate building known as the Secretariat (now West Block). This was a temporary measure pending construction of an administration building, which would house most of the public service when it moved from Melbourne.

The Great Depression, which began in 1929, made these plans redundant, and the major move of public servants did not begin until the 1950s. Hence, over subsequent decades, ministers and their staff stayed in the building, becoming a major source of overcrowding as Parliament House also became the heart of executive government in Australia. It was probably the political tensions of the Depression years, however, which induced Prime Minister James Scullin to leave the Secretariat for his small suite at Parliament House; cramped it may have been, but it was close to the Labor Party Room and the Chambers. Every subsequent Prime Minister has worked in similar proximity.

 

Other significant changes also followed the election of the Scullin Government in 1929. The defeated Country Party moved out of the Third Party Room on the Government side of the House of Representatives into the Opposition Party Room in the Senate, the room was divided and two senior ministers and their staff moved in. The erstwhile party room later became the office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

 

Whether in government or not, the Country Party and its successors thereafter operated from the Senate Opposition lobby. As a result, in about 1938, when the Senate Club became the Senate Opposition Party Room, it was tacitly recognised that the ideal of senators meeting across party lines to represent the interests of their states was waning in the face of the party system.

 

Although pressure on accommodation grew through the 1930s, with complaints that the party rooms were unsuitable working spaces for backbenchers, it was the growth of government during the Second World War which produced the first major additions. Two-storey wings were added to each side in 1943, principally to provide ministerial accommodation but also a few offices for private members and senators. This broke the connection between the internal garden courts and the rose gardens on either side of the House. Meanwhile, conversions of verandahs and loggias into offices continued. The building had reached ‘saturation point’, the Serjeant-at-Arms reported in 1940, and the wings only provided momentary respite. In 1948 a further floor was added to the new wings, which were themselves extended. One factor in this expansion was the growth in the number of parliamentarians in 1948, which for the first time took the size of the Parliament beyond what had been predicted in the 1920s. Because parliamentarians had individual seats, the Chambers themselves became crowded with seats and desks. Demand for offices meant that even though two new outer wings were added to the 1940s extensions in 1965 (House of Representatives) and 1970 (Senate), many backbenchers were forced to share their tiny rooms with each other and with their staff. In 1970 four rooms even had three members sharing them.

 

These issues, the constant growth in the size of ministerial staff, and the substantial cost of maintaining an ageing building, revived the issue of the need for a permanent Parliament House after 1956. An extension of the north wing of the building in 1972 created only a modest new Prime Minister’s suite along with a larger Cabinet Room and new accommodation downstairs for the Treasurer (in the space where Hansard had previously been located). Matching works gave the President of the Senate a small new suite and created a large committee room downstairs, which was in constant use as the Senate committee system grew; it also provided space for press conferences. Security also became an issue in the 1970s. Blast screens over some windows and a new security-screened entry under the front steps were stopgaps, and the need for new


communications facilities created further problems. The provision of secure wiring for an ageing building, in which much of Australia’s defence, foreign policy and security decisions were made, proved difficult, and the media, forced to crowd into a warren of shabby rooms on the top floor of the building, also needed new facilities. In 1983 Prime Minister Bob Hawke laid the foundation stone for a new Parliament House, which the Queen opened in 1988. After 61 years, much as had been predicted in the 1920s, the time had come for Old Parliament House to move into a new era of its eventful history.

 

A full history can be found in Appendix D.


3.  Heritage Values

3.1.  Method of assessment

The extensive research on the political, social and construction history of Old Parliament House (see Appendix D) has provided a comprehensive body of work from which several Statements of Significance have been developed.4 These Statements of Significance, along with the analysis of the heritage values for the National Heritage List and the Commonwealth Heritage List, formed the basis for the current Statement of Heritage Significance. Figure 6 shows the process undertaken to assess the heritage values.

 

The process starts with Old Parliament House listed on the Register of the National Estate in 1987, followed by independent research and assessment of heritage significance in the development of a Conservation Management Plan in the year 2000.  Additional independent detailed heritage analyses on specific areas (see Appendix I) was incorporated into nominations for the Commonwealth Heritage list in 2004, and the National Heritage List in 2006.  The Australian Heritage Council assessed the nominations, and the decision by the Minister for the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, was made to add Old Parliament House to these two heritage lists. Public comment and input from an Expert Advisory Panel were part of the process that led to the current Statement of Heritage Significance at Appendix C.

Figure 6: Process for assessing the heritage values of Old Parliament House

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

4      Pearson, M, Betteridge, M, Marshall, D, O’Keefe, B, and Young, L, 2000, Old Parliament House Conservation Management Plan 2000, prepared for the Department of Communications, Information Technology and the Arts, and subsequent studies. This is the Conservation Management Plan 2000 (discussed more fully in Appendix G).


3.2.  Summary Statement of Heritage Significance

Old Parliament House has outstanding heritage values shaped by its pivotal role in the political and social history of Australia and is an important place in the evolution of Australian democracy (Criterion A). Old Parliament House possesses outstanding heritage values related to its history, design, location, collection of movable items, social values and associations.

 

As the original location of the Australian Parliament in Canberra, Old Parliament House symbolises and reflects the development of Australia as a nation, and was the first purpose-built home for the Australian Parliament (Criterion A). Old Parliament House was witness to 61 years of Australian legislature, with a myriad of associated events. It was also central to the development of Canberra, the opening of Parliament heralding the symbolic birth of the nation’s capital (Criterion A). It has become a national icon, symbolic of the Commonwealth Government in Australia, and of Canberra itself, for many generations of Australians (Criterion A).

 

The building occupies a prominent and strategic location at the southern end of the main Land Axis of Walter Burley Griffin’s city design, and contributes to the planned aesthetic qualities of the Parliamentary Triangle (Criteria D and E). Its setting – primarily the gardens, circling roads and parking areas – was integral to the style and use of the place (Criteria E and G).

 

Old Parliament House was intimately associated with the course and pattern of the nation’s political, social and historical development from its opening in 1927 until 1988 (Criterion A). The Senate and House of Representatives Chambers and Kings Hall have been the venues for significant events in the shaping of Australia’s democratic history and traditions (Criterion A). The layout of each chamber provides an insight into the workings of the Australian Parliament (Criterion A). Apart from serving as the seat of Parliament, the building bears witness to the demands of accommodating the executive arm of government within the legislature’s sphere, making it rare among parliamentary buildings in Australia and in other parts of the western world (Criterion B).

 

Old Parliament House represents a significant creative achievement. Although intended as a provisional structure, it was designed as a simple yet dignified building, endowed with appropriate aesthetic and formal qualities for its location and function (Criterion E). Old Parliament House exemplifies the Inter-War Stripped Classical style of architecture and is the most prominent instance of the work of the Commonwealth’s first government architect, John Smith Murdoch (Criteria D, F and H).

 

The design of the building, with its complementary fixtures and fittings – including Australian timber panelled walls, raked galleries, Australian timber and leather furniture, suspended light fittings, high coffered ceilings, parquet floors, skylights and clerestory windows – demonstrates the customs and functions of the Commonwealth Parliament (Criteria D, E, and F). The former Members’ Private Dining Room contains the remains of rare 1927 hand-painted wall features (Criterion B). The furniture and internal fabric of Old Parliament House reflect the everyday use of the building over more than six decades and the hierarchical nature of parliamentary staffing practices (Criterion A). Research to date indicates that the furniture in Old Parliament House is part of a rare, intact surviving record of heritage fabric comprising both furniture and documentation (Criterion B). The significant collection comprises original documentary evidence, including plans, photographs and files that directly relate to the design, construction, changes and use, and provide important historical research information (Criterion C). Specific spaces of the building are directly linked with events that shaped Australia’s political and social history, and have strong associations with prominent Australians, including Prime Ministers and parliamentarians who served between 1927 and 1988 (Criteria A and H).

 

Many surviving parliamentarians, support staff and media representatives have strong associations with the building and its contents (Criterion G). Its choice as the venue for important events, such as the Constitutional Convention 1998, also indicates its contemporary social value (Criterion G). The ongoing relationship with the Aboriginal Tent Embassy, established in 1972, is unique in western democracy


(Criterion B). The entrance, as a venue for many demonstrations, reflects the role of protest in the history of Old Parliament House (Criterion A).

 

The use of Australian materials and labour in the building of Old Parliament House and the manufacture of its contents contributes to the promotion of a sense of national identity (Criterion A). This national identity is complemented with the inclusion in the collection of the President of the Senate’s Chair, presented by the Dominion of Canada, and the Speaker’s Chair, presented by the United Kingdom Branch of the Empire Parliamentary Association, as indicative of the relationships that bind the Commonwealth of Nations (Criterion A).

 

For these reasons, Old Parliament House has outstanding heritage values that consolidate its place in Australia’s political and social history.

 

3.3.  Table of values and attributes

When listing a place on the Commonwealth or National Heritage List, the Australian Heritage Council makes an assessment of the place and advises the minister with responsibility for heritage of the values that the place holds. Places on the National Heritage List have been shown to possess values rated as outstanding against the criteria; places on the Commonwealth Heritage List are places managed by the Commonwealth that have been shown to have values rated as significant against the criteria.

 

This table shows how the attributes of the place – either tangibly in the physical fabric or intangibly in the associations and uses – support the National and Commonwealth Heritage listed values of Old Parliament House (refer to the Glossary in Appendix J).

 

The text is taken from the citations published by the Commonwealth agency responsible for administering the EPBC Act at the time of the listings (see Appendix C for citations).

 

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Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

Criterion A: Events, Processes

Old Parliament House as the  Provisional Parliament House was the first purpose-built home for the Australian Parliament. It was central to the development of Australia as a nation from its opening in 1927 until the opening of the new Parliament House in 1988 and demonstrates Australia’s [parliamentary] political process.

Old Parliament House is a site that has provided a physical focus for events that reflect Australian democratic values, and political and social rights. It also stands for the right to argue and dissent, and reflects the orderly succession of governments through the democratic process, as reflected by the seven changes of government that took place during the years in which Parliament sat in the building.

The building set the pattern of combining the functions of the executive arm of government and the legislative function in the one building. This commenced with the provision of ministerial offices at the design stage followed by Prime Minister James Scullin moving Cabinet meetings into the building in 1930–31. These actions initiated the major expansion of the building to house both the legislative and executive functions of government, a pattern that continued in the design of Parliament House.

 

Australia’s first federal Parliament building was designed as the grandest element and central focus of a fully planned capital city. Old Parliament House is a place of outstanding heritage values related to its history, design, landscape context, interiors, furnishings, courtyards and gardens, collection of movable items, social values and associations.

As the original focus of the Commonwealth Parliament and Government in Canberra, Old Parliament House is intimately associated with the political history of Australia, and the development of Canberra as the capital of Australia, from its opening in 1927 until the opening of the new Parliament House in 1988. The Old Parliament House was the second home of the Parliament which was located in the Victorian Parliament House in Melbourne from Federation in 1901 until 1927, and was the first purpose-built home for the Australian Parliament.


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Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

The North Wing has historic importance as the main venue for parliamentary functions from 1927 to 1988. The Senate Chamber, House of Representatives Chamber, and King’s Hall are highly significant as venues for the debates, petitions and votes associated with 61 years of Australian legislature.

Old Parliament House is an important place in the story of the creation of the Australian democracy and has associations with several related defining events. Landmark political events associated with the building included legislation in 1942 adopting the Statute of Westminster 1931 and the declarations of war in 1939 and 1941. The building was also the place of 61 years of national legislation shaping Australian society, the extension of the voting age to 18-year-olds in 1973, and the establishment of new political parties such as the Democratic Labour Party in 1950s, the Australian Democrats in 1977 and the Liberal Party of Australia in 1944–45.

 

Old Parliament House saw the growth of Commonwealth responsibility for Aboriginal affairs.  Key  events included the Bark Petition sent by the Yirrkala community to the House of Representatives in August 1963 protesting bauxite mining in Arnhem Land, and the Referendum in 1967 that overwhelmingly supported Commonwealth power to legislate for Aboriginal people. Amongst other developments, the Referendum result led to the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, proclaimed on Australia Day 1977. With the new responsibilities arising from the 1967 Referendum, the Commonwealth Parliament became the focus of Aboriginal political protest. The siting of the Aboriginal Tent Embassy outside Parliament House in 1972 was a part of this protest.

 

The front façade of Old Parliament House and the immediate grassed area to its north have been the   scene of numerous events, gatherings, protests and demonstrations. Significant events included the formal opening of the Provisional Parliament House in 1927 and the address by the former Prime Minister, Gough Whitlam, on the front steps of the building after his dismissal by the Governor-General, Sir John Kerr, in November 1975.

Old Parliament House, in particular King’s Hall and Chambers, has been the venue of important ceremonial events including the public mourning for the deaths of Prime Minister John Curtin in 1945 and former Prime Minister Ben Chifley in 1951; state receptions held in honour of Queen Elizabeth II in 1954 and 1963; and events associated with royal visits in 1927, 1935, 1945, 1954,

1963, 1974 and 1977.

Old Parliament House has a richness of internal fabric and collections that convey the way in which parliamentary functions were conducted and the everyday use of the building. In particular, these features include the purpose-designed furniture and furnishings that maintained their original setting and purpose for over sixty years.

Old Parliament House was the venue for and witnessed both the course and pattern of the nation’s political, social and historical development  through the major part of the life of the Commonwealth to date. The movable items associated with the building are also intimately associated with these events.

Apart from serving as the seat of Commonwealth Parliament, the building bears witness to the physical encroachment of the executive arm of government into the legislature’s proper sphere. This was the primary cause for the extensive additions and modifications that had to be made to the building. These additions and modifications are manifested in such elements as the southeast and southwest wings, the northeast and northwest front pavilions, and a great number of internal changes.

The relocation of the Parliament to Canberra was the focus of an intense period of development of the nation’s


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Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

King’s Hall and the Chambers have features that reflect both the austerity of the time and a dignified formality.

These features include the decorative skylights, elegant pendant lights, and parquet flooring, as well as the high ceilings accentuated by the raked galleries,  the  timber wall panelling, and the extensive, restrained and subtle decoration. The Hall features bas-relief busts of prominent personalities (related to Federation, the judiciary and of the first Parliament in 1901) on its colonnades, and portraits of former prime ministers as well as  a  statue  of  King George V. The Chambers demonstrate (through their fabric, furnishing and objects) the growth of Parliament over 61 years, including the evolution of communications technology applied to the reporting of parliamentary debates and events to all Australians.

Significant furniture of Old  Parliament  House  includes the John Smith Murdoch designed furniture and fittings; the HMAS Australia table; the Country Party Table (Murdoch’s original cabinet table from West Block)  and the Cabinet table (used by the Whitlam, Fraser and Hawke Cabinets). Furniture items which underlie the significance of Australia’s role initially as a member of the British Empire and later as a member of the Commonwealth of Nations include the President of the Senate’s Chair (presented by the Dominion of Canada) and the Speaker’s Chair (presented by the United Kingdom Branch of the Empire Parliamentary Association).

capital. The opening of Parliament heralded the symbolic birth of Canberra as the capital. The intended importance of Old Parliament House is reflected in its design, its prominent siting in the landscape of the Parliamentary Triangle, and in the treatment of the areas around Old Parliament House, particularly the Senate and House of Representatives Gardens, and the National Rose Gardens.

Furniture and fittings designed or purchased for the extension or alterations to the building, including those items associated with the Senate and House of Representative Wings and the President of the Senate and Prime Minister’s suites are of particular value.

Old Parliament House has a rare record (documented in the Old Parliament House) which is made up of both furniture and a variety of documents related to the furniture. The documents include initial design concepts, specifications, quotes and detailed drawings for manufacture.

The Old Parliament House Library is of heritage significance, in particular, the remaining features of the original library and the later additions or changes to the library up to and including the 1958 extension are of value.

 

Criterion B: Rarity

Old Parliament House is uncommon in that it housed both the legislative and executive functions of government. This is reflected in the construction of the House of Representatives (southeast) and the Senate (southwest) Wings, the front pavilions and in a great number of internal changes.

The House of Representatives Wing provides extensive and relatively intact evidence of the accommodation provided for members and ministers at various periods and the working conditions of parliamentarians and staff over the period 1943–88.

 

Among parliamentary buildings in Australia and in other parts of the western world, Old Parliament House is an uncommon place in that it eventually housed both the legislative and executive functions of government.

Research carried out to date suggests that the furniture in Old Parliament House is part of a rare, intact surviving record comprising both furniture and documentation. The

documentation (held by others) relates to initial design concepts, specifications,


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Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

The former Members’ Private Dining Room contains the remains of the 1927 hand-painted wall features. These decorative features are rare. They are the only examples of these features in the building and are also rare within the ACT.

There are important records of both furniture and its documentation relating to initial design concepts, specifications, quotes and detailed drawings for manufacture.

quotes and detailed drawings for manufacture of items.

Criterion C: Research

Old Parliament House has a significant collection of documents which are associated with the place. This collection is an important source of historical information. The documents include plans, photographs and files that are directly related to the design, construction, use, and alteration of the Chambers and King’s Hall. An inventory  of the collection is documented in Old Parliament House.

 

N/A

Criterion D: Principal characteristics of a class of places

Old Parliament House is a primary example of the Inter- War Stripped Classical style of architecture. This style was dominant in Canberra’s government architecture of the 1920s–1940s. It is also an example of how this style was varied in Canberra during the 1920s–1940s. This style variation was a major stylistic feature of Federal Capital Architecture in Canberra.

The Inter-War Stripped Classical style of architecture was varied to include the influence of Garden City ideals. In the case of Old Parliament House, this included courtyards with loggias and pergolas, verandahs, internal courtyards and adjacent gardens. Despite these influences the central stylistic expression of the building retained its classical orderliness.

The characteristics of the building’s style and their expression in Old Parliament House’s exterior and interior, are due to the design work of the Commonwealth’s first government architect, John Smith Murdoch. Murdoch’s design is modest, embracing classical symmetry and forms, having balanced masses with projected bays with arched bronze framed windows. The architectural detail between the storeys (spandrels) also emphasises the verticality of the elevations.

Old Parliament House and its curtilage also forms the central feature of a precinct. This precinct includes the two Secretariat buildings (East and West Blocks), the Old Parliament House Gardens, Constitutional and Magna Carta Places and the National Rose Gardens. There is some commonality in the design of early buildings within this precinct. This precinct reflects a period when there was an increase in Commonwealth Government power and an increase in the public’s interest in Canberra.

 

Old Parliament House is a good example of the Inter-War Stripped Classical style of architecture.

The building reflects the embracing of classical symmetry and forms without the adoption of the  full classical vocabulary and in this way it expresses a modest but refined architectural style. Key features of the style displayed  by  the  building include: symmetrical facade, division into vertical bays indicating classical origins, vestigial classical entablature (being the horizontal decoration towards the top  of the walls including the cornice), simple surfaces and spandrels (the  panel between the top of a window on a lower level and the bottom of a window on a higher level) between storeys subdued to emphasise verticality.

The essential character and symmetry of Old Parliament

House have remained intact despite several substantial additions. The design of the building and its layout, its

The essential character and symmetry of

Old Parliament House have remained intact despite several substantial additions. The


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Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

curtilage spaces and its interior rooms all demonstrate the customs and functions of the Commonwealth Parliament.

The building’s  Chambers reflect the  roles of the House of Representatives and the Senate. The seating arrangements particularly indicate the formal and adversarial nature of debate. The Public and Press Galleries illustrate the nature of public and press access to formal Parliamentary processes. This access is further demonstrated by the spaces allocated to the recording of Parliamentary sittings. The presence of Executive Government staff indicate the major involvement of the Executive in the processes of Parliament in Australia.

The House of Representatives Wing  comprises  two blocks constructed in three phases:  1943,  1949  and 1965. The Senate Wing comprises two blocks and these were constructed in three phases: 1943, 1949 and 1972. These building Wings retain much of their internal layout and some fittings. They  are  an  unusual  physical record of the difficult working conditions of parliamentarians, staff and press representatives over the period 1943– 88.

Early surviving interiors of the  building  include  King’s Hall, the Library, Senate Chamber, House of Representatives Chamber, Dining Rooms, Senate Opposition Party Room, Ministerial Party Room, Clerk of the Senate’s Office, Members’ Bar, Senate Government Party Room and Leader of the Government in the Senate’s Suite.

design of the building and its spaces, and the movable items associated with its operations demonstrate the customs and functions of the Commonwealth Parliament. The divisions within Parliament and the hierarchical system of government are reflected in the categories and styles of both the rooms and furniture available to individuals of different status.

King’s Hall and the Chambers are important for reflecting the austerity of the times and the building’s style. The rooms tend to be simple spaces with little decoration and have subtle and repeated classical references. For example, the use of Greek key patterning is evident in the Chambers and in the external metal and rendered balustrades. Some of the rooms have a certain grandeur resulting from generously proportioned spaces with clerestory windows. The use of timber for wall or ceiling panelling and furniture also distinguishes some rooms.

These variations in interior detail highlight the hierarchy of parliament.

The importance given to the Parliamentary Library as a source of information for Parliament is demonstrated by its position within the building. The key positional features are its location on the central axis of the building, its close proximity to both Chambers and its access to and from King’s Hall. Its designated importance is also demonstrated by the design and fit-out of the Library rooms which feature extensive timber panelling and fittings. These fittings were normally reserved for high-status spaces such as the Chambers, the Party Rooms, and office holders’ rooms.

The building is also of interest for surviving features consistent with, if not influenced by, Garden City ideals. These features include the courtyards with loggias and

pergolas and the courtyards with verandahs. These features express aspects of the garden city principles and

 


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Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

in particular the typical linking of internal spaces with the landscape setting. The adjacent Senate and House of Representatives gardens are a part of this landscape setting. These gardens have been substantially redeveloped but they contain the original garden layout.

 

Criterion E: Aesthetic characteristics

Old Parliament House is an iconic national landmark that has a major role in the symbolic physical representation of democracy in the Parliamentary Triangle. This landmark importance has been strengthened by the setting and design of the new Parliament House building. These two buildings are read together as part of the land axis vista and they are also a part of the planned aesthetic qualities of the Parliamentary Triangle.

Old Parliament House is a major component of public and familiar views of Canberra. In particular, Old Parliament House is appreciated for its crisp lines, stark white colour, pronounced vertical patterns and classical form. It makes a major contribution as a viewpoint towards the Australian War Memorial and in the other direction to Parliament House.

The building is highly valued by the Australian community. This value is reflected in the popularity of its image, as documented in countless tourist and other imagery. These popular images include those made since the construction of Parliament House, completed in 1988.

These post-1988 images of Old Parliament House are enhanced by the presence of Parliament House.

 

The Old Parliament House is an important landmark in Canberra, Australia’s national capital. It is part of the significant cultural landscape of the Parliamentary Triangle, partly reflecting Griffin’s design which placed the Government Group of buildings in this corner of the Triangle. This scheme represents in physical form on the ground the conception of the principal components of parliamentary government – the legislative, executive and judicial – the strict separation of these components and the hierarchical relationship between them. Old Parliament House is highly significant as an integral part of this scheme  and,  standing  near the apex of the Triangle, symbolises the primacy of parliament or the legislature over the other two components.

 

The building also occupies a prominent and strategic location at the southern end of the main Land Axis of Griffin’s city design, and contributes to the planned aesthetic qualities of the Parliamentary Triangle. The axis is arguably the pivotal feature of the design. Old Parliament House is one of four buildings sited on the axis. The other buildings being the Australian War Memorial, Anzac Hall and the current Parliament House. Accordingly, the Old Parliament House makes a major contribution as a viewpoint towards the Australian War Memorial which, together with the reverse view, are some of the most important views in the planned city.

Its landmark status was recognised and enhanced by the design and siting of Australian Parliament House which integrated the building as part of the terminal feature of the North South vista along the Land Axis.

The success of the building in fulfilling this landmark role is due in part to its stark white colour and symmetry, its privileged siting on the Land Axis and the open

landscaping between the building and the lake. The role of the Old Parliament House


NATIONAL HERITAGE LISTED VALUES

COMMONWEALTH HERITAGE LISTED VALUES

Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

 

as a national icon is reinforced by its central location in the nation’s capital.

Criterion F: Creative or technical achievement

Old Parliament House is a significant landmark in Canberra. It is a major component of Walter Burley Griffin’s designed landscape of the Parliamentary Triangle which was designed to hold the principal components of parliamentary government. In particular, the Griffin design sought to demonstrate the strict separation of the legislative, executive and judicial components of government and the hierarchical relationship between them. Old Parliament House demonstrates a high degree of achievement in combining built features into a designed landscape to achieve an aesthetic purpose.

Erected at the base of the former Camp Hill on the main Land Axis, Old Parliament House symbolised the primacy of Parliament (or the legislature) over the executive arm of government. In this way the building contributed to the planned democracy symbolism of the Parliamentary Triangle now fulfilled with the construction of Parliament House on Capital Hill. This new Parliament House upholds Griffin’s design intention and embraces the Old Parliament House as an integral feature of the Land Axis vista.

The success of Old Parliament House as a landmark is also due in part to its modest scale and aesthetic qualities, and the open landscaping and gardens between the building and the lake. Intended as a provisional structure, Old Parliament House was deliberately designed as a simple yet dignified building possessing appropriate exterior aesthetic and formal qualities for its use and location.

It is a significant component of the designed vista along Canberra’s Land Axis. The Land Axis is one of Griffin’s main city design components which sets the order of the Federal Capital’s design.

Although manifesting building failures in the past, with a constantly leaking roof, Old Parliament House demonstrates a high degree of achievement in combining built features into the designed landscape to achieve an aesthetic purpose.

 

Old Parliament House also represents a significant creative achievement. Intended as a provisional structure but occupying such a prominent location, it was deliberately designed as a plain yet dignified structure so that it possessed appropriate aesthetic and formal qualities for its location, but not to such an extent that it would enhance the possibility of the building becoming a permanent fixture in the landscape.

Criterion G: Social value

Specific rooms and spaces within the building are  directly associated with events that shaped the political and private lives of prominent individuals in Australia’s political and social history. Many of the former parliamentarians’ support staff and media representatives retain strong associations with the building and its contents.

The importance of Old Parliament House to the Australian community was demonstrated when organisations and individuals rallied to support the retention of the place when it was threatened with demolition in the 1970s.

 

Old Parliament House has been a strong symbol of Commonwealth Government in Australia, and of Canberra itself, for many generations of Australians. While its original function has shifted to the current Parliament House, the earlier building remains an important and familiar feature because of the memories of its former role, its new roles in the public realm, and its major contribution to the most familiar views in Canberra, from and to the building along the Land Axis.

Elements of the building that particularly reflect this value are the front façade, the


NATIONAL HERITAGE LISTED VALUES

COMMONWEALTH HERITAGE LISTED VALUES

Attributes key: fabric shown in green; associations and uses shown in bold

 

entrance portico, King’s Hall and the Chambers. The façade of the building is significant as a widely recognised symbol of Commonwealth Parliament and Government from 1927 to 1988. The façade is also important as the backdrop for media interviews, protests and other events associated with the Parliament and Government. These events include the establishment of an Aboriginal Tent Embassy in nearby Parkes Place in January 1972 and the address by Prime Minister Whitlam on the front steps of the building after his sacking by the Governor- General, Sir John Kerr, in November 1975.

Criterion H: Significant people

 

As the home of the Commonwealth Parliament from 1927 until 1988, Old Parliament House is significant for its associations with Commonwealth Governments, Oppositions, political parties, individual politicians and the press. Specific rooms and spaces within the building are directly associated with events that shaped the political and private lives of prominent individuals in Australia’s political and social history. Many of the surviving parliamentarians, support staff and media representatives feel strong associations with the building and its contents.

Old Parliament House is also significant as the most prominent example of the work of the Commonwealth’s first government architect, John Smith Murdoch. To a lesser extent, it is significant as an example of the work of the Chief Architect of the Department of the Interior, Edwin Henderson, who devised the scheme for adding the southeast and southwest wings in their original two-storey form.

Old Parliament House has an important association with many people, particularly national politicians.

Prime Ministers of Australia who served their term in Old Parliament House include:

Stanley Bruce

from 29/10/1922 to 22/10/1929

James Scullin

from 22/10/1929 to 6/1/1932

Joseph Lyons

from 6/1/1932 to 7/4/1939

Earle Page

from 7/4/1939 to 26/4/1939

Robert Menzies

from 26/4/1939 to 29/8/1941

Arthur Fadden

from 29/8/1941 to 7/10/1941

John Curtin

from 7/10/1941 to 5/7/1945

Frank Forde

from 6/7/1945 to 13/7/1945

Ben Chifley

from 13/7/1945 to 19/12/1949

Robert Menzies

from 19/12/1949 to 26/1/1966

Harold Holt

from 26/1/1966 to 19/12/1967

John McEwen

from 19/12/1967 to 10/1/1968

John Gorton

from 10/1/1968 to 10/3/1971

William McMahon

from 10/3/1971 to 5/12/1972

Gough Whitlam

from 5/12/1972 to 11/11/1975

Malcolm Fraser

from 11/11/1975 to 11/3/1983

Bob Hawke

from 11/3/1983

and continued beyond 1988 when federal Parliament moved to the new building.

Prominent individuals associated with the Wings include Senator Neville Bonner AO, the first Aboriginal parliamentarian elected in 1972, and Dame Enid Lyons and Senator Dorothy Tangney, the first women elected in 1943.

The building is the most prominent example of the work of the Commonwealth’s first government architect, John Smith Murdoch.

3.4.  Values management tool: mapped values

To facilitate heritage management at Old Parliament House, the locations of the listed values have been mapped across the building’s floorplans. The maps illustrate where the values are located and where they overlap.


The initial values-mapping process was undertaken for the first version of this Heritage Management Plan and involved an analysis of how the identified heritage values are embodied in different aspects of the place, its setting and its fabric. In 2016 an independent heritage assessment was undertaken on the basement areas. It determined that while the basement areas do not meet the significance threshold for National Heritage value in their own right, they are significant against a number of the Commonwealth Heritage criteria. As such, the basements were assessed against the Commonwealth criteria, and the location of the associated values is indicated on the following floorplans. The floorplans now include upper, main, lower and basement levels.

 

In addition to mapping locations for the values, the mapping process also illustrates how robustly the identified values are embodied in the place and the fabric. This concept has been termed the ‘sensitivity of the values to change’.5

 

3.4.1.  Sensitivity of the values to change

The term ‘sensitivity of the values to change’ refers to the degree to which the heritage values can sustain changes to uses without any adverse impact.

 

Areas with a high sensitivity to change are those where even a small degree of change has the potential to affect the heritage values. These areas are likely to be ones with a high level of intact fabric which demonstrates, for example, a range of technical and creative values and historical associations. On the other hand, areas with a low sensitivity to change are those where the values can tolerate a higher level of change without suffering detrimental effects. These may be areas where the values are not so strongly embodied in the extant fabric. The mapped values are illustrated on the following pages.

 

The values-mapping process informed the development of the zones, which are set out in Chapter 6.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

5      See Glossary (Appendix J) for a definition of high and low sensitivity to change.


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 

 



 


3.5.  Condition and integrity of the heritage values

In July 2020 an assessment of the condition of the heritage values for Old Parliament House was undertaken by an external party. Two different types of analysis were used to assess the condition and integrity of heritage values: a significant heritage fabric assessment and an assessment of the Commonwealth and National Heritage values themselves.

 

This assessment concluded that, overall, the fabric of Old Parliament House is in good condition with high integrity. There are a number of values – elements or spaces within the building – where the condition has improved since 2013, owing to dedicated conservation projects and routine maintenance. However, overarching statements that make an aggregate assessment of the whole building can mask the fact that particular items require immediate attention.

 

The detailed findings of the assessment, an explanation of the methodology used and a comparison with the findings of the 2007 and 2013 assessments can be found at Appendix H.


PART B: MANAGEMENT FRAMEWORK

This section of the plan outlines the Old Parliament House management framework.

 

·         Chapter 4: Statutory Management Frameworks outlines the legislative framework within which decisions about the management of the place are made.

·         Chapter 5: The Current Use of the Place summarises the management structure, strategic vision and current strategic plan for the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House

·         Chapter 6: Risk Management summarises the key pressures to the listed values and the management opportunities.

·         Chapter 7: The Policies sets out the policies to conserve and protect the identified heritage values.

·         Chapter 8: The Zones introduces a management tool derived from the mapping of the heritage values. Zones organise the place so that areas with like managerial requirements and objectives can be effectively managed.

·         Chapter 9: Use Plan illustrates the current use of the place and provides an indication of possible future uses.

·         Chapter 10: Monitoring and Review describes how the implementation of this management plan will monitored and reviewed.


4.  Statutory Management Frameworks

4.1.  Background

The management framework for Old Parliament House and Curtilage is entirely exercised by the Commonwealth, with two parties administering the area: the National Capital Authority (NCA) and Old Parliament House as a Statutory Agency.

 

The place sits in a broader Commonwealth Heritage listed area known as the Parliament House Vista, comprising some 260 hectares administered by the NCA, and is adjacent to other important places, buildings and landscapes.

 

The place must be managed as a feature in the broader landscape, as well as an individual element with its own heritage values. The key relationships are determined by the place’s symbolic location in the landscape, together with the social and historic functions performed there over time that have a broader community appeal across Australia and internationally.

 

The role of management is to continue to express and maintain the heritage values of the place by ameliorating risks and maintaining the attributes of the place in its setting; and to interpret and communicate the values to the broader Australian community so that the place continues to be alive and meaningful to the existence of the nation.

 

Management of the heritage values of Old Parliament House is undertaken within a statutory planning framework. There are four key pieces of Australian legislation that apply to the management of the place’s heritage values:

 

·         Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

·         Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988

·         National Capital Plan 1990

·         Parliament Act 1974.

The management and protection of the heritage values is integrated into the vision and strategic objectives for the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House.

 

4.2.  Statutory Listings

4.2.1.  Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

The principal legislation governing the management of Old Parliament House is the EPBC Act. Under this Act Old Parliament House is responsible for ensuring the protection of the National and Commonwealth Heritage listed values pursuant to the Act. The key objectives of the Act relevant to Old Parliament House are to:

 

·         provide for the protection of the environment, especially those aspects of the environment that are matters of national environmental significance

·         provide for the protection and conservation of heritage

·         promote a cooperative approach to the protection and management of the environment involving governments, the community, landholders and indigenous peoples.

The EPBC Act also identifies and defines the principle of ecologically sustainable development that should underpin management decision-making and defines key heritage management principles.

 

In association with the EPBC Act, the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000 (Regulations) inform the practice of meeting the Act’s requirements. Relevant sections are: Schedules


5A and 5B for National Heritage listed places and Schedules 7A and 7B for Commonwealth Heritage listed places (see Appendix A).

 

This plan sets in place a formal administrative process for the assessment and approval of actions for the day-to-day activities of Old Parliament House. Matters that require approval under the EPBC Act are to be referred to the Commonwealth agency responsible for administering it.

 

4.2.2.  Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988

The Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988 establishes the National Capital Authority (NCA) and requires it to prepare and administer a ‘National Capital Plan’.

 

4.2.3.  National Capital Plan 1990

The key statutory planning document influencing the management of Old Parliament House and Curtilage is the National Capital Plan, administered by the National Capital Authority.

 

The object of the National Capital Plan is to ensure that Canberra and the Australian Capital Territory are planned and developed in accordance with their national significance. In particular, the plan seeks to preserve and enhance the special characteristics and those qualities of the National Capital which are of national significance. Areas of national significance are identified as ‘Designated Areas’, which include both ‘National Land’ (managed by the Commonwealth) and ‘Territory Land’ (managed by the ACT Government).

 

The plan describes the broad pattern of land use to be adopted in the development of Canberra and other relevant matters of broad policy. The plan also sets out detailed conditions for the planning, design and development of National Land.

 

Works within a Designated Area require written approval from the National Capital Authority and must meet these detailed conditions. Such works include:

 

·         new buildings or structures

·         relocation of or installation of new sculptures

·         landscaping

·         excavation

·         tree-felling

·         demolition.

Old Parliament House and Curtilage is part of the Parliamentary Zone, a Designated Area as defined in the National Capital Plan. Therefore all external ‘works’ require written approval from the National Capital Authority.

 

4.2.4.  Parliament Act 1974

Works proposed in the Parliamentary Zone require approval of both Houses of federal Parliament. The Joint Standing Committee on the National Capital and External Territories may inquire into development proposals within the Parliamentary Zone and make recommendations for their approval. Specified works require approval from Parliament. In general, these provisions apply to external works, and matters of minor impact, including maintenance and repair which may be reported to the Joint Standing Committee.

 

4.2.5.  Other codes and guidelines

The management of Old Parliament House is guided by a number of national and internationally recognised conservation guidelines, standards and codes of practice. Foundational to all conservation and heritage management decision-making is the The Burra Charter: Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance, 2013 (see Appendix E).


Other government legislation relating to finance, native title, administration, security, work health safety, safety in design, disability access and building regulations influence and direct activities of management.


5.  The Current Use of the Place

5.1.  Background

Since 2009 Old Parliament House has been home to the Museum of Australian Democracy (MoAD). Old Parliament House is also known as the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House.

 

5.2.  Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House management structure

In 2016 the Public Governance, Performance and Accountability (Establishing Old Parliament House) Rule 2016 established Old Parliament House as a corporate Commonwealth entity, legally separate from the Commonwealth. This Rule prescribes the functions and powers of Old Parliament House, and its management structure, including the functions and powers of the Old Parliament House Board and the role of the Director. The functions of the Board are to decide the objectives, strategies and policies to be followed by Old Parliament House, and to ensure the proper and efficient performance of its functions. The Board is the accountable authority.

 

Old Parliament House is a statutory agency of the Australian Government. It is composed of six functional areas: People, Strategy and Museum Experience; Exhibitions, Research and Learning; Heritage, Communications and Development; Facilities and Capital Projects; Digital and Information Technology (IT); and Finance.

 

5.3.  MoAD Strategic Plan 2018–2023

5.3.1.  MoAD vision

The MoAD vision is expressed thus: Celebrating the stories and spirit of Australian democracy and the power of our voices within it.

 

Democracy the world over is under pressure. Trust in public institutions – government, business, media and non-government organisations – is at an historic low.6 MoAD plays a significant role in enriching understanding and appreciation of Australia’s political legacy and the intrinsic value of democracy – the capacity for people to have a say in the future of this nation.

 

Through our exhibitions, events, engagement and education programs we will cultivate ‘a peoples’ place’ – true to the building’s original brief – to improve understanding of democracy and the skills required to participate in it.

 

In a country comprising people from over 200 nations, MoAD provides a space where the varied voices that make up our nation can be heard and respected. As a trusted cultural institution, MoAD seeks to build new, mutually beneficial partnerships that will extend our reach, engagement and influence to a range of audiences.

 

In five years’ time this iconic building and all it represents will be a place where all of society engages with big ideas. To do this our exhibitions, outreach, visitor experiences, partnerships and events, will be richly informed by original and authoritative research. We seek to educate through entertainment and engagement, reflecting on and reinforcing Australia’s place as a leading democratic nation.

 

5.3.2.  MoAD activities and strategic priorities

The MoAD Strategic Plan 2018–2023 is a five-year plan intended to implement the agency’s vision. It aims to be:

 


 

6      Edelman Trust Barometer 2018


·         Bold

Shaping conversations, influencing outcomes.

 

Our exhibitions, events, collections and education programs will provoke thoughtful engagement through stories and creative interpretations of past and current events informed by authoritative research and data analysis. We will advance national conversations about democracy – past, present and future.

 

·         Relevant

Empowering and engaging communities.

 

We promote active citizenship via a suite of transformative audience experiences and targeted activities that are timely and influential, and which support inclusion and build civic and social cohesion.

 

·         Authentic

Celebrating a spirit of place.

 

In this nationally significant building, we will create a vibrant and contemporary hub that empowers civic and individual engagement in the democratic process. Progress will be achieved in harmony with heritage values that recognise, preserve and communicate the spirit of place.

 

·         Dynamic

Creating a sustainable and thriving future.

 

Our organisational culture will enable MoAD and its valued staff to be nimble, collaborative and efficient. Our actions and relationships will ensure ongoing relevance and financial sustainability.7

 

5.4.  Contemporary community stakeholders

Old Parliament House is one of a number of heritage-listed properties in the region and one of many important buildings in the local environment. There are a number of organisations and partnerships that work together to foster an appreciation of, and improved management outcomes for, cultural heritage in the region. Old Parliament House maintains an active role in these organisations, in order to pursue continuous improvement in the management of heritage properties and to enhance the capacity and skills of people involved in the management of heritage places within the region.

 

The Old Parliament House management acknowledges that the community, and particularly the volunteers and associates of the place, contribute significantly to its living history and help keep it alive. In 2020 Old Parliament House has over 90 active volunteers. In 2018 a new youth volunteer program was launched to complement the existing volunteer guide program. The youth program targets those aged 18–25 years and provides volunteers with opportunities to support special events and to engage with visitors in exhibitions. Volunteers and associates are crucial to the informed interpretation and management of the place.

 

Old Parliament House continues to strengthen its ties with existing associates and to foster relationships with new audiences. Community connections inform the interpretation and management of the place.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

7      Section 5.3 reproduces material in the MoAD Strategic Framework 2018–23

(available at moadoph.gov.au: Corporate Documents).


6.  Risk Management

6.1.  Background

Risk management is integral to the management of the National and Commonwealth Heritage values of Old Parliament House and is embedded in the policies and tools of this Heritage Management Plan. Risk management is an ongoing activity undertaken by staff to ensure that judicious decisions are made to manage the place’s heritage values.

 

A risk management approach is used to effectively manage changes to the place. Change is an essential activity that ensures Old Parliament House remains relevant and vital; it can present both risks and opportunities to the heritage values. Change is often necessary to ensure legislative compliance.

Compliance with legislation that protects the heritage values must be balanced with the Building Code of Australia, the Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (Cwlth), the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (Cwlth) and other Australian standards. Catering to the diverse needs of the various users of the place – including visitors, staff and tenants – may also prompt change activities.

 

The tools used to manage change at Old Parliament House include the Action Proposal Process (Chapter 11), the Permitted Action Schedule (Chapter 12), and the Old Parliament House management strategies (Chapter 13).

 

The Action Proposal Process is the key mechanism for considering new actions in and on the place. It includes a method for identifying, analysing and treating risks to the heritage values. Risk management enables staff to manage change effectively, so that progress at the place is achieved in harmony with the heritage values.

 

6.2.  Summary of identified pressures on the listed values

The risks to the identified values at Old Parliament House generally fall into two categories:

 

·         risks to the fabric and form of the place

·         risks to the less tangible values of the place.

The effects of this first category of risks tend to be measurable. They also tend to be the risks that are more readily identifiable in advance and therefore can be prevented. These risks include:

 

·         fire, flood, theft, vandalism, natural disaster, terrorist attack etc

·         inappropriate conservation work resulting in damage to heritage fabric

·         inappropriate physical intervention (such as demolition or unsympathetic addition) of parts of Old Parliament House

·         inappropriate use and/or inappropriate maintenance resulting in damage to heritage fabric

·         the slow erosion of values through incremental change such as physical deterioration owing to aging, culminating in major impacts on the place

·         declining budgets and resources resulting in reduced and/or inadequate maintenance and monitoring.

The second category of risks relates principally to the less tangible values of Old Parliament House, and the need to ensure its ongoing use by, and the interpretation of its values for, a wide audience. These risks include:

 

·         a change of use to all or part of the place, or the carrying out of inappropriate activities

(including inappropriate promotions) that results in a diminution of the symbolic values of Old Parliament House or a reduction in public access


·         the failure to appropriately tell the stories of the place through ill-informed or ineffective interpretation

·         the disengagement of important stakeholders (such as government and the public) from Old Parliament House as a result of failing to effectively communicate the place’s heritage values or through inadequate consultation

·         the reduction of Old Parliament House to a sterile and uninteresting environment rather than an active, relevant and engaging heritage place

·         a privileging of some phases of the place’s history over others as a result of a failure to appreciate its multi-layered heritage values

·         a loss of important relationships between spaces, objects and people as a result of a failure to properly appreciate the significant associations at Old Parliament House.

6.3.  Summary of identified opportunities for the protection of the heritage values

The risks to the heritage values of Old Parliament House are generally manageable through proper planning. All potential risks to Old Parliament House are effectively managed through the Action Proposal Process (Chapter 11).

 

Risks to the heritage values can be minimised through promoting the place in the mind of the public. In particular, harnessing of its symbolic status, and telling the story of Australian democracy and the place’s history in an engaging and exciting manner, will help minimise risks to some of the less tangible values of Old Parliament House. Opportunities for promotion and interpretation should be taken up and carried out in partnership with other bodies, as appropriate. They need to be supported by an ongoing research program, which will also ensure that important associations between spaces, things and people are not lost.

 

Changes in use (including new tenants, functions, events and other activities) can also provide opportunities to enhance the heritage values of Old Parliament House and provide opportunities for its improved ongoing community use, conservation and interpretation.

 

6.4.  The management response

The outcomes of the risk analysis are manifested in the Heritage Management Plan at a number of levels. They have informed the design of the zones, statements of intent and the objectives devised to manage the heritage values within them. Similarly, they have informed the many policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan, as well as other agency management documents for collections, learning, disasters etc. Together, the objectives and policies (and the action framework developed to give them effect) proactively address the identified threats to Old Parliament House’s heritage values. They establish an assessment procedure for all actions and provide clear direction in relation to conservation, consultation, interpretation, monitoring of works, training and general management. They also respond to the identified opportunities for improved heritage management by identifying steps that might be taken to more effectively tell the stories of the place while making appropriate use of its internal spaces and movable heritage without any adverse impact on heritage values.


7.  Policies

7.1.  Background

The policies are derived from a consideration of:

 

·         the heritage values of Old Parliament House

·         the identified risks to those values

·         the uses, constraints and opportunities affecting the place.

The policies form a framework for the management of the heritage values of Old Parliament House in their sociocultural, commercial and environmental context. (See Appendix G for the rationales and commentaries supporting the policies.)

 

The policies inform the zones and their statements of intent and objectives (see Zones, Chapter 8).

The zones enact the intent of the policy framework in relation to the conservation and management of the different areas of the building which embody the diverse aspects of the heritage values.

 

The specific tasks associated with these policies are described in the Implementation Plan (see Chapter 14).

 

7.2.  The Policies

There are eight key policy areas:

 

1.        Conservation

This policy provides the framework for the physical conservation of the heritage values of Old Parliament House. It outlines the framework for undertaking conservation work, conservation management activities and ongoing research.

 

2.        Management approach

This policy provides the framework for assessing and making robust decisions about Action Proposals.

 

3.        Documentation and monitoring

This policy provides for the recording of change at Old Parliament House and for monitoring and evaluating the performance of the policies.

 

4.        Communication and interpretation

This policy provides for consultation with community and stakeholders and for the interpretation and promotion of the heritage values of the place.

 

5.        Existing and future uses

This policy provides the framework for the continuation or cessation of existing uses and for the facilitation of new uses.

 

6.        Access, security, plant and services

This policy provides for the conservation of the heritage values of Old Parliament House in the context of facilitating access, security requirements, plant and services.

 

7.        Acquisitions, disposals and leasing

This policy provides direction for accessioning, deaccessioning, leasing and other forms of disposal or acquisition of parts of Old Parliament House, including movable heritage.


8.        Environmental management

This policy provides for the coordination of heritage management and sound environmental management.

 

1.   Conservation

 

Old Parliament House management must conserve the heritage values of the place in accordance with the EPBC Act and the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988. Old Parliament House management recognise and adopt the official heritage values and statements of significance as a basis for management of the place through applying the Burra Charter, employing competent heritage managers and advisers, undertaking appropriate research and assessment prior to making decisions which may impact upon heritage values and seeking funds to manage the place based upon the goal of a nil decline in the condition of heritage values.

 

CONSERVATION APPROACH

1.1 Principal

management documents

1.1.1           The heritage values of Old Parliament House must be conserved and managed in accordance with the Heritage Management Plan and the Burra Charter.

1.1.2           Old Parliament House management must review and update the Heritage Management Plan every five years, or as necessary, and annually report on its implementation as specified in the EPBC Regulations 5A (10.01C) and 7A (10.01E).

1.2 Conservation processes

1.2.1    Conservation, maintenance, preservation, restoration, reconstruction and adaptation works (as defined by the Burra Charter) must be carried out in accordance with the Burra Charter. The respective need for conservation, preservation, restoration, reconstruction and adaptation must be determined by reference to Old Parliament House’s heritage values and their sensitivity to change.

1.3 Specific elements of the conservation processes

1.3.1           Conserve, protect and maintain all heritage fabric (attributes of the values) of the building pertaining to the functions and occupation of Parliament including:

·   the existing external and internal fabric, spaces, objects and servicing

·   the Inter-war Stripped Classical architectural style, symmetrical style, form, massing and details of the building in its open vista setting

·   all rooms of design, architectural and functional interest and their juxtapositions.

1.4 Retention of fabric in situ

1.4.1           Heritage building fabric (pre-1988) must be retained in situ commensurate with its heritage values and sensitivity to change, unless precluded by legislative requirements, health and safety considerations, threat of vandalism or theft, and/or severely deteriorated condition.

1.4.2           Any proposal to remove fabric to protect it from threats of deterioration, theft or vandalism will be an action which must be assessed.

1.4.3           A representative sample of in situ fabric must be retained where feasible.

1.4.4           Traditional techniques and materials for the conservation of fabric of heritage value must be preferred, except where modern techniques and materials offer substantial conservation benefits (Burra Charter, Article 4).

1.5 Removing

heritage fabric

1.5.1           Where fabric of heritage value is removed as a result of an action, which has been assessed following the procedures contained in the Heritage Management Plan, this must be preceded by, and carried out with, appropriate documentation and monitoring.

1.5.2           All removed fabric must be assessed and protected in accordance with its heritage values.

1.5.3           All removed fabric which is assessed as possessing heritage value must be stored on site, as far as possible (Burra Charter, Article 33).


CONSERVATION APPROACH

 

1.5.4           In situ evidence of removed fabric of heritage value must be retained where this is consistent with the heritage values of the place.

1.5.5           New/replacement fabric must be labelled and discernible as such on close inspection.

1.6 Intrusive fabric

1.6.1           Intrusive fabric must be removed where to do so does not cause greater adverse impact on heritage values than its retention (for example through damage to heritage fabric) unless one or more of the following applies:

·   it plays an essential role in the operation or management of the place

·   its retention is necessary to maintain operational or safety standards.

1.6.2           Intrusive fabric is fabric which detracts from, or diminishes, the heritage values of the place. For example, post-1988 fabric.

1.7 Protection of the setting

1.7.1           The setting will be protected by:

·   maintaining the relationship with the adjacent House of Representative Gardens and Senate Gardens

·   ensuring the Parliament House Vista is unimpeded by works on Old Parliament House

·   ensuring no additions or extensions are made to the external boundaries (elevations and roof) of the building and its curtilage

·   conserving and protecting views to and from Old Parliament House.

1.8 Conserving the layered history of Old Parliament House

1.8.1           Wherever possible the conservation of one ‘layer’ of the Old Parliament House story should not compromise the conservation and interpretation of other ‘layers’. Maintenance or capital work must be undertaken in accordance with the identified heritage values of the layers.

1.8.2           Where maintenance or capital work or physical intervention in the building has the potential to expose earlier, hidden layers of fabric, this work will be assessed using the procedures in this Heritage Management Plan.

1.8.3           Such actions may be approved with appropriate conditions which ensure that:

·   the work is undertaken by an appropriate person

·   the heritage value of the newly revealed fabric is assessed and is subsequently managed in line with this Heritage Management Plan and Old Parliament House Management Strategies.

 

 

TREATMENT APPROACH

1.9 Treatment of specific components of the building fabric

1.9.1           All treatment of components must be carried out in accordance with the corresponding Permitted Action Schedule or by seeking approval of the approach via an Action Proposal Form (see Chapter 11). Prior to any treatment of specific components of the building fabric, the relevant Old Parliament House management strategy must be referred to for detailed guidance.

1.9.2           A cleaning program must be implemented in accordance with the Permitted Action Schedule.

1.9.3           The treatment of specific components of the building should be carried out as outlined below. This is not an exhaustive list of treatments, but rather a specific list of key components.

·   The roof line must remain below the height of the parapet line. The roof cladding and structure should be repaired where feasible, or modified and replaced as necessary.


TREATMENT APPROACH

 

·   Where feasible, pre-1988 floor fabric should be conserved, with appropriate finishes. Sample areas of rubber flooring should be retained in use and on display where their ongoing conservation can be achieved. Where rubber or parquet floor materials are unserviceable, and it is intended to lay new and different floor coverings (for example, carpet in place of rubber), consideration should be given to methods of laying new floor coverings on top of old which might maximise the conservation of the earlier flooring. Every effort should be made to conserve in situ at least a sample of original flooring treatments, if more extensive conservation is not feasible. If flooring has been assessed by the Actions Committee for removal owing to its poor condition, then a replica must be considered the most appropriate alternative (see also Policies 1.4.1 and 1.5.5). Floor management should be consistent with the

Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy. Refer to the strategy and associated policies for direction.

·   Ceilings in spaces with high individual heritage value should be retained at their existing height or reconstructed to the height that reflects their significance. In other areas, existing lowered ceiling heights may be retained if these are needed to conceal mechanical or electrical services.

 

·   Evidence of former colour schemes should be researched and documented to the highest standard of heritage practice.

·   The colour schemes applied to the exterior or interior spaces of heritage value in Old Parliament House should be based on a documented former scheme.

·   Painting of interior spaces in sympathetic but non-historical new colours is an acceptable component of adaptation to new uses where the level of sensitivity to change allows, and where the interpretation of the building is not a primary function of the space.

·   Frequent painting of pre-1988 surfaces for exhibition purposes should be discouraged, or other techniques used, to retain pre-1988 architectural textures. Exhibition messages should not be painted on pre-1988 walls.

·   Skylights should be maintained to allow natural light to enter the building. Refer also to Old Parliament House Light Management Strategy skylight policies.

·   The external fabric of the building should be stabilised using the most effective conservation techniques.

 

 

MOVABLE HERITAGE (COLLECTIONS)

1.10 Conservation and management of movable heritage and collections

1.10.1        The collection development plan and collection management procedures must refer to these policies and be the principal guides for the management of the agency’s collection.

1.10.2        Collection management must be guided by the AICCM Code of Practice, the ICOM Code of Ethics for Museums, the Museums Australia Code of Ethics, the Resource Description and Access, the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH), the Australian extension to LCSH, Dewey Decimal Classification, MARC21 and other Libraries Australia cataloguing standards.

1.10.3        Development of the museum collection through acquisitions must contribute to:

·   bringing alive the significance of democracy to the lives of Australians

·   conserving and interpreting the values of the building and its collection

·   providing relevant learning and public programs.


MOVABLE HERITAGE (COLLECTIONS)

 

1.10.4        Acquisitions to the collection must consider the significance and requirements to care for the item.

1.10.5        Acquisitions must be recommended to the delegate by the Acquisitions Committee before becoming part of the museum collection (excluding library material).

1.10.6        Old Parliament House will not collect conditional donations, ‘permanent loans’, items with inadequate provenance, items that cannot be appropriately cared for or items transferred in contravention of any Australian law.

1.10.7        The collection will be documented to international standards.

1.10.8        All items accepted into the collection must have clear transfer of ownership documentation.

1.10.9        All inward and outward loans will be documented.

1.10.10     Old Parliament House will in the first instance use its collection for display, augmenting programs with borrowed items.

1.10.11     Loans will only be made on a short-term basis.

1.10.12     Access and use of collection items will be balanced against their conservation, care and security requirements.

1.10.13     Staff, volunteers and contractors will be trained in working around collections.

1.10.14     Old Parliament House will provide appropriate levels of care, storage conditions and display conditions for its collection and loaned items, including ensuring appropriate environment, physical conditions, handling and security.

1.10.15     Old Parliament House will store its collection on-site whenever possible.

1.10.16     Old Parliament House will regularly monitor items on display and make changes as necessary to protect the condition of the items.

1.11 Use of original items of movable heritage

1.11.1        The use of original items of movable heritage in display, interpretation, exhibition etc may be considered where adequate safeguards for their physical security can be provided.

1.11.2        The use of original timber and leather upholstered items of furniture in general office operations must be encouraged unless one or more of the following conditions obtains:

·   items are part of the Reference Collection

·   the continued use would have an adverse impact on the heritage values of the items or place

·   doing so is precluded by health and safety considerations.

1.11.3        Public use of the Chambers furniture is restricted to situations in which:

·   ideally, a staff member or volunteer is present

·   the benches have permanent protective leather covers (NB members of the public cannot sit on the Speaker’s, Vice-Regal, Consort’s and President’s chairs).

1.11.4        Replicas may be used for interpretive purposes where original furniture, fittings etc do not exist or where the intended interpretive use would jeopardise the conservation of original pieces.

Replicas must be so labelled, and discernible as such, on close inspection.

 

 

QUALIFICATIONS AND EXPERTISE

1.12 Heritage expertise

1.12.1        Old Parliament House must maintain a staff solely responsible for heritage and collection management.

1.12.2        Only appropriately competent people may:

·   provide advice to Old Parliament House personnel with respect to the carrying out of heritage conservation works

·   determine the appropriateness of actions in heritage terms


 

·   certify heritage assessments or assess actions

·   supervise or carry out conservation work.

1.12.3        Senior Heritage staff must be able to demonstrate competence and experience in heritage matters.

1.12.4        Competent direction and supervision must be maintained at all stages, and any changes should be implemented by people with appropriate knowledge and skills (Burra Charter, Article 30).

1.12.5        Relevant Old Parliament House staff must have access to periodic in- service training that is conservation-focused.

1.12.6        All staff and tenants must attend heritage-awareness training on induction.

1.12.7        Where requisite in-house skills or knowledge are not available, external consultants must be engaged to provide the skills or knowledge.

1.12.8        Old Parliament House may maintain an Expert Advisory Panel in order to provide expert advice, peer review and support to Old Parliament House staff.

1.12.9        Old Parliament House may seek advice from the Commonwealth agency administering the EPBC Act.

1.13 Training

1.13.1 Old Parliament House management must pursue an active and ongoing training program for all new and existing staff, and contractors where relevant, which reflects the content and intent of the Heritage Management Plan and which is responsive to the changing needs of the place and new technologies.

 

 

RESEARCH

1.14 Research

1.14.1        Old Parliament House must prepare a schedule of priority research areas to encourage research activity into areas that will assist in the management of heritage values.

1.14.2        Old Parliament House must complete and maintain research and documentation for both the building – room by room/area by area – and the movable collection.

1.14.3        Old Parliament House may facilitate research through partnerships with tertiary institutions.

1.14.4        Old Parliament House must store research data in a sustainable and permanent form and make it publicly available, subject to the requirements of security and privacy, where this is culturally appropriate.

1.14.5        Old Parliament House must maintain its Reference Collection of highly significant items of movable heritage and examples of common movable items in good condition, for research and conservation purposes.

1.14.6        Old Parliament House will make its collection available for research where that research builds upon the current knowledge of the item or collection.

1.15 Managing

research impacts

1.15.1        ‘Disturbance of significant fabric for study, or to obtain evidence, should be minimised. Study of a place by any disturbance of the fabric, including archaeological excavation, should only be undertaken to provide data essential for decisions on the conservation of the place, or to obtain important evidence about to be lost or made inaccessible’ (Burra Charter, Article 28).

1.15.2        Research in Old Parliament House must be considered an action requiring the assessment of an Action Proposal Form, unless specifically permitted in the Permitted Action Schedule.

 

 

ARCHAEOLOGY AND FLORA


1.16 Potential

archaeology

1.16.1        Ground disturbance work must be preceded by an archaeological assessment and, where archaeological potential is identified, carried out in accordance with the assessment’s recommendations for archaeological heritage management.

1.16.2        Archaeological assessments must be undertaken by a professional archaeologist.

1.16.3        A professional archaeologist shall supervise any ground disturbance in areas identified as being archaeologically sensitive.

1.17 Flora species

1.17.1        Old Parliament House management must liaise with the National Capital Authority to develop and implement a plan to protect and propagate flora species of heritage value in order to maintain the heritage values of the gardens and plantings at Old Parliament House.

1.17.2        Old Parliament House management must prepare a program for the maintenance of the gardens in the curtilage area.

 

2.   Management approach

 

Old Parliament House management must maintain a cross-organisational committee to ensure the protection of heritage values through robust participatory management, decision-making procedures and the assessment of Action Proposals, and manage tenders and contracts through appropriate application of the EPBC Act and other relevant legislation and codes.

 

MANAGEMENT MECHANISMS

2.1 Actions

Committee

2.1.1           Old Parliament House management must maintain a committee to make recommendations about Action Proposals made up of at least the managers responsible for the following functional areas:

·   building services and capital works

·   heritage conservation and collection management

·   events, learning and public programs

·   exhibitions and interpretation.

2.1.2           A log of recommendations made by the committee and decisions made by the delegate must be kept. All committee deliberations and recommendations must be minuted.

2.1.3           The committee will meet regularly to:

·   oversee the routine maintenance program and the carrying out of a cyclical maintenance program

·   oversee the program for capital works, maintenance and repairs, informed by heritage considerations and the risk-based resource allocation program

·   resolve conflict arising from Action Proposals and Permitted Action Schedules

·   assess all Action Proposals, including events, exhibitions and interpretation, proposed maintenance and repair, against heritage values, and make recommendations as to the viability and appropriateness in heritage terms of proposed actions

·   consider and review reports and programs.

2.1.4           Delegations for approvals will be made in accordance with the Actions Committee Terms of Reference.

2.2 Assessment of proposals

2.2.1           Unless they are permitted actions, all proposals for works, conservation and other activities are actions requiring assessment and approval.

2.2.2           All proposals, including those for new uses, must include an assessment of the heritage values sensitivity to change as outlined in the Action Proposal Form and Mapped Values.

2.2.3           Actions must be assessed and certified following the procedures established in the Action Proposal Form unless specified in the Permitted Action Schedule.


MANAGEMENT MECHANISMS

 

2.2.4    Action Proposal Forms must be certified by a competent person and approved by a delegated officer.

2.3

Permitted actions

2.3.1           Permitted actions are actions that will not have an adverse impact on the heritage values. These must be undertaken in accordance with the scheduled guidelines without the need for an Action Proposal

(see Chapter 12 for Permitted Action Schedule).

2.3.2           Actions may be added to Permitted Action Schedule if they are determined by the Actions Committee to have no adverse impact on the heritage values.

2.3.3           Policies developed for Old Parliament House Management Strategies may be added to the Permitted Actions Schedule if they are determined by the Actions Committee to have no adverse impact on the heritage values.

2.4

Management Strategies

2.4.1    Old Parliament House Management Strategies provide detailed management guidance that is subsidiary to the Heritage Management Plan. Where relevant, management strategies should guide Action Proposals.

2.5

Zones

2.5.1    Policies must be enacted through the implementation of zones.

2.6

Works programs

2.6.1    Old Parliament House management must maintain a Capital Works Plan, a Routine Maintenance Program and a Cyclical Maintenance Program, based on the Life Cycle Cost Plan, consistent with this Heritage Management Plan.

 

 

CONTRACTS AND TENDERS

2.7 Conservation safeguards in contracts and tenders

2.7.1           Ensure the work methods are consistent with the conservation of the heritage values of Old Parliament House. In general, contracts must ensure that:

·   contractors are appropriately trained and supervised for work in a heritage building

 

·   contractors are appropriately attired during works (for example, white gloves or soft-soled shoes in some circumstances)

 

·   proposed work methodologies are reviewed by the Actions Committee prior to the commencement of the works

 

·   Old Parliament House management has access to the workplace in order to supervise, monitor and direct the works, as necessary

 

·   A risk assessment is undertaken and proof of heritage induction training is provided prior to the commencement of the works

 

·   Old Parliament House management can terminate the contract on reasonable grounds, including failure to observe acceptable standards of conservation work.

 

 

ALLOCATING RESOURCES

2.8   Resource

allocation

2.8.1    A risk-based resource-allocation process must be used to prioritise conservation works programs.

2.9 Cost to conserve

2.9.1    Old Parliament House management must adopt the approach of nil decline in the condition of the listed heritage values, and in the heritage management infrastructure necessary to conserve and maintain these values, in accessing and seeking the funding required to maintain the heritage values.


BUILDING STANDARDS

2.10 Building Code of Australia and Disability Discrimination Act

2.10.1        Old Parliament House management must adopt the Building Code of Australia (BCA) as a certification standard for building works, unless it conflicts with the heritage values.

2.10.2        Where change is required to achieve compliance with the BCA and/or the Disability Discrimination Act 1992 (DDA), confine those changes, as much as possible, to areas with a low sensitivity to change.

2.10.3        Where compliance with the BCA or DDA would cause a significant adverse impact on the heritage values, Old Parliament House management must liaise with the certifier/consent authority to achieve an outcome for the conservation of the heritage values of Old Parliament House which adequately satisfies the objectives of the certification standard without unduly compromising the heritage values.

 

 

BUSINESS

2.11 Business

continuity

2.11.1 Old Parliament House management must maintain and update the Old Parliament House Business Continuity Plan to be consistent with the Heritage Management Plan. The Business Continuity Plan must describe and direct the actions to be followed by the Business Continuity Teams in the event of an incident in order to maintain or restore regular operations as soon as possible.

2.12 Disaster

preparedness planning

2.12.1        Old Parliament House management must maintain its Disaster Management Plan through:

·   regular updating

·   ensuring training and exercises are completed on schedule

·   regular auditing of equipment and consumables for compliance

·   reporting to the Executive Management Group on preparedness.

2.12.2        The Building and Collection Disaster Management Plan must address:

·   disaster preparedness and planning

·   disaster response and recovery.

2.12.3        The Building and Collection Disaster Management Plan must be consistent with the Business Continuity Plan (see Policy 2.11.1). The Building and Collection Disaster Management Plan may be enacted by staff as part of the business continuity response.


3.   Documentation and monitoring

 

Old Parliament House management must establish and maintain systems for monitoring, evaluating, documenting and reporting on the management of the condition of the place and its heritage values, and maintain an effective response system to address any identified decline in condition.

 

DOCUMENTATION

3.1 Use of the

processes and documentation contained in the Heritage Management Plan

3.1.1           Old Parliament House management must maintain a database of Action Proposals and decisions made.

3.1.2           Old Parliament House management must record all works documentation in a suitable database as part of the works program.

3.1.3           Through the Human Impact Management Program, Old Parliament House management must maintain chronological records of events, functions and conferences identifying and documenting impacts where they occur.

 

 

MONITORING

3.2 Evaluation

strategy

3.2.1    Old Parliament House management must monitor all actions that are carried out at the place to ensure that they are effective and consistent with the heritage values, as part of an ongoing program.

3.3 Condition of values

3.3.1           The condition of Old Parliament House and its heritage values must be monitored as part of an ongoing condition assessment program.

3.3.2           Old Parliament House management must re-evaluate the condition of the heritage values at five-yearly intervals and report on trends against the baseline and make recommendations regarding the findings of the re-evaluation.

3.3.3           Old Parliament House management must implement the Human Impact Management Program.

3.4 Cyclical

Maintenance Program

3.4.1    The effectiveness of the Cyclical Maintenance Program must be monitored.

3.5 Recording works in progress and on completion

3.5.1    All works undertaken at Old Parliament House must be monitored and documented, during the works and upon completion, in order to create a record of change at Old Parliament House. The standard of recording will be that required in the Permitted Action Schedule or conditions of approval for an action.

3.6 Exhibitions and interpretation

3.6.1           Old Parliament House management must conduct evaluations of exhibitions and interpretation programs to assess their effectiveness in meeting their stated objectives.

3.6.2           Old Parliament House management must use the data collected in evaluation studies to update and improve interpretation and exhibition programs.

3.7 Works and events audits

3.7.1    Works and events must be randomly audited to ensure that heritage conditions in contracts and approvals are met.

 

 

LEASES

3.8 Monitoring lessees

3.8.1    Old Parliament House management must undertake regular inspections of leased areas and identify and rectify improper actions undertaken in leased areas.


4.   Communication and interpretation

 

Old Parliament House management must maintain ongoing consultation with community and government bodies regarding actions affecting the place, and will undertake a comprehensive program of interpretation of the heritage values to the community, both on-site and through a variety of outreach programs.

 

CONSULTATION

4.1 No actions

without relevant consultation

4.1.1    Action Proposals must fulfil the internal and external consultation requirements contained in the Heritage Management Plan (through the Action Proposal Form).

4.2 Community and stakeholder consultation

4.2.1           Old Parliament House management must pursue an active program of community consultation in relation to proposed actions that may have a significant adverse impact on the heritage values and may trigger the need for referral under the EPBC Act through which statutory community consultation will be undertaken.

4.2.2           Actions with the potential to have an impact on Indigenous heritage values must be preceded by appropriate Indigenous community consultation.

4.2.3           Old Parliament House management may establish a web-based information service that includes a notifications section on forthcoming events, open workshops, proposed actions (which may have a significant impact on the heritage values of the place) and provides opportunities for public comment on any matter.

4.2.4           Old Parliament House management may place public advertisements in relevant media, in addition to a web-based information service, to disseminate information regarding proposed actions and invite public comment.

4.2.5           Old Parliament House management may conduct an open public workshop as part of revising the use of a part of the place.

4.2.6           Old Parliament House management must consult with, and keep informed, the volunteers and staff at Old Parliament House in relation to proposed actions which may have a significant adverse impact on the heritage values.

 

 

PARTNERSHIPS AND MEMBERSHIPS

4.3 Partnerships and memberships

4.3.1           Old Parliament House management may actively pursue partnerships and memberships with private industry, universities, professional bodies and related institutions with a view to ensuring information- sharing, the promotion of the place to all sections of the community and the enhancement of heritage-management outcomes at Old Parliament House.

4.3.2           Old Parliament House management may become a member of, or maintain its existing membership of, relevant organisations.

4.3.3           Old Parliament House management may explore commercial partnerships with other institutions in Australia and elsewhere, and with private enterprise, that are likely to generate resources for the continued conservation of Old Parliament House and which will assist in promoting and telling the story of Australian democracy and Old Parliament House.

 

 

Volunteers

4.4  Volunteer

programs

4.4.1    Old Parliament House management may maintain and enhance its volunteers program.


Information Management

4.5 Sensitive

information

4.5.1           Old Parliament House management must recognise that it owns or controls a large body of potentially sensitive data. It must:

·   store all potentially sensitive documentation in a secure environment

·   disseminate and manage that data in an ethical manner

·   obtain written consent from relevant parties before recording or disseminating potentially sensitive data, and

·   act in accordance with the Privacy Act 1988, Freedom of Information requirements and the Commonwealth Protective Security Manual.

4.5.2           Old Parliament House management must identify appropriate stakeholders and community representatives and conduct appropriate Indigenous consultation in relation to the recording, storage or dissemination of information that may have Indigenous cultural values.

 

 

INTERPRETATION

4.6 Interpretation, exhibition and learning

4.6.1           Old Parliament House management must maintain and implement an interpretation plan that includes learning and exhibitions consistent with the Heritage Management Plan.

4.6.2           Old Parliament House management must engage in an active program of interpretation to advocate for and present the heritage values of the place, employing a wide range of media and aimed at a wide audience, including scholars, families, special interest groups and the public.

4.6.3           Old Parliament House management may, as part of the interpretation plan, explore ways of delivering interpretive material electronically, including the development and implementation of a web-based interpretation program that is accessible to the public.

4.6.4           Old Parliament House management may, as part of the interpretation plan, develop a program of interpretation based on the Old Parliament House zones based on a thematic approach and emphasising the identified heritage values.

4.6.5           Old Parliament House management may develop and implement, as part of the learning plan, specific learning strategies which are integrated with the national curriculum (primary and secondary schools) and university teaching programs.

4.6.6           As resources permit, Old Parliament House management may expand its off-site audience development through:

·   web-based activities

·   learning programs

·   events

·   outreach programs.

 

 

PROMOTIONS

4.7 Promotions and outreach

4.7.1           Old Parliament House management must maintain a marketing plan and an events plan, which includes the identification of ‘target audiences’ and the most effective means of engaging them. These plans must be consistent with the intent, objectives and Policies of the Heritage Management Plan.

4.7.2           Old Parliament House management may facilitate functions and events which do not have an adverse impact on the heritage values of the place and where the function or event may promote the heritage values to a new audience.

4.8 Signage/banners

4.8.1 Historic signage of heritage value must be conserved and retained in situ unless to do so would be inconsistent with significant health and safety considerations.


PROMOTIONS

 

4.8.2           All new signage in zones with a high sensitivity to change must be minimised.

4.8.3           Proposals for new signage and advertising banners at Old Parliament House, including tenants require an Action Proposal Form.

 

5.   Existing and future uses

 

Old Parliament House management must allow and facilitate only those uses of the place that are compatible with the heritage values of the place.

 

USES

5.1

Existing uses

5.1.1           Existing uses that are compatible with the heritage values of Old Parliament House may be maintained and enhanced.

5.1.2           Existing uses are any of the following:

·   interpretation and exhibitions – permanent and temporary

·   public programs – events, tours

·   learning – school programs, community learning, holiday programs

·   storage – for the Movable Heritage Zone

·   support services – plant rooms, amenities, lifts, stairs and light wells

·   commercial and public facilities – catering, functions, fine dining, café, kitchen areas and retail outlet

·   office areas – for Old Parliament House Staff and tenants.

5.1.3           Existing uses that are incompatible with the heritage values of the place must be discontinued or phased out.

5.2

Future uses

5.2.1           New uses are appropriate at Old Parliament House where these are consistent with the conservation of the place’s heritage values. This may include modifying an existing use or reinstating a former use.

5.2.2           New uses (including potential new tenancies) are proposed actions and must be assessed using the Action Proposal process described in the Heritage Management Plan.

5.2.3           Old Parliament House management must locate new uses (including potential new tenancies) in areas identified in the Heritage Management Plan as having a low sensitivity to change and/or where zone objectives facilitate it.

5.2.4           Old Parliament House management should implement a five-year spatial plan as approved by the Actions Committee.

5.3

Assessing Compatible Use

5.3.1           The relative compatibility of existing and potential new uses (including tenancies) should be assessed, based on their likelihood to maximise the conservation and understanding of the heritage values. The following three questions should be addressed for each proposal:

·   How does the proposed use contribute to and enhance the capacity to conserve and interpret the heritage values of Old Parliament House?

·   How will the proposed use have an impact upon the heritage values of Old Parliament House?

·   How does the proposed use have an impact on the objectives for the effected zone?

Uses should contribute, directly or indirectly, to the objective of interpreting the stories and heritage values of Old Parliament House.

 

5.3.2           The relative compatibility of uses should be assessed using the following definitions:

·   Very highly compatible: historically appropriate uses that continue or echo pre-1988 uses and retain the significant fabric and spaces of Old Parliament House in their pre-1988 state.


USES

 

·   Highly compatible: appropriate uses that, while not necessarily continuing pre-1988 uses, allow significance to be recognised, and make use of unaltered 1988 spaces or spaces altered after 1988 and subsequently reconstructed to their 1988 configuration.

·   Moderately compatible: appropriate uses, or new uses that allow significance to be recognised, that require limited adaptation works.

·   Less compatible: uses that are not sympathetic to pre-1988 uses (such as the use of offices for storage), or that require the substantial alteration of fabric (such as the removal of walls between rooms).

·   Least compatible: uses that are actively unsympathetic to pre-1988 uses (such as the use of ministerial rooms as kitchens), or that require large-scale alteration of fabric (such as the removal of walls between two or more rooms, or between corridors and rooms).

 

6.   Access, security, plant and services

 

Old Parliament House management must facilitate reasonable public access to the place and the movable heritage with full regard to the requirements to provide for public safety and security.

 

ACCESS

6.1 Public access to the place and the movable heritage

6.1.1           Public access to parts of Old Parliament House, and its movable heritage, is integral to conserving the heritage values of the place and must be facilitated in a manner that is consistent with the identified sensitivity to change, unless precluded by security or health and safety reasons.

6.1.2           Old Parliament House management may facilitate functions and events at Old Parliament House where these are consistent with the conservation of the heritage values.

6.1.3           Old Parliament House management must include a provision in all leases at Old Parliament House that ensures ongoing access to leased areas for the purposes of conservation, maintenance, monitoring and bona fide research.

6.1.4           Old Parliament House management must avoid functions and events that would restrict public access to the place or parts of the place for an extended period, and those that may place undue stress on the fabric of the building.

6.1.5           Old Parliament House management may encourage functions and events that enhance the interpretation of heritage values of Old Parliament House.

 

 

Security

6.2 Security

6.2.1           Security requirements for Old Parliament House must be guided by Commonwealth security management guidelines and directives and, from time to time, special security assessment and management will be required. Proposed security management measures may require an Action Proposal Form to be submitted.

6.2.2           Old Parliament House management must tailor security measures so that they have as small an impact as possible on the heritage values, visitor access and interpretation programs.

6.2.3           The Old Parliament House security plan must ensure the protection of persons and assets and, as far as possible, be consistent with the Heritage Management Plan.


Transport and Traffic

6.3  Transport

and traffic

6.3.1    Old Parliament House management must ensure a traffic and parking management plan in conjunction with the National Capital Authority which maintains the historical connection with motor traffic and meets the contemporary demands of visitor access and is consistent with the statement of intent and objectives of the Landmark Zone.

6.4 Building services

6.4.1           Pre-1988 building services must continue in use where they contribute to Old Parliament House’s heritage values, unless either of the following conditions apply:

·   the continued use would have an adverse impact on the heritage values

·   health and safety considerations preclude doing so.

6.4.2           Note that the treatment of pre-1988 building services should be consistent with the relevant Old Parliament House management strategy (where one exists). For instance, light management should be consistent with the Old Parliament House Light management strategy. Refer to the strategy and associated policies for direction.

6.4.3           Old Parliament House management must provide services to meet optimum environmental parameters for the conservation of the heritage values at Old Parliament House, in a manner consistent with

the conservation of heritage values.

6.4.4           Existing services must be maintained and potential new services assessed and introduced, in accordance with the procedures of this Heritage Management Plan.

6.4.5           The introduction of new services requires an Action Proposal Form unless stated in the Permitted Action Schedule.

6.4.6           Redundant pre-1988 building services should be conserved and retained (see Policies 1.4 and 1.5) and labelled as no longer in use.

6.5 Plant

6.5.1           New and replacement plant and plant rooms must be accommodated in existing pre-1988 plant rooms, where this is feasible and where this does not have an adverse impact on the heritage values of those areas.

6.5.2           Generally, accommodate new plant and plant rooms in areas identified as having a low sensitivity to change in this Heritage Management Plan where existing pre-1988 plant rooms cannot be used.

 

7.   Acquisitions, disposals and leasing

 

Old Parliament House management must ensure that all forms of disposal, acquisition and leasing are consistent with: the conservation of the heritage values of the place; with the overarching legislative and administrative requirements of government.

 

Movable heritage

7.1 Movable heritage (disposals)

7.1.1           De-accessioning from the collection will be considered if the item:

·   poses a preservation threat to other elements of the collection or itself

·   cannot be appropriately cared for

·   is no longer considered significant

·   is duplicated within the collection

·   has a substantial request from its donor for return

·   had been stolen or lost.

7.1.2           The process for acquisitions, de-accessions and disposals of collection items will be as described in the Collection Management Procedures.


Leases

7.2 Leases

7.2.1           Leasing parts of Old Parliament House is an action requiring assessment.

7.2.2           Where Old Parliament House management leases parts of the place, Old Parliament House management must ensure that the heritage values of the place are protected through:

·   compliance with the EPBC Act (sections 341ZE and 324ZA)

·   a lease or Memorandum of Understanding that contains appropriate clauses

·   a lease purpose which is compatible with the heritage values (see Policies 5.1 to 5.3).

·   a lease purpose which is consistent with corporate vision of Old Parliament House.

7.3 Access to leased areas

7.3.1    Old Parliament House management must include a provision in all leases at Old Parliament House that ensures ongoing access to leased areas for conservation, maintenance, monitoring and bona fide research purposes.

 

8.   Environmental management

 

Old Parliament House management must endeavour to maintain best practice in sustainable environmental management, with a strong emphasis on disaster preparedness planning, consistent with the conservation of the heritage values of the place.

 

CONSUMPTION OF RESOURCES

8.1 Environmental management system

8.1.1    Old Parliament House management must introduce an environmental management system that provides for the effective management of renewable and non-renewable resources, through identifying base level use and emissions and providing strategies to improve performance to meet identified targets.

 

 

BUILDING WASTE

8.2 Heritage value

8.2.1    Old Parliament House management must assess all building waste for potential heritage value prior to disposal, in accordance with Policy 1.5.

 

 

PEST MANAGEMENT

8.3 Pest control

8.3.1           Old Parliament House management must ensure that pest control is undertaken as part of an ongoing program, and in a manner that does not compromise heritage values or the environment through:

·   development and implementation of an integrated pest management plan, and ensuring its consistency with the heritage values of

Old Parliament House (particularly in relation to the use of chemicals on or near sensitive fabric and/or collection items)

·   understanding of the impact of control systems and chemicals on the conservation of heritage values

·   regular inspections

·   management of incoming material and pest vectors.

8.3.2           Old Parliament House management must store, inspect and fumigate all material entering the building where they may introduce pests.

8.3.3           Old Parliament House management must liaise with the NCA to ensure that the gardens are regularly inspected for evidence of pests and treated accordingly.


8.  Zones

8.1.  Background

The zones are the first point of call in the process of undertaking an action. They provide an initial snapshot of the heritage values of the place, and an indication of how spaces can and cannot be used or changed.

 

The zones have been developed based on the mapped heritage values of the place and their sensitivity to change. They provide a summary of the layering of these heritage values and emphasise areas where multiple values exist. They also encapsulate the overarching framework of linked management requirements and policies. Permitted actions apply to specific zones, this is described in more detail in Chapter 12.

 

The zones seek to convey these heritage values and managerial requirements by providing statements of intent supported by objectives. These statements of intent and objectives capture the intent of the policies and the core principles in order to assist in planning and decision-making.

 

Old Parliament House is divided into six zones:

 

Landmark Zone: the setting; the façade and other external faces; front, rear and side entrances; courtyards and light wells; plantings.

 

Chambers Zone: the House of Representatives and Senate Chambers; King’s Hall and the stairs leading to it; Public and Press Galleries.

 

Politics and Party Zone: all offices, suites and lobbies surrounding the Chambers Zone on the Main Floor; the Parliamentary Library; all offices and committee rooms on the lower floor surrounding the House of Representatives and Senate under-chambers and downstairs areas.

 

House of Representatives and Senate Wing Zone: the House of Representatives and Senate Wings.

 

Ancillary Functions Zone: the Members’ Dining Room and Kitchen; Billiard Room; Members’ Bar; Members’ Private Dining Room; Non-Members’ Bar; plant rooms; storage rooms; basements and courtyards.

 

Movable Heritage Zone: all objects and furniture designed and built, or acquired, during the period in which the Australian Parliament resided in the place.

 

Many management objectives are common across all of the zones.

 

8.1.1.  Landmark Zone

Rationale

This zone brings together a discrete suite of architectural, symbolic and landscape elements that can coherently and logically be considered as a single unit. The external appearance and setting of Old Parliament House are essential to the building’s landmark status and to the integrated urban design of the capital city conceived by Walter Burley Griffin. The façade and exterior faces are the most public, prominent and recognisable elements of the building and have been maintained in a single style and colour through different phases of modification or addition. As a result, the exteriors of all periods share the same heritage values and demand the same or similar management regimes. The front and rear entrances are integral to the Landmark Zone. Significant exteriors also continue throughout the building’s internal courtyards. These courtyards reflect a continuity of Murdoch’s aesthetic. The immediate curtilage to the building, including the grassed areas, trees and rose gardens, is an important component of the setting that remains within the landscape.

 

Location

Spaces: the setting; the façade and other external faces; front, rear and side entrances.


Statement of intent

To conserve and interpret the values of Old Parliament House through the management of its external appearance within its setting.

 

Objectives

1.        To conserve those features of the exterior embodying the place’s heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

2.        To remove intrusive elements where appropriate. (Refer to Policy 1)

3.        To facilitate appropriate public access for the purposes of telling the story of Australian democracy and the physical evolution of the place, without having an adverse impact on the heritage values. (Refer to Policies 4 and 6)

4.        To prevent undesirable change to the fabric which reduces its heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

5.        To ensure that this zone is managed in accordance with the policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan.

6.        To ensure that any change or use is consistent with the place’s heritage values and does not detract from the relationship of the place to its wider setting. (Refer to Policies 2 and 5)


Landmark Zone, lower floor and curtilage

This plan of the lower floor is marked with a block of green colour indicating the Landmark Zone. The area is shown surrounding the building to the National Heritage listing boundary and the internal courtyards are outlined in green.


8.1.2.  Chambers Zone

Rationale

The House of Representatives Chamber, the Senate Chamber, King’s Hall and its stairs, and the Galleries comprise a suite of contiguous spaces linked by Murdoch’s design, symbolic association and historical function. They have served as the physical and functional core of the building since its construction and represent the workings of Australia’s democratic system in physical and symbolic terms. The two debating Chambers are linked by a ceremonial space and are accessible to the public through the galleries and formal entrance. This collection of spaces is where the core business of government – in particular, the primary function of debating and passing of legislation – occurred. The spaces in this zone represent all the heritage values of the place.

 

Location

Spaces: the House of Representatives and Senate Chambers; King’s Hall; stairs leading to King’s Hall; Public and Press Galleries and offices.

 

Statement of intent

To conserve and interpret the values so that the zone remains the aesthetic and symbolic core of the place, and continues its role as a principal tool for telling the story of Australian democracy.

 

Objectives

1.        To facilitate public access for the purposes of telling the story of Australian democracy and the physical evolution of the place, without having an adverse impact on the heritage values. (Refer to Policies 4 and 6)

2.        To ensure the significant physical and intangible relationships between this and other zones are not compromised by inappropriate change or use. (Refer to Policy 5)

3.        To ensure that significant associations between the movable heritage elements and spaces are identified, retained and interpreted after documentation. (Refer to Policies 1 and 4)

4.        To ensure that the significant fabric and spaces are researched, monitored and conserved to the highest heritage standards. (Refer to Policy 1)

5.        To remove intrusive elements where appropriate. (Refer to Policy 1)

6.        To prevent undesirable change to the fabric which reduces its heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

7.        To ensure that this zone is managed in accordance with the policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan.

8.        To ensure that any change of use is consistent with the place’s heritage values and does not detract from the relationship of the place to its wider setting. (Refer to Policies 2 and 5).


Chambers Zone, upper and main floors

This image has two floorplans.  The plan of the upper floor is marked with blocks of green colour indicating the Chambers Zone. Areas marked include Chambers Press Galleries and the stairwells.   The plan of the main floor is marked with blocks of green colour indicating the Chambers Zone. Areas marked include the Chambers, Kings Hall and the front entrance.


8.1.3.  Politics and Party Zone

Rationale

The spaces within this zone were historically occupied by politicians and staff integral to the functioning of Parliament and the political process. They were occupied variously by those attached to the Senate or to the House of Representatives, by ministers and their staff and by members of the Opposition and their staff. It was within these spaces that the machinery of party politics operated, less publicly than in the spaces in the Chambers Zone (the debating chambers). It was in this zone that essentially ‘party-political’ decisions were made within a confined space that created a distinctively intimate environment.

 

The spaces, their furnishings and fittings share many of the same heritage values. They form a clearly readable spatial arrangement that encircle the House of Representatives and Senate Chambers on the Main Floor and the Lower Floor. They were witness to major events of Australian political history, often played out behind closed doors, and were occupied by some of the most prominent figures in Australian political history. The spaces, furnishings and fittings within this zone make up a suite of related spaces which share former functions and a common history.

 

Location

Spaces: all offices; suites and lobbies surrounding the Chambers zone on the Main Floor; the Parliamentary Library; all offices, lobbies and committee rooms and Parliamentary Broadcasting and ABC Studio on the lower floor surrounding the under-chambers and downstairs areas.

 

Statement of intent

To conserve and interpret the values within this zone, while ensuring public access.

 

Objectives

1.        To facilitate appropriate public access for the purposes of telling the story of Australian democracy and the physical evolution of the place without having an adverse impact on the heritage values. (Refer to Policies 4 and 6)

2.        To ensure the significant physical and intangible relationships between the spaces making up this and other zones are not compromised by inappropriate change or use. (Refer to Policy 5)

3.        To ensure that significant associations between the movable heritage elements and spaces are identified, retained and interpreted after documentation. (Refer to Policies 1 and 4)

4.        To ensure that the significant fabric and spaces are researched, monitored and conserved to a standard appropriate to their heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

5.        To remove intrusive elements where appropriate. (Refer to Policy 1)

6.        To prevent undesirable change to the fabric which reduces its heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

7.        To ensure that this zone is managed in accordance with the policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan.

8.        To ensure that any change or use is consistent with the place’s heritage values and does not detract from the relationship of the place to its wider setting. (Refer to Policies 2 and 5)


Politics and Party Zone, main and lower floors

This image has two floorplans.  The plan of the main floor is marked with blocks of green colour indicating the Politics and Party Zone. Areas marked include the central library wing, office spaces, corner offices, and hallways within the North Wing. There are also two small blocks of colour at the southern corner of the South West Wing.   The plan of the lower floor is marked with blocks of green colour indicating the Politics and Party Zone. Areas marked include the majority of hallways and offices within the North Wing


8.1.4.  House of Representatives and Senate Wing Zone

Rationale

From their construction in the 1960s until 1988, the House of Representatives Wing and Senate Wing were occupied principally by ministerial and members’ offices. The construction was the result of the expansion of the Parliament and government in response to the growing population of Australia. As such they share many characteristics of the Politics and Party Zone, although with a shorter history and generally fewer associations. Collectively, these offices have a shared history and function and similar social values and associations.

 

The location, spatial arrangement and confined spaces within this zone collectively reflect the growing and changing needs of the Parliament from its original construction through to the move in 1988. The wings were an addition to the original building and stand alone from the original design concept. The heritage values embodied in this zone have been compromised by recent contamination remediation works, which removed large amounts of original fabric and consequently reduced the ability of the fabric to demonstrate its values and associations.

 

Location

Spaces: the House of Representatives and Senate Wings.

 

Statement of intent

To facilitate new uses consistent with the heritage values of the zone, while conserving and interpreting those values and ensuring the interpretation of former uses.

 

Objectives

1.        To facilitate public access for the purposes of telling the story of Australian democracy and the physical evolution of the place, without having an adverse impact on the heritage values. (Refer to Policies 4 and 6)

2.        To ensure the significant physical and intangible relationships between the spaces making up this and other zones are not compromised by inappropriate change or use. (Refer to Policy 5)

3.        To ensure that this zone is managed in accordance with the policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan.

4.        To ensure that any change or use is consistent with the place’s heritage values and does not detract from the relationship of the place to its wider setting. (Refer to Policies 2 and 5)

5.        To prevent undesirable change to the fabric which reduces its heritage values.


House of Representatives and Senate Wing Zone, upper, main and lower floors

All three floors in this image are marked with blocks of green colour indicating the House of Representatives and Senate Wing Zone. Areas marked include the South East and South West Wings.


8.1.5.  Ancillary Functions Zone

Rationale

The spaces and other elements within this zone collectively relate to the activities undertaken essentially outside of the direct functions of government and of the Parliament. The zone principally embodies those areas relating to services, dining, recreation and storage.

 

The spaces for these activities are grouped together at the rear of the building on the Main Floor, on the Lower Floor for staff and non-members, and in basement areas. This is a reflection of design intent and is supported by the continuity of use. The designation of these facilities within a single zone conforms with the spatial, historical and functional logic of the areas, while the values embodied by this zone are common to all its principal areas. Many of the spaces were designed to be utilitarian workspaces or areas intended to be modified on an ongoing basis in response to the changing needs of the place. Many parts of the zone have also been modified over time with the result that the heritage values have been compromised to varying degrees.

 

Location

Spaces: the Members’ Dining Room and Kitchen; Billiard Room; Members’ Bar; Former Members’ Private Dining Room; Non-Members’ Bar; plant rooms; storage rooms; basements and courtyards.

 

Statement of intent

To continue to provide services and facilities consistent with the heritage values of the zone, while ensuring the conservation and interpretation of heritage values.

 

Objectives

1.        To provide opportunities for appropriate functions, events and activities without compromising heritage values. (Refer to Policies 4 and 6)

2.        To facilitate public access for the purposes of telling the story of Australian democracy and the physical evolution of the place, without having an adverse impact on the heritage values.

(Refer to Policies 4 and 6)

3.        To ensure the significant physical and intangible relationships between the spaces making up this and other zones are not compromised by inappropriate change or use. (Refer to Policy 5)

4.        To ensure that significant associations between the movable heritage elements and spaces are identified, retained and interpreted after appropriate documentation. (Refer to Policies 1 and 4)

5.        To ensure that the significant fabric and spaces are researched, monitored and conserved to a standard appropriate to their heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

6.        To remove intrusive elements where appropriate. (Refer to Policy 1)

7.        To prevent undesirable change to the fabric which reduces its heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

8.        To ensure that this zone is managed in accordance with the policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan.


 


 


8.1.6.  Movable Heritage Zone

Rationale

The movable heritage at Old Parliament House comprises a collection of artefacts with strong mutual associations between each other and to the building which together represent all the phases of the place’s development and its occupants. The mutual associations of the individual pieces of the collection mean that their value is greater than the sum of the parts. As a result, they may be regarded as a suite of related items requiring management. The collection embodies all of the heritage values at Old Parliament House and comprises an excellent representative sample in the broader context of Australian twentieth-century interior design and the fine and decorative arts. Individual items embody some or all of those values in their own right.

 

Statement of intent

To conserve and augment the movable heritage collection, while using it to tell the story of Old Parliament House.

 

Objectives

1.        To ensure that significant associations between the individual elements and sets of movable elements and spaces are researched, maintained and enhanced. (Refer to Policy 1)

2.        To restore elements of movable heritage to the context that interprets their heritage values. (Refer to Policy 4)

3.        To facilitate appropriate display for public access for the purposes of telling the story of Old Parliament House and the physical evolution of the collection without having an adverse impact on its heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

4.        To encourage the repatriation of objects that have been removed from the place. (Refer to Policy 1)

5.        To develop the collection through appropriate acquisitions. (Refer to Policies 1 and 7)

6.        To ensure that conservation, research and storage methods are of a standard appropriate to the heritage values. (Refer to Policy 1)

7.        To ensure that this zone is managed in accordance with the policies contained within the Heritage Management Plan.


9.  Use Plan

9.1.  Background

This Use Plan provides a broad sense of the current and possible changes to the use of the place.

 

Changes to the use of the place will be informed by the organisational strategic vision and elements in the Heritage Management Plan, including the core principles, policies and zones. Any changes to the use of the place must consider the long-term integrity of the heritage values of the place and be subject to approval through the Action Proposal Process (Chapter 11) and must consider Policy 5 in this Heritage Management Plan.

 

9.2.  Potential future uses

The use of the place, in particular any changes to it, will be reviewed and analysed in conjunction with the five-yearly reviews of the Heritage Management Plan.

 

Future uses will consider:

 

·         the heritage values of the place and their interpretation

·         how to monitor the impact of the change

·         the corporate objectives and the impact on organisational functionality

·         the care of the movable heritage collection. Future uses may trend towards:

·         increased visitor access

·         better disability access

·         opening up more areas of the building for exhibition, interpretation and learning activities

·         increased use of space for office accommodation

·         the provision of long-term collection storage solutions

·         the consolidation of use activities in the building by grouping activities of the same category in the same physical locations.

9.3.  Use Plan 2020

The following map shows how the building is used in 2020. Approved uses include the following:

 

·         Interpretation: Interpretation refers to both long- and short-term displays. Interpreted spaces often incorporate rooms that have been conserved and re-created to a particular era, to interpret the history and values of Old Parliament House. Interpreted spaces may include exhibition material, such as showcases, objects, labels, digital and multimedia content.

·         Exhibition: Exhibitions are long- and short-term displays that may include showcases, objects, labels, digital and multimedia content. Exhibition material may relate to Old Parliament House, the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House Collection, the Australian Parliament, Australia’s social and political history, or democracy.

·         Learning: Learning activities include public programs for on-site and digital visitors. Learning spaces may include an exhibition element.

·         Storage: Storage is for the collection and for museum support activities.

·         Support services: Support services include kitchens, plant rooms, lifts, basements and stairs.


·         Commercial functions: Commercial areas provide catering facilities and include restaurant, café, function and retail areas.

·         Office: Office areas are occupied by Old Parliament House staff or tenants.

·         Public circulation: Public circulation areas are primarily for visitors moving around the building. They can include an exhibition or interpretation element, if the conditions and security render them suitable for display and the exhibition does not block or impede the space as a main circulation route.

The Use Plan illustrates the primary use for each room. There are some rooms within the building that accommodate multiple-use activities; in such cases, the primary use has been illustrated.


 


 


 


 


10.  Monitoring and Review

10.1.  Monitoring

The implementation of this plan will be monitored through the following methods:

 

1.        Condition of values

The condition of values will be fully assessed at the time of the next review. Aspects of the tangible and intangible values will be monitored in a targeted way in association with changing uses and other actions.

 

2.        Action Proposal Process

All action assessment decisions by the Actions Committee will be recorded. Action Proposals and assessments will all describe the expected effects on the heritage values. The outcome of the action once implemented will also be recorded by the committee (see Chapter 11).

 

3.        Permitted actions

Any actions that sit outside the Permitted Action Schedule will be assessed by the Actions Committee and may be added to the schedule if required (see Chapter 12).

 

4.        Implementation Plan

The Implementation Plan will be assessed annually for progress and to ensure business plans capture the requirements of the plan by the Manager responsible for Heritage (see Chapter 14).

 

10.2.  Review

This Heritage Management Plan will be reviewed every five years in accordance with section 341X (Commonwealth Heritage Places) and section 324W (National Heritage Places) of the EPBC Act. A review will also be undertaken if any of the following occur:

 

·         the Commonwealth Heritage values or National Heritage values of the place change

·         major changes are proposed.

Future reviews may be conducted by an external party. Future reviews may be confined to possible amendments associated with:

 

·         pertinent new research findings or information

·         emergence of important previously unforeseen management issues that may have an impact on the heritage values of the place

·         the result of monitoring programs, where they indicate that the policies contained in the plan do not achieve the stated management objectives.

The plan will remain in force until such time as a new plan is adopted.


10.2.1.  Summary of previous review processes

2013 Review

In 2013 the first version of this Heritage Management Plan was reviewed by Old Parliament House staff. The main factors involved in the review were:

 

·         extensive consultation with Old Parliament House staff and key stakeholders (for example, the National Capital Authority and the Department of Environment) regarding the implementation and effectiveness of the 2008–2013 plan

·         notices inviting comment from the public published in a daily newspaper and on the agency website or social media sites

·         research on the implementation of the plan

·         an external assessment of the condition of the place in relation to heritage values as of 2013.

The feedback and results gained from these processes informed the amendments that in turn became the second version of this plan. Much of the feedback centred on the refinement of the implementation tools for the plan, with very little suggestion that policies and zones should be changed.

 

2020 Review

In 2020 a review was undertaken of the second version of this plan. The plan was reviewed Old Parliament House staff. The main factors involved in the review were:

 

·         extensive consultation with Old Parliament House staff, volunteers and key stakeholders (for example, the National Capital Authority and the Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment) regarding the implementation and effectiveness of the 2015–2020 plan

·         notices inviting comment from the public published in a daily newspaper and on the agency web and social media sites

·         review of the Action Proposal Process

·         development of the Heritage Management Interactive to improve the Action Proposal web form

·         integration of subsidiary management documents with the Heritage Management Plan, including the Old Parliament House management strategies

·         an external assessment of the condition of the place in relation to heritage values as of 2020.

The feedback and results from these processes informed the amendments that in turn became the third version of this plan. Much of the feedback centred on the refinement of the implementation tools for the plan. Very few changes were made to the policies and zones.


PART C: MANAGEMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION TOOLS

Part C of the plan outlines the management tools and associated implementation processes.

 

·         Chapter 11: Action Proposal Process sets out this key decision-making tool which is designed to implement the conservation policies and fulfil statutory requirements.

·         Chapter 12:The Permitted Action Schedule lists those actions that will have no adverse impact on the heritage values and do not require formal action assessment and approval.

·         Chapter 13: Old Parliament House Management Strategies describes how management strategies provide further guidance to staff managing the listed values.

·         Chapter 14: Implementation Plan identifies who will be responsible for implementing this Heritage Management Plan and its associated policies, and provides a timeframe for the policy implementation.

·         Chapter 15: Heritage Management Interactive describes how a web-based tool integrates

information from this Heritage Management Plan with the building and collection database to assist staff in management decision making.


11.  Action Proposal Process

11.1.  Background

The Action Proposal Process captures all relevant proposed actions in and on Old Parliament House

and provides a robust, transparent process for planning and decision-making. All decisions about matters which have the potential to have an impact on the heritage values and that require expert advice are addressed through this process.

 

The process is designed to fulfil the requirements of:

 

·         Schedule 5A Management Plans for National Heritage Places Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000 and Schedule 7A Management Plans for Commonwealth Heritage Places Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000.

and for external proposed actions:

 

·         Section 12(1)(b) of the Australian Capital Territory (Planning and Land Management) Act 1988

·         Appendix T6: Parliamentary Zone Master Plan of the National Capital Plan

·         The Parliament Act 1974.

The Action Proposal Process has been derived from consideration of the:

 

·         core principles

·         mapped heritage values

·         zones

·         policies

·         historical research for the room/area

·         physical description and condition data for room/area.

11.2.  How to use the Action Proposal Process

The Action Proposal Process is constructed around the zones and policies that provide relevant information on the place. The steps to follow when proposing an action are outlined below.

 

Actions include activities, projects, developments and undertakings that will occur on or in Old Parliament House and are more fully defined in the Glossary (see Appendix J). The Implementation Plan (see Chapter 14) is a list of tasks that enact the policies. While the Implementation Plan may be a starting point from which Action Proposals begin, it is in no way comprehensive and does not capture many of the events undertaken in the operation of Old Parliament House.

 

The Action Proposal Process begins with the identification of a proposed action and its location. The next step involves reference to this Heritage Management Plan to determine the zone in which the proposed action will take place; this can be done either via the Heritage Management Interactive or via an electronic or hardcopy of the plan. The determination of the zone will give an overview of the values and appropriate activities of the space.

 

From the zones, a check of the Permitted Action Schedule (see Chapter 12) will allow the responsible party to determine whether the action is allowed – following the guidelines of the schedule – or whether it will require assessment by the Actions Committee.


If the action is not specified in the Permitted Action Schedule, it will need to be assessed and approved by the Actions Committee before it can proceed. To do this, the Action Proposal Form must be completed and submitted to the committee.

 

The committee will make an assessment and will make a recommendation to the Delegate. The committee may recommend that the Delegate either allow the action, allow the action with modifications, not allow the action, request an alternative proposal or refer the action to the Commonwealth agency responsible for administering the EPBC Act. (A referral to that agency is necessary for actions that are likely to have a significant adverse impact on the heritage values of the place).

 

Refer to the Action Proposal flowchart at Figure 7 for further information.

 

11.3.  Documentation

Action Proposal Form

All actions are recorded as per Policy 3.1. Documentation of this Heritage Management plan.

 

The Action Proposal Form is completed using the Heritage Management Interactive (see Chapter 14).

 

Once an action has been endorsed by the committee and approved by the Delegate, two additional processes – the Action Amendment and the Project Record – are used to facilitate and record approval for work that is subsequent to, and associated with, an approved action.

 

Action Amendment

Action Amendments are used to gain approval for significant activities within an action project that has already been approved by the Delegate. They are often used on large-scale projects that have been approved in-principle via the Actions Committee process. In such circumstances, detailed information about the project is often only available after initial scoping, and the Action Amendment process is used to document and seek approval from the Actions Committee and Delegate for the specific methodology and details of the project that has been approved in-principle. This type of amendment has been used to cover whole-of-site projects, including lighting upgrades and Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) upgrades. An Action Amendment may also be used during the life of a project when issues arise or unexpected changes occur. In such instances, amendments document significant action details, such as additional works not covered in the original scope or a significant change in project methodology.

 

Action Amendments are prepared as a minute by the project officer, and require Actions Committee endorsement and Delegate approval before the specified work can be undertaken. Action Amendments are filed by the Actions Committee Secretariat with the relevant Action Proposal Form.

 

Project Record

The Project Record for approved actions is a form used to document and gain approval for minor activities within an action project that has already been approved by the Delegate. The Project Record for Approved Actions template is completed by the project officer in consultation with the Heritage and Collections Section and, if required, with other Old Parliament House staff or technical specialists.

 

Project Records do not require consideration by the Actions Committee; they are approved by Heritage staff and filed by the Actions Committee Secretariat with the relevant Action Proposal Form. Work cannot proceed without authorisation from the Manager of Heritage and Collections.

 

11.3.1.  Other documentation

Minutes

Minutes are used to formally present management information, such as new management strategies, heritage studies, and collection storage projects to the Actions Committee for consideration and endorsement before going to the Delegate for approval. The Actions Committee Secretariat files the minute


in the building and collection database and with the relevant documentation from the Actions Committee meeting.

 

Staff should consult with the Heritage and Collections Section to ensure they use the correct documentation process for their projects.


First identify your Action (see Glossary for definition of Action). Then identify the location in which the Action is to take place, and ask: Is the Action permitted as described in the Permitted Action Schedule? If it is then you can proceed in accordance with the Permitted Action Schedule. If the answer is no, then consult the Heritage Management Plan or the Interactive. Refer to the mapped zones, sensitivity to change, and the Old Parliament House management strategies and policies (if relevant), and ask: Is the Action appropriate for the Zone. If not you should stop the process. If the answer is yes, proceed with an Action Proposal Form and submit it to the Actions Committee. The Actions Committee will then assess the proposal and either provide direction on other information required, or make a recommendation to the Delegate. The Delegate will either approve the proposal, approve it with conditions, not approve it, or refer the proposal if it may have a significant adverse impact. If the Delegate approves the proposal the Action may proceed, and a closure report must be completed once the Action is complete. A referred proposal is considered by the Department responsible for administering the EPBC Act. If the Department approves the Action it may proceed, and a closure report must be completed once the Action is complete.

Figure 7: Action Proposal and Assessment Flowchart


12.  Permitted Action Schedule

12.1.  Introduction

The Permitted Action Schedule provides detailed guidelines on how permitted actions are to be undertaken. ‘Permitted actions’ are those actions which, if carried out according to the Permitted Action Schedule, will have no adverse impact on the heritage values, and therefore do not require formal action assessment and approval. Formal assessment and approval has been deemed granted for the Permitted Action Schedule under this plan. In other words, most routine or well-defined and planned actions that have been developed and refined for the place have been assessed for their ability to comply with the policies of this plan and their impact on the heritage value and have been documented as permitted in these schedules.

 

The Permitted Action Schedule provides a mechanism for implementing the policies and zone objectives set out in this plan. It provides both guidance for new staff and contractors and a way of reinforcing appropriate heritage management practice during daily or regular activities for existing staff and contractors. Any proposed action that is not outlined in the Permitted Action Schedule must be referred through an Action Proposal Form for approval.

 

Any staff member is welcome to make a submission to the Actions Committee with a proposal to undertake any action that falls outside the limits of these permitted actions. Any action not described below must be considered in the context of managing the risk to the heritage fabric and the heritage values. This schedule can be updated with the approval of the Actions Committee.

 

12.2.  Definitions

Contractor: a person or business that provides goods or services to Old Parliament House or otherwise operates in Old Parliament House but who are not staff, tenants or volunteers.

 

Exhibition: displays of exhibition material that includes but is not limited to showcases, objects, labels, plinths, multimedia equipment; usually long-term (that is, greater than one month display time).

 

Handling: physical movement of heritage items.

 

Heritage fabric: any pre-1988 building or collection material.

 

Heritage values: physical and intangible values as described in the National and Commonwealth Heritage listing for the place (see Section A).

 

Housekeeping: maintenance through cleaning and preventive conservation.

 

Interpreted spaces: rooms that have been conserved and re-created to a particular era to interpret

the history and values of Old Parliament House; these will include heritage furniture and may also include showcases, labels and multimedia equipment.

 

Movable heritage items: all pre-1988 collection pieces associated with the place.

 

Events (short-term): regular or one-off events or repeated programs in the place that include, but are not limited to, catered events, theatrical performances, concerts and lectures.

 

Programs: repeated programs in the place that include school groups, tours and lifelong learning activities.

 

Routine maintenance: tasks and activities that are carried out at regular, defined intervals or in an intermittent but planned manner.


12.3.  Use plan

Note: Some of the permitted actions relate only to specifically designated spaces; refer to the Use Plan at Chapter 5.

 

12.4.  Permitted Action Schedule

12.4.1.  Collection

Activity with or on the collection must be in accordance with the Collection Management Procedures.

 

Opportunities: To conserve the heritage values of the movable heritage collection.

 

Risks: That the movable heritage collection will be damaged or used in a manner inconsistent with its heritage values.

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Temporarily repositioning heritage furniture within a space for cleaning, exhibition set-up or other short- term activity using the safe-handling techniques.

Removal of movable heritage items from a space unless appropriate monitoring and recording by heritage staff.

Moving the heritage furniture within the areas designated for catering and commercial activities using the safe-handling techniques.

Adhesion of any sort of material directly to the surface or in an intrusive manner, including protective materials.

Movement and temporary replacement of the following heritage items by two trained people, for the purpose of an approved event:

·         Chairman of Committee’s chair

·         Clerk’s chairs

·         Prime Minister’s chair

·         Leader of the Opposition’s chair.

These chairs do not need to be moved for regular learning programs.

Repairs to movable heritage items without prior consultation with heritage staff.

Installing stable, non-abrasive, clean, hard or soft clear protective cover that is removable and does not require fixing to the heritage item to keep in place (that is, Mylar, acrylic sheeting with plastic bumpers).

Any change to use that has not been approved by Heritage staff.

Use of the piano in the Members’ Bar by a pianist on approval from Heritage staff.

 

 

 

Safe-handling techniques:

 

·         Always lift by a load-bearing piece (for example, the apron of a table or the seat of a chair), never by the legs, arms or back.

·         Always lift, never drag.

·         Avoid haste.

·         Regard every heritage item as irreplaceable.

·         All moves must be supervised by a staff member trained in appropriate handling techniques.

·         Plan the move and know the route to be taken, especially any doorways or lifts that need to be used.

·         Tie open doors with cotton tape to allow easier movement through them.


·         Examine the item before movement and note any weak spots or areas of damage and take careful note of any ornamental or decorative features.

·         Remove any loose sections (for example, drawers, cushions).

·         Make as few movements as possible.

·         Use a trolley if moving more than a few metres.

·         Do not overload the trolley and always ensure items are well balanced with no parts protruding.

·         Do not leave items, even temporarily, in vulnerable locations.

·         Use nitrile or white cotton gloves.

·         Some items are very heavy; always ensure your own safety.

12.4.2.  Equipment (props, sets, building maintenance, conservation, catering, filming, visitors etc)

Opportunities: Enhanced interpretation of the heritage values through reaching a wider audience; conservation of the heritage fabric.

 

Risks: Damage from knocking, scratching and inappropriate loads to floor coverings, plasterwork, timber and textiles; damage to soft furnishings from insect infestation.

 

a. Movement

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Transporting equipment and materials following an established safe access route.

Transporting through the building objects that do not easily fit through doorways and passages.

A minimum of two people to carry a load that is longer than 1.5 m.

Rolling or dragging equipment or material.

Goods must be transported on trolleys with wheels appropriate to the load and the vulnerability of the flooring in the planned route. For example, goods over 50 kg may be transported on trolleys with pneumatic tyres; lighter loads on trolleys with rubber tyres. For goods over 50 kg discuss movement options with heritage staff.

Bringing in props or equipment that may be have insect activity that have not been fumigated or quarantined.

Packing and unpacking in designated areas.

Using trolleys or other mobile equipment with solid wheels/castors on heritage surfaces, including wheelie suitcases.

Transporting organic material that has been fumigated prior to entry.

Carrying any item that may inadvertently knock/scrape objects in heritage spaces (this may include, but is not limited to, backpacks, umbrellas, large handbags etc).

Carrying small bags and placement of small bags on laps or floors, not on furniture.

 

Moving a maximum of 30 non-heritage stacking function chairs at one time on a trolley with rubber or pneumatic tyres.

 


 

 


b. Use
 

 


PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Long-term use of non-heritage historic items, cabinetry or replicas that are clearly marked as props.

Use of props and costumes which prohibit the performer/interpreter a clear vision unless that person is accompanied and guided by a person with clear vision.

Use of personal props and costumes that do not extend outside the direct control of the performer/interpreter.

The use of gaffer tape.

Use of larger costumes and props in the Landmark Zone provided they are not used closer than 2 m to the built heritage fabric.

The use of any plant material that has not been fumigated or sprayed with pyrethrum.

Equipment may be placed on heritage floor surfaces providing the equipment has rubber tipped feet, protective feet covers (that is, tennis balls) or is placed on protective covers (that is, carpet squares).

Filming using large cameras that obscure the photographer’s view of the immediate area unless the immediate area is clear and the camera is on a tripod.

Electrical equipment that has a current portable appliance test certificate.

Props, costumes or bags that have external buckles, hooks etc (excluding handbags) in Chambers or Politics and Party Zone.

Use of pencils, paper or tablets in Chambers, main floor Politics and Party Zone.

 

Use of laptops on heat/slippage protective sheet (short periods) or small stands (day-long) in the Chambers, main floor Politics and Party Zone.

 

Use of pens and ink in office areas and south wing Ancillary Functions Zone.

 

 

c. Storage

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Storing lightweight props and costumes in containers specifically for the use of storing these objects away from walls and on carpeted floors.

Storing exhibition crates, tools and equipment in areas not designated as storage.

Storing equipment in designated storage areas with protection to any heritage fabric.

Storing non-heritage stacked function chairs without suitable protective covering under the trolley.


12.4.3.  Displays and Exhibitions

Opportunities: Interpretation of heritage values through display.

 

Risks: Damage to heritage values through inappropriate display content, and damage to heritage fabric through inadvertent contact from display equipment; an overabundance of penetrations into the heritage fabric.

 

a.   Install/de-install

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Installing purchased non-heritage historic items or replicas that are clearly marked as props.

Embellishments (for example, window dressings, decals etc) to heritage fabric.

Installing freestanding or self-supporting showcases, hanging systems and other display furniture.

Provision of new wiring for multimedia installations.

Altering display furniture in areas designated for exhibition with provisions made to control dust and debris.

 

Unpacking and packing exhibition materials in areas designated for exhibition.

 

Fixing to non-heritage ceilings, walls, floors, doors and windows provided adhesives are unlikely to cause damage to nearby heritage fabric.

 

Temporarily altering egress routes and visitor flow.

 

Temporarily relocating heritage furniture to clear space for installation.

 

 

b.   Labels, banners, hanging track and signage

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Installing labels, banners and other signage onto non-heritage fabric.

Installing labels, banners and other signage onto heritage fabric using invasive methods.

Installing stable, non-abrasive, clean, hard or soft clear protective cover that is removable and does not require fixing to heritage fabric to keep in place.

Installing labels onto heritage fabric using double- sided tape.

If a sign has previously been attached with double- sided tape, a conservator or similarly skilled specialist must remove.

Signage with content that is in direct conflict with the values of the space.

Using UHU Tac White to attach small label to heritage fabric.

Installing freestanding labels that may be knocked or pushed and damage nearby heritage fabric.

 

Banners or signs that may impart oils or inks onto non-protected heritage surfaces.

Installing hanging track in areas designated for exhibition.

Installing hanging track in areas not designated for exhibition.


12.4.4.  Natural and artificial lighting

Opportunities: Promoting aspects of the place for better communication of heritage values.

 

Risks: Fading, brittleness and discolouration from the photo-oxidation of textiles, paper, pigment and leather.

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections of the luminaires to identify any damage, cracks, defects, marks or wear.

 

Structural inspections of the large fittings to determine structural certification.

 

Adding additional light fittings to existing lighting tracks.

Adding new lighting track systems.

Introducing freestanding blockout screens positioned directly in front of windows.

Installing blockout screens fixed directly to window frames or walls.

Installing removable, stable, non-abrasive, clean, clear protective UV, light and solar heat filter covers to internal windows.

Installing protective UV, light, solar heat filter covers that are fixed to any heritage fabric.

Temporary lights for events may be used if positioned away from fragile surfaces and cool UV- filtered lights are used (and turned off when not specifically needed). Lighting must align with the Collection Management Procedures for that particular space and collection.

 

Temporary lights for filming may be used if positioned away from fragile surfaces. Lighting must align with the Collection Management Procedures for that particular space and collection.

 

Altering light levels by using different globes in existing fittings.

Altering light levels by installing new fittings.

Altering light levels as described in the Collection Management Procedures to conserve historic objects.

Installing fixed light meters.

The use of flash photography (unless prohibited by copyright).

 

Removing lamps from redundant luminaries, but retain luminaire in situ.

Removal of decommissioned light switches.

Artificial light sources in areas with low sensitivity to change can be maintained and upgraded in accordance with Policies 28–53 of the Old Parliament House Light Management Strategy.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Light Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of natural and artificial light.


12.4.5.  Groups of people

Opportunities: Interpretation of the heritage values by engaging with the general public and student groups in the building.

 

Risks: Damage to the heritage fabric from physical contact with people; incremental change to the condition of heritage fabric from environmental fluctuations, dust, dirt, oil and wear and tear caused by people.

 

a.   General

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Guided tour groups through public areas of Old Parliament House led by staff or trained volunteers and approved contractors.

Access to and sitting on the Chambers central table chairs, Speaker’s chair, Consort’s chair and Vice- Regal chair.

Introduction of freestanding air conditioners, heaters, humidifiers, air filters, etc to maintain appropriate climatic conditions for the conservation of heritage material.

Uncontrolled, free access for visitors in Chambers’ galleries, excluding the House of Representatives Press Gallery.

Installing ropes and bollards at a sufficient distance from heritage items in order that the items do not get damaged if the bollard gets knocked.

Leaning or sitting on tables, arms of seating or bollards.

Repositioning movable heritage items out of reach of visitors within the same space.

Placement of objects on heritage furniture, unless objects are light, acid-free and previously approved by Heritage staff.

Access to the Chambers with a trained staff member or volunteer present is preferred.

 

 

 

Note: more detail can be found in the Chamber Use Guidelines

 

b.   School groups

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Visiting school groups are to:

·         be facilitated by a Learning presenter

·         enter through designated entries, primarily the orientation space

·         exit via ‘touch’ space

·         keep to the left in lobbies

·         walk on sacrificial carpet runners where in situ

·         wear white cotton gloves.

 

Groups of up to 20 students in Years 11 and 12 may self-guide after a heritage introduction from Schools Learning staff member if accompanied by a teacher.

Other self-guided student groups. Student groups should be accompanied by a Learning staff member for a pre-arranged program. If a group arrives on the weekend, a tour by a Visitor Services Officer can be provided.

School groups in the Chambers are to:

·         generally enter via lobby doors

·         sit one student per cushion in the House of Representatives backbenches and the Senate desks

Use of the front door by school groups unless part of a program in which the use of the front doors is specifically required.


PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

·         sit two students per cushion on the House of Representatives front bench

·         be encouraged not to fiddle with acrylic covers, telephones and chamber bins.

·         use modern seating for programs if approved by Heritage staff and stored out of sight when not in use.

 

Students and teachers permitted behind ropes when escorted by a Learning presenter.

 

 

c.   Numbers in a group

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Maximum number of seated people allowed per space:

·         House of Representatives Chamber: 128 downstairs, 46 in visitors’ gallery

·         Senate Chamber: 106 downstairs.

Large groups (greater than 30 people) in interpreted heritage rooms (without pre-approval from Heritage staff), excluding the Chambers and King’s Hall.

Groups of 30–45 people are permitted in interpreted heritage rooms on guided tours when the tour is conducted by an Old Parliament House staff member or trained volunteer and a risk- management process has been discussed with and pre-approved by Heritage staff. Risk management may include considering the tour route, the size of interpreted spaces, how and when heritage messages are delivered and asking tour participants to wear gloves.

Note: This maximum number does not apply to the Chambers and King’s Hall.

Uncontrolled, free movement of visiting groups (greater than 20 people), through public areas is not permitted without prior arrangement and approval, and can proceed only after a heritage induction from an Old Parliament House staff member.

 

 

Note: The numbers for seating in the Chambers are for one person per single cushion, two per double cushion etc. The aspect for the cushions most commonly requiring repair work is the area to the piping at the edges, and having people sit in the centre of the cushion will alleviate this. For conservation reasons, seating is only permitted on those benches that have a protective leather cover. The number for the House of Representatives visitors’ gallery does not include the front row in which a view of the chamber is obscured. While there are 46 seats in the Senate Chamber visitors’ gallery, this space is considered to be generally too fragile for use.

 

12.4.6.  Hospitality (food and drink)

Opportunities: To enhance the comfort of visitors and hospitality role of the agency and therefore allow for better interpretation of the heritage values.

 

Risks: Deterioration of the condition of the heritage fabric from food scraps, spills and insect infestation.

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

The temporary movement of heritage furniture within a space by trained staff for an approved catering event.

Any type of ad hoc food or drink in public spaces, except Commercial areas.

Provision of food and drink in areas designated as dining spaces as an organised approved event.

Cooking in areas not designated as kitchens or the courtyards.


PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Provision of water with no additives to a single speaker in public areas for the purposes of an event providing the vessel is placed on a tray

Provision of a jug of water, acidic, sugary or alcoholic drinks to a speaker in public areas for the purpose of an event.

Use of appropriate movable heritage items, such as tables, serving units, chairs, for catering as approved by Manager Heritage.

Resting serving plates etc on heritage fabric.

Use of the Members’ Bar piano during catered events by a pianist after approval by Heritage staff.

 

12.4.7.  Events and public programs

Opportunities: Interpretation of heritage values through interactive events.

 

Risks: Inadvertent discolouration or staining to carpets, textiles and leather fabric from wet or finely ground materials; physical damage to plasterwork and timber from knocking.

 

a.   Planning and set-up

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Event set-up in an area roped off with a minimum of 1 m clearance around the work area.

Introducing organic display material without fumigation or being sprayed by pyrethrum.

Leaving heritage items in the event area if they are well protected.

Placing function equipment on heritage fabric.

Planning events in spaces that require the least disruption to the placement of heritage items.

Using tape, especially gaffer tape, on heritage fabric.

Non-invasive theatrical interpretation throughout all public areas of the building for a group up to five actors.

Events that are in direct conflict with the heritage values of the space.

Introduction of non-fixed temporary floor coverings over heritage floors for event purposes (Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy, Policy 40).

Set-up that is not supervised and monitored by a trained staff member.

 

 

Note: More detail can be found in the Chamber Use Guidelines.

 

b.   Art workshops

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Conducting art workshops in designated Learning areas and in the Ancillary Functions Zone and courtyards upon approval from the Manager Heritage.

 

Use of pencils (preferably 2B) and paper in the Chambers and Politics and Party Zones.

Use of ink, glue, glitter, permanent pen, chalk and paint in the Chambers and Politics and Party Zones.

Handling items from the Learning Heritage Collection or replica items that have been prepared for Learning programs or display and are clearly marked as props.

 


12.4.8.  Contractors (caterers, building, filming, events etc)

Opportunities: Interpretation and conservation of heritage values through the inclusion of services of supervised contractors.

 

Risks: Deterioration of the condition of heritage fabric from poorly trained and unsupervised contractors.

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

A site visit prior to undertaking a contract at Old Parliament House is recommended.

Allowing a contractor who has not undertaken appropriate heritage awareness training to work in Old Parliament House.

Monitoring of contractor activity by a trained member of staff.

Contractors are not permitted to move heritage furniture unless supervised by a trained staff member.

12.4.9.  Conservation research

Opportunities: To better understand the heritage fabric and therefore better know and conserve the heritage values of the place.

 

Risks: The irreversible destruction of heritage fabric and diminishing of heritage values.

 

a.   Non-destructive techniques

 

Non-destructive investigative techniques are all permitted actions if heritage fabric is protected from tools/equipment and people movement during the inspections.

 

TECHNIQUE

DESCRIPTION

APPLICATIONS

ADVANTAGES

DISADVANTAGES

Visual inspection

Looking for visual clues about the physical nature or condition of heritage fabric.

All heritage fabric surfaces.

Quick; cost effective; may be reasonably carried out by an informed individual.

Best with an experienced person; may miss subtle or hidden clues, requires concentrated focus.

Surface mapping

Investigating sub- surface details using a high- powered, portable light at an angle to the flat surface.

examining surfaces in dark spaces. Can reveal detail of former attachments, repairs or alterations. Can help to verify need for further investigation.

Quick; cost effective; may be reasonably carried out by an informed individual.

Best with an experienced person; requires concentrated focus; may require access equipment.

Thermography

A rapid, remote technique to measure and record minute variations in the infra-red radiation which is emitted by all structures and can provide extensive information on the structure and

Locating and defining heat loss and moisture levels; locating structural timber, joints and in-filled openings; identifying bond failure and moisture ingress in render and

plasterwork, locating lintels,

Quick; usually no special access required.

equipment required.


TECHNIQUE

DESCRIPTION

APPLICATIONS

ADVANTAGES

DISADVANTAGES

 

condition behind the surface.

structural failures, snapped headers in brickwork.

 

 

Impulse radar

Powerful and versatile technique that allows the internal assessment of a wide variety of materials.

Identifying size, nature and disposition of structural components; location and condition of metallic inclusions(clamps, dowels, reinforcements); locating flues, chases in walls; locating voiding in materials; condition of mortar joints; micro- cracking; bulk moisture content; locating services and leaks.

Cost-effective solution to specific engineering problems; can be used on timber, stone, brick, concrete and ground strata; minimal disruption to environment.

Relatively expensive; interpretation of data is very complex and high level of expertise is required.

Ultrasonics

Technique that is often employed in medical or industrial fields but has applications in examining heritage fabric.

Locating decay, fractures and structural weakness in timber; assessing extent of decay on the surface of timber; checking fault planes and zones of weakness in stone; establishing depth of surface cracks, weathering decay or fire damage; verifying the effectiveness of consolidation and repair and the bond between individual stones.

Quick; reliable; inexpensive; can be used on very fragile stone or painted surfaces.

Access to opposing sides of material being tested can be a major limitation; high level of expertise required to interpret results; cannot be used where there are a number of discontinuities such as across a random rubble wall.

Moisture measurement

Technique using electrical resistance meters.

Measures moisture content on or just below the surface of building material.

Cost-effective; widely used.

Information can be inaccurate and of little value; more serious problems may remain hidden; false readings possible from salts in brickwork, foil behind plasterboard, high

carbon content, condensation or


TECHNIQUE

DESCRIPTION

APPLICATIONS

ADVANTAGES

DISADVANTAGES

 

 

 

 

old surface treatments.

 

b.   Destructive techniques

 

Destructive investigative techniques must:

 

·         be approved by the Actions Committee as no destructive techniques are permitted actions

·         only be considered after other forms of non-destructive techniques have failed to provide the required information

·         be undertaken by a conservator or otherwise skilled practitioner

·         be carried out in areas that are visually discreet, such as loose or previously altered decorative surfaces, above false ceilings, under raised floorboards, under easily temporarily moved hardware

·         include documentation of the ‘before and after’ condition of the affected heritage fabric.

 

TECHNIQUE

DESCRIPTION

APPLICATIONS

ADVANTAGES

DISADVANTAGES

Endoscopy

Equipment attached to a tube inserted by drill to 12 mm into a material.

Inspecting voids under floors or behind panelling; revealing hidden problems such as fungal growth.

Equipment is flexible and can be steered by inbuilt wires; possible to attach still or video camera to record findings; can record down to 2 mm.

Equipment is sophisticated and expensive; difficult to retain scale of image observed and manipulate the direction of the tip.

Micro-drilling

Very accurate method for assessing faults and variations due to decay and other defects of timber by drilling in a probe linked to a computer up to 200 mm, leaving a 1 mm hole.

Measuring severity of decay; calculating ratio of decayed timber to sound timber; assessing structural integrity; assessing condition behind surface and decorative finishes.

Easily interpreted information compared with other techniques, although still requires a skilled practitioner.

Should be used in conjunction with ultrasound to allow for innate differences in softness of timber types.

Laboratory analysis – paint

Identifying paint types and colours.

Recreation of heritage colour schemes.

High level of magnification capable of ascertaining subtleties between various layers including prime coats.

Destruction of sample; requires specialist analysis noting natural factors such as fading, colour shifting, yellowing and chalking.

Laboratory analysis – dendrochronology

Dating and identifying wood species

Matching new timber to existing.

Identification of timber is very accurate.

Slow; complicated in terms of requiring extensive data for climatic conditions, tree ring samples and requirements for samples.


TECHNIQUE

DESCRIPTION

APPLICATIONS

ADVANTAGES

DISADVANTAGES

Laboratory analysis – mortar and plaster

Establishing the composition of mortar and plaster.

Matching new mortar or plaster to existing.

Matching with existing mortar and plaster ensures the final appearance and strength of new materials integrates successfully.

Destruction of original sample; identified components may no longer be available.

12.4.10.  Routine maintenance

Opportunities: To conserve the condition of the heritage fabric while maintaining a safe and comfortable public space and enable interpretation of the heritage values.

 

Risks: To diminish the condition of the heritage fabric and values through inappropriate actions on the building.

 

a. Painting

 

i.   External

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Repainting the external walls as part of conservation/maintenance project or the Life Cycle Cost Plan using a paint type matching the existing or previously used finish.

 

Inspections of the paint finish to identify any defects.

 

Use of approved water based breathable external render paint product:

·         Brand: Klaas Coatings

·         Undercoat: Klaas Si-Prime

·         Paint: Klaas Si Rex03 – Silicone Resin Exterior Paint

·         Colour: OPH White

·         Formula: LTB 15L – TK2.75, RT 0.75.

 

 

ii.   Internal

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Repainting walls in areas designated for exhibition in any colour.

Repainting in non-heritage colours in areas not designated for exhibition.

Repainting heritage walls as part of a refurbishment/ conservation project with a paint type matching the existing or previously used finish or the following standard paint colours:

·         Ceilings: Old Parliament House Ceiling (Dulux or Haymes)

·         Walls: Old Parliament House Wall (Dulux or Haymes)

 


 

PERMITTED ACTIONS	NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS
•	Members Dining Room Corridors: Old Parliament House MDR Corridor (Dulux or Haymes).	
Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 


      b. Cement rendering

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any looseness, signs of dampness, cracks, bulges, peeling, blistering, mildew or other defects.

 

Replacement of render as part of a refurbishment/conservation project with a texture and colour of render to match existing.

 

 

c. Roofing

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections of all roof areas for loose fittings, leaks, holes, cracks, blockages, corrosion and general deterioration.

Replacing heritage fabric with new, unlike materials.

Refixing loose fittings or replacing with like fittings.

 

Cleaning of gutters, rainwater heads and sump.

 

Fixing holes in roof sheeting using a ubiquitous silicon product.

 

Installing non-fixed protective features that are clearly labelled as new and have no adverse visual impact.

 

 

d. Ceilings

 

i.   Plaster

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections of the ceilings to identify any defects, bulges, signs of water damage or other wear wearing nitrile gloves.

 

Patching and repairs should be undertaken by a trained conservator or a skilled specialist.

 

Repainting heritage ceilings as part of a refurbishment/ conservation project with a paint type matching the existing or previously used finish.

Repainting in non-heritage colours in areas not specified for exhibition.

 

ii.   Timber

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, cracking, splitting, marks or wear.

Inspections to identify any defects, cracking, splitting, marks or wear.

Repainting and/or refinishing as part of a refurbishment/conservation project with a product type to match existing finish.

Repainting and/or refinishing as part of a refurbishment/conservation project with a product type to match existing finish.


PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Patching and repairs should be undertaken by a trained conservator or a skilled specialist.

Patching and repairs should be undertaken by a trained conservator or a skilled specialist.

 

e. Timber panelling and joinery

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Temporary removal of floor hatches for the purpose of exhibition or interpretation display with appropriate recording by Heritage staff.

Forceful opening of cabinetry, safes or hatches.

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

Removal of doors for the purpose of exhibition or interpretation display.

Repairs to scratched or chipped surfaces must be undertaken by a conservator or a skilled specialist.

 

Opening cabinetry and safes that are unlocked unless the mechanism has been deemed too fragile by Heritage staff (that is, the Clerk of the Senate’s office safe should not be opened).

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                 

 

 

 

                                                                                      

                                                                                      


f.   Floors

 

i. Map

 

Heritage Flooring (Floor Types) – Upper floor

This plan of the upper floor is marked with blocks of colour indicating the heritage flooring types present on the floor. There are a combination of linoleum, carpet, timber, tiles, laminate, vinyl, and concrete on this floor.  The rest of the upper floor flooring types are not represented on this map.


 

 

 



Heritage Flooring (Floor Types) – Lower floor

 

This plan of the lower floor is marked with blocks of colour indicating the heritage flooring types present on the floor. Large portions of the North wing are shown to contain carpet. There are also combinations of linoleum, rubber, timber, tiles, vinyl, and concrete present.  The rest of the lower floor flooring types are not represented on this map.


 

 

 


     ii. Timber

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections of the floor substrate, surface finish and any inlaid fittings to identify any damage, cracks, twisted boards, squeaking, defects, marks or wear.

Mineral turpentine must never be used to clean timber floors as some have a bitumen bedding layer.

The use of carpet squares or other removable surfaces as a protective measure against scratches and spillages when moving objects or working within the area.

The use of gaffer tape. Other adhesive tape may only be used for short periods and as part of a conservation project.

The refinishing of timber floors undertaken as part of a conservation project (Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy, Policy 39).

Introduction of mats that require fixing to heritage floors.

Introduction of non-fixed and non-slip mats at entrances/exits to reduce dust and grit levels brought into the building.

 

The use of sacrificial covers over existing timber flooring in areas of high traffic (if not detrimental to the covered surface).

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of timber flooring.

 

iii. Carpet

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

Introduction of mats that require fixing to heritage floors.

If necessary, carpet can be taped with 3M471 tape or high grade painter’s tape.

The use of gaffer tape.

Repairs to edges or frayed seams by a conservator or skilled specialist using traditional techniques.

Pot plants on carpet.

Dry-cleaning using commercial grade equipment.

Wet-cleaning using domestic or commercial grade equipment.

The use of sacrificial covers over existing carpet in areas of high traffic (if not detrimental to the covered surface).

 

Introduction of non-fixed and non-slip mats at entrances/exits to reduce dust and grit levels brought into the building.

 

Introduction of non-fixed and non-slip mats at desk spaces (where fit for purpose and safe to do so).

 

Carpet with low sensitivity to change can be maintained and upgraded in accordance with Policies 48–51 of the Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of carpet floor coverings.


iv. Rubber, linoleum and tiles
 

 


PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

Introduction of mats that require fixing to heritage floors.

Repairs to edges or frayed seams by a conservator or skilled specialist using traditional techniques.

Pot plants on carpet.

Dry-cleaning using commercial grade equipment.

Wet-cleaning using domestic or commercial grade equipment.

The use of sacrificial covers over existing carpet in areas of high traffic (if not detrimental to the covered surface).

The use of gaffer tape.

Introduction of non-fixed and non-slip mats at entrances/exits to reduce dust and grit levels brought into the building.

 

Introduction of non-fixed and non-slip mats at desk spaces (where fit for purpose and safe to do so).

 

Surface coating as approved by Heritage as a sacrificial wear layer and its regular maintenance.

 

Rubber and linoleum with low sensitivity to change can be maintained and upgraded in accordance with Policies 52–55 of the Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Floor Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of rubber, linoleum and tile floor coverings.

 

g.   Windows

 

i.   Windows

 

Note: Application of light-filtering screens are described in the section on Natural and Artificial Light.

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

 

Repairs by a conservator or skilled specialist.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Light Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of windows.

 

ii.   Skylights

 

Note: Application of light-filtering screens are described in the section on Natural and Artificial Light.

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

 

Repairs by a conservator or skilled specialist.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Light Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of skylights.


     iii. Window coverings

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

 

Dry-cleaning using commercial grade equipment.

Wet-cleaning using domestic or commercial grade equipment.

Brush vacuuming or damp wiping venetian blinds.

 

Installation of new helioscreen blinds using existing screw holes.

 

Repairs by a conservator or skilled specialist.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Light Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of window coverings.

 

h.   Bathrooms

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

 

Repairs by a conservator or skilled specialist.

 

Fabric, fixtures and services in bathrooms with low sensitivity to change can be maintained and upgraded in accordance with Policies 28–48 of the Old Parliament House Bathroom Management Strategy.

 

Policies 49–53 of the Old Parliament House Bathroom Management Strategy (General bathroom maintenance and day to day management) can be applied to bathrooms with low sensitivity to change.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Bathroom Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of bathrooms.

 

i.   Lifts

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Inspections to identify any defects, marks or wear.

 

Repairs by a conservator or skilled specialist.

 

Maintenance and upgrade of lifts with low sensitivity to change in accordance with the Old Parliament House Lifts Strategy (Section 4.1).

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the relevant Old Parliament House Lift Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of lifts.


j.   Horticulture

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Removal of post-1988 trees and plants that have not been replanted to replace a pre-1988 design.

Specimens identified as pre-1988, significant, and remnant, including all roses, are not to be removed without agency approval.

Weeding and eradication of identified noxious plants located on site.

Changes to the vista other than those noted as permitted actions.

Staking and support of growing plants to ensure stability of plant species.

Installation of new growing structure without prior agency approval.

Pruning (for safety and aesthetics). Shrubs should be pruned to achieve desirable ornamental features of the particular specimens and to remove damaged or diseased parts. Plants should be pruned to prevent them from overgrowing footpaths, blocking gutters, impeding pest control access or preventing pedestrian or vehicular access. Care must be taken to protect significant specimens and the natural form of the plant when pruning for access.

Old Parliament House must obtain the consent of the National Capital Authority prior to affixing an external sign (including an illuminated sign), advertisement or notice on the land or building, regardless of whether the sign is temporary or permanent.

Dead, diseased or damaged limbs up to 200 mm diameter may be removed by garden maintenance personnel; thereafter, limb removal greater than 200 mm must be carried out by an arboriculturist or personnel approved by the agency.

 

Provision of top-soil, sub-soil, sand, mulch, fertiliser and gravel, as required.

Soil additions are to be free of other materials (for example, rocks, bricks, concrete or other materials which may inhibit growth)

Post-1988 graffiti removal.

Pre-1988 graffiti removal.

Improvement and maintenance of all vegetation, including lawns.

 

Training roses to grow onto pre-existing growing structures.

 

Irrigation repair and replacement, as required.

 

Plants may be divided and replanted in accordance with good horticultural practice where appropriate to the species.

 

Soil may be aerated and footing perimeter levels maintained, as required.

 

 

 

Note: Refer to the Old Parliament House Gardens and Plantings Management Strategy for detailed guidance on the management of horticulture.

 

12.4.11.  Unscheduled maintenance

Opportunities: To conserve the heritage fabric and to ensure the building remains compliant with building and access codes within the limits of sound heritage management.

 

Risks: Deliberate or accidental damage to heritage fabric from visitors, building occupants and contractors; incremental change to the building fabric having an adverse impact on the heritage values.


a.   Reporting damage

 

All damage to heritage fabric must be reported immediately once the area has been made safe and Security have been informed:

 

·         Minor damage can be reported to Heritage staff via the Facilities Helpdesk.

·         Major damage should be reported directly to Heritage staff.

·         Please refer to the Disaster Action Plan for a comprehensive approach to dealing with disasters.

·         Supervisors for contractors and caterers must provide a written report on any damage to the Manager Heritage.

·         Photographs of damage should be taken and included in the report.

 

b.   Preventing damage

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Plastic buckets or specialised bags for emergency illness stored on protected heritage surfaces.

Repairing gouges, scratches, tears or splits to heritage fabric without prior consultation with Heritage staff.

Installing stable, non-abrasive, clean, hard or soft clear protective furniture or flooring cover that is removable and does not require fixing to heritage fabric to keep in place.

 

 

c.   Unscheduled repairs

 

PERMITTED ACTIONS

NOT PERMITTED ACTIONS

Minor repair to heritage fabric provided it meets the following conditions:

·         required to comply with the Building Code of Australia and/or Workplace Health & Safety legislation

·         too small and/or urgent to realistically seek prior Actions Committee approval

·         has been discussed with and approved by Heritage staff

·         any heritage fabric removed is assessed by Heritage staff for significance and, if necessary, documented and kept.

Will include a record of the following detail:

·         precise clause for compliance

·         prior Heritage staff approval