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R83/2004 Orders/Civil Aviation as amended, taking into account amendments up to Civil Aviation Order 100.5 Amendment Instrument 2015 (No. 1)
Replacement of section 100.5 of the Civil Aviation Orders
Administered by: Infrastructure, Regional Development and Cities
Registered 14 Jan 2016
Start Date 22 Dec 2015
End Date 17 Oct 2018
Table of contents.

Civil Aviation Order 100.5 (General requirements in respect of maintenance of Australian aircraft) 2011 (as amended)

made under subregulations 30B (1) and 42A (6), regulations 38 and 43, subregulation 50A (2), regulation 50B and subregulation 50C (1) of the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988.

This compilation was prepared on 24 December 2015 taking into account amendments up to Civil Aviation Order 100.5 Amendment Instrument 2015 (No. 1).

Prepared by the Legislative Drafting Section, Legal Branch, Legal Services Division, Civil Aviation Safety Authority, Canberra.

Contents

Page

1A       Name of instrument................................................................................................... 1

1B       Commencement........................................................................................................ 1

1         Application............................................................................................................... 2

2         Interpretation............................................................................................................. 2

2A       Certain equipment not an aircraft component.............................................................. 3

3         Aircraft log books..................................................................................................... 3

4         Alternative to aircraft log book................................................................................... 4

5         Retention of aircraft maintenance records................................................................... 5

6         Maintenance releases for class A aircraft.................................................................... 6

7         Maintenance releases for class B aircraft.................................................................... 6

7A       Composite structures maintenance of specified aircraft.............................................. 7

8         Inadequate maintenance schedules............................................................................ 9

8A       Maintenance of airframe parachute systems............................................................. 10

9         Mandatory maintenance requirements....................................................................... 10

9A       Electronic navigational databases............................................................................ 11

10        Approved single engine turbine-powered aeroplanes (ASETPA)................................. 11

11        Additional maintenance requirements........................................................................ 11

12        Transitional requirements for additional maintenance................................................. 12

13        Approved SOM or maintenance schedules............................................................... 13

14        Approval of certain maintenance data....................................................................... 13

           Appendix 1............................................................................................................. 15

           Attachment 1 to Appendix 1..................................................................................... 31

           Appendix 2............................................................................................................. 37

           Notes to Civil Aviation Order 100.5 (General requirements in respect of
maintenance of Australian aircraft) 2011....................................................................
42

1A      Name of instrument

                 This instrument is Civil Aviation Order 100.5 (General requirements in respect of maintenance of Australian aircraft) 2011.

1B       Commencement

                 This Order commences on gazettal.

1          Application

       1.1     Subject to paragraph 1.2, this section applies to all Australian aircraft in respect of which an Australian certificate of airworthiness is in force, other than an aircraft to which Part 42 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 applies

       1.2     CASA may, in writing, determine that this section, or a specified provision of this section, does not apply to an Australian aircraft specified in the determination.

       1.3     Before making a determination, CASA must take into account any relevant considerations relating to the interests of safety.

2          Interpretation

       2.1     In this section, unless the contrary intention appears:

aerial application operation or application operation has the same meaning as in regulation 137.010 of CASR 1998.

AMD means approved maintenance data, which has the same meaning as in regulation 2A of CAR 1988.

approved maintenance program has the same meaning as in Part 42 of CASR 1998.

CAR 1988 means the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988.

CASA maintenance schedule means Schedule 5 of CAR 1988.

CASR 1998 means the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998.

CAO means Civil Aviation Order.

civil aviation legislation means the Civil Aviation Act 1988 (the Act), and any legislative instrument made under, or for the purposes of, the Act, including regulations, CAOs, Manuals of Standards and other instruments.

covered by a maintenance program, for an aircraft, means an aircraft covered by an approved SOM or maintenance schedule under Part 4A of CAR 1988 (Part 4A) that incorporates the additional maintenance requirements set out in Appendix 1.

DOT means the United States Department of Transportation.

SOM means a system of maintenance dealt with under Division 3 of Part 4A and approved under regulation 42M of CAR 1988.

STC or supplementary type certificate means a supplemental type certificate covered by Subpart 21.E of CASR 1998.

TAC or type acceptance certificate means a type acceptance certificate issued under regulation 21.029A of CASR 1998.

TC or type certificate has the same meaning as in regulation 21.041 of CASR 1998.

time-in-service, in relation to an aircraft, means the time from when the aircraft leaves the ground on a flight until it touches the ground for the purpose of landing at the end of the flight.

time-in-service, in relation to an aircraft component, means the time during which a component is installed in an aircraft, being the time commencing from the moment the aircraft leaves the ground on a flight and ending when it touches the ground for the purpose of landing at the end of the flight.

Regulations means the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988.

2A       Certain equipment not an aircraft component

    2A.1     For a regulation mentioned in paragraph 2A.5, a headset used in an aircraft is not an aircraft component within the meaning of subregulation 2 (1) of CAR 1988 if the headset:

(a)   is not mentioned in the AMD for the aircraft; and

(b)   either:

             (i)  is maintained in accordance with the service instructions issued by the manufacturer of the headset (the service instructions); or

            (ii)  if there are no service instructions — is at least subject to a visual check by the pilot in command before a flight in which the headset is used.

Note 1   See also paragraph 233 (1) (a) and subregulation 242 (1) of CAR 1988 under which the pilot in command of an aircraft has certain responsibilities regarding instruments, equipment and radio apparatus.

Note 2   Paragraph 2A.1 replaces instrument CASA 307/03 which is not in force.

    2A.2     For a regulation mentioned in paragraph 2A.5, night vision goggles (NVG) used in a helicopter is not an aircraft component within the meaning of subregulation 2 (1) of CAR 1988 if the NVG is maintained:

(a)   in accordance with approved maintenance data for the NVG within the meaning of regulation 2A of CAR 1988; and

Note   See, for example, CAO 82.6.

(b)   by an organisation mentioned in paragraph 2A.3.

Note   Paragraph 2A.2 replaces instrument CASA 347/07 which is not in force.

    2A.3     For subparagraph 2A.2 (b), maintenance of NVG must be carried out by an organisation that:

(a)   complies with regulation 30 of CAR 1988 or Part 145 of CASR 1998 as if the regulation or the Part applied to the organisation for the maintenance of NVG and its related equipment; and

(b)   is endorsed by the manufacturer of the NVG as an appropriate organisation to carry out maintenance on the NVG.

    2A.4     To avoid doubt, for paragraph 2A.2, maintenance includes the routine scheduled servicing of NVG.

    2A.5     For paragraphs 2A.1 and 2A.2, the regulations are as mentioned in Table 1. 

Table 1

Item

CAR 1988

Item

CAR 1988

1

30

6

42W

2

39

7

42WA

3

41

8

42ZA

4

42A

9

42ZP

5

42L

10

305

Note   The following regulations in CAR 1988 are not affected by subsection 2A: r. 47 (maintenance release endorsement); r. 52 (defect reporting); r. 52B (defective component preservation); r. 53 (defect investigation); and r. 242 (testing of radio apparatus).

3          Aircraft log books

       3.1     For the purposes of subregulation 50A (2) of the Regulations, CASA’s instructions in relation to aircraft log books are set out in paragraphs 3.2 and 3.3.

       3.2     An aircraft log book must:

(a)   identify the aircraft and the type and model of engine and propeller fitted to the aircraft and must state whether the aircraft is equipped for I.F.R. operations, V.F.R. (Day) operations or V.F.R. (Night) operations; and

(b)   identify the aircraft’s maintenance program (including details of maintenance release inspections); and

(c)   identify any approved variations or exemptions to the aircraft’s maintenance schedules; and

(d)   have provision for the recording and certification of maintenance carried out on the aircraft; and

(e)   have provision for the recording and certification of maintenance carried out on the aircraft’s engine and, if applicable, the propeller; and

(f)    contain a record of when the engine and, if applicable, the propeller, was installed or removed and a record of the date and aircraft time-in-service of the installation or removal; and

(g)   contain a record of when any time-lifed components were installed or removed, including a record of the date and aircraft time‑in‑service of the installation or removal; and

(h)   contain a record of compliance with all applicable airworthiness directives, including a record of the date and time-in-service of the compliance; and

(i)    contain a summary of any changes to the empty weight of the aircraft; and

(j)    have all log book sections incorporating certification pages sequentially numbered, and bound or held together in a way that protects each page from inadvertent misplacement, loss or removal.

       3.3     An aircraft’s log books, and documents referred to in an aircraft’s log book, must be made available to CASA and to persons engaged in maintenance on the aircraft.

Note   If an aircraft log book fully complies with the requirements of paragraph 3.2, there is no requirement that it be submitted to CASA for approval. It must, however, under paragraph 3.3, be made available to CASA on request. It must also be made available to each person engaged in maintenance on the aircraft. If a document does not fully comply with the requirements of paragraphs 3.2 and 3.3, subsection 4 may apply to it.

4          Alternative to aircraft log book

       4.1     The use, in relation to an Australian aircraft, of an alternative to an aircraft log book (alternative aircraft log) is approved, subject to the following conditions:

(a)   the alternative aircraft log must comply with the conditions in paragraphs 4.2 and 4.3;

(b)   the use must be the subject of a written confirmation of approval from CASA.

       4.2     An alternative aircraft log must comply with the instructions set out in paragraph 3.2, including subparagraph 3.2 (j) but only as if subparagraph 3.2 (j) reads as follows:

(j)    have all parts of the aircraft log book which incorporate certification pages or certification records managed in accordance with a secure system (which may be or include an electronic system), which sequentially or chronologically numbers or orders each page, and protects it from the following:

             (i)  any inadvertent misplacement, loss, or removal;

            (ii)  any inadvertent deletion, amendment, alteration or erasure;

           (iii)  any deletion, amendment, alteration or erasure:

(A)    that is not immediately visible on the face of the document; or

(B)    for an electronic system — that cannot be traced through the system to identify the user who made the deletion, amendment, alteration or erasure;

           (iv)  any deletion, amendment, alteration or erasure that renders the previous version illegible, or inaccessible in the system.

Note   Under subregulation 50B (5) of the Regulations, it is a strict liability offence if a person engages in conduct that results in the alteration of any entry in an alternative to an aircraft log book (including electronic versions) if: (a) the alteration is not a single line through the words to be struck out; and (b) the words struck out do not remain visible.

       4.3     Following written confirmation of approval from CASA, an approved alternative aircraft log must be made available in an easily accessible and usable form:

(a)   to each person engaged in maintenance on the aircraft; and

(b)   to CASA at any time on request.

       4.4     In the application of paragraph 3.2 to an alternative aircraft log (including subparagraph 3.2 (j) as amended by paragraph 4.2), references in the paragraph to an aircraft log book are to be read as references to an alternative aircraft log.

       4.5     In this subsection, references to an alternative aircraft log include references to an alternative section of an aircraft log book.

5          Retention of aircraft maintenance records

       5.1     For the purposes of subregulation 50C (1) of the Regulations, CASA directs that aircraft maintenance records must be retained in accordance with paragraph 5.2.

       5.2     Aircraft maintenance records must be retained for the following periods:

(a)   in the case of an aircraft log book — a period of 1 year commencing immediately after the aircraft’s operating life has ended or the aircraft has been permanently removed from the Register of Australian Aircraft;

(b)   in the case of an engine log book — a period of 1 year commencing immediately after the engine has been permanently withdrawn from use;

(c)   in the case of a propeller log book — a period of 1 year commencing immediately after the propeller has been permanently withdrawn from use;

(d)   in the case of a Major Assembly History Card and Component History Card — until certification is made for the next overhaul following the last overhaul or a period of 1 year commencing immediately after the component has been permanently withdrawn from use, as the case requires;

(e)   in the case of a maintenance release — a period of 1 year commencing after the aircraft’s operating life has ended or the aircraft has been permanently removed from the Register of Australian Aircraft, as the case requires;

(f)    where certifications are made on documents other than aircraft log books:

             (i)  in the case of the record for certification for completion of a mandatory inspection, test or check which is required to be repeated at specified intervals — until a subsequent certification has been made for the completion of the inspection; and

            (ii)  in the case of the record for certification for completion of a mandatory inspection, test or check which is not required to be repeated and for completion of a modification, major repair or the installation of a major aircraft component — a period of 1 year commencing immediately after the certification; 

(g)   in the case of a copy of a maintenance release held by the authorised person who issued the maintenance release — a period of 1 year commencing immediately after the date of issue.

       5.3     If an Australian aircraft is exported from Australia the aircraft’s maintenance records must accompany the aircraft.

6          Maintenance releases for class A aircraft

       6.1     For the purposes of subregulation 43 (1) of the Regulations, CASA directs that the maintenance release for a class A aircraft is the maintenance release that is identified in an operator’s maintenance control manual.

       6.2     Subject to regulation 47 of the Regulations, a maintenance release for a class A aircraft remains in force only for the period specified in the manual.

       6.3     A copy of the maintenance release must be retained by the person issuing it.

       6.4     Before a maintenance release for a class A aircraft is issued, it is to be signed by:

(a)   the person certifying for the co-ordination of the maintenance release inspection; or

(b)   where the maintenance release inspection has been certified by 1 person, that person;

                 using the procedures specified in the certificate of approval holders procedures manual.

       6.5     The person signing a maintenance release must ensure that the following information is recorded on the maintenance release at the time it is issued:

(a)   the aircraft type, and the registration mark of the aircraft, to which the release relates;

(b)   the name of the certificate of approval holder issuing the maintenance release;

(c)   the place, date and time, of issue of the release;

(d)   the date on which, and the total aircraft time-in-service when, the maintenance release ceases to be in force;

(e)   the total time-in-service of the aircraft at the time of issue of the release;

(f)    all requirements and conditions relating to maintenance (other than daily inspections) required to be carried out on the aircraft by the Regulations and Orders during the period the maintenance release is to remain in force, including the total time-in-service or date, as applicable, at which that maintenance is due;

(g)   any permissible unserviceabilities carried over from the previous maintenance release.

7          Maintenance releases for class B aircraft

       7.1     For the purposes of subregulation 43 (1) of the Regulations, CASA directs that the maintenance release for a class B aircraft is 1 of the following:

(a)   the CASA Maintenance Release Form 918;

(b)   the CAA or CASA Maintenance Release Form DA741, but only until stocks of this form, acquired or printed in bulk before 22 December 2015, have been exhausted;

(c)   an alternative form approved in writing by CASA.

       7.2     Subject to regulation 47 of the Regulations and paragraph 7.3, a maintenance release for a class B aircraft remains in force for whichever of the following periods ends first:

(a)   a period not exceeding 1 year;

(b)   the aircraft time-in-service that is identified by the certificate of registration holder in the aircraft’s log book statement as the period for which the maintenance release is to remain in force.

       7.3     Subparagraph 7.2 (b) does not apply to private class B aircraft being maintained to the CASA Maintenance Schedule.

       7.4     Before a maintenance release for a class B aircraft is issued, it is to be signed by:

(a)   the person certifying for the co-ordination of the maintenance release inspection; or

(b)   where the maintenance release inspection has been certified by 1 person — that person;

                 and the person must be present during the time the maintenance release inspection is being performed.

       7.5     The person signing the maintenance release must ensure that the following information is recorded on the maintenance release at the time it is issued:

(a)   the information referred to in paragraph 6.5;

(b)   for private class B aircraft being maintained annually to the CASA Maintenance Schedule — all calendar time maintenance due for the next 12 months and a reasonable estimate, based on the aircraft’s operating cycle, of maintenance due on a time-in-service basis.

       7.6     The information required under subparagraph 7.5 (b) must be recorded in the “Maintenance Required” section of the maintenance release.

       7.7     For subregulation 43 (2) of CAR 1988, if:

(a)   an authorised person uses the CASA Maintenance Release Form 918 as a form of maintenance release for an aeroplane engaged in an aerial application operation conducted at night; and

(b)   the aeroplane is not equipped and certificated under Part 21 of CASR 1998 for night V.F.R. flight;

                 then, the specified information to be entered on the form before it is issued must be modified as follows:

(c)   the “Equipped for” box must be struck through or cross-hatched out;

(d)   in the “Operational Category” box the following words must be entered: “Application operation — night”.

7A       Composite structures maintenance of specified aircraft

    7A.1     In this subsection:

CAR 30 maintenance organisation means the holder of a certificate of approval under regulation 30 of CAR 1988 for carrying out maintenance on aircraft, aircraft components or aircraft materials.

CAR 1988 means the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988.

CASR 1998 means the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998.

composite maintenance means maintenance of the composite structures of a composite structure aircraft.

composite structure aircraft means an aircraft of fibre reinforced plastic composite construction.

Group 7 LAME means the holder of an aircraft maintenance engineer licence issued under regulation 31 of CAR 1988 and endorsed with a category airframes Group 7 rating as described in Civil Aviation Order 100.91 (CAO 100.91).

specially qualified person means a person who:

(a)   holds a category B1 licence issued under Part 66 of CASR 1998; and

(b)   is also 1 of the following:

             (i)  a person who at any time before 27 June 2011 was a Group 7 LAME, provided that the person’s licence had not been cancelled by CASA; or

Note   The relevant rating may, or may not, have expired, and may, or may not, have been renewed as long as it had once been held and the licence has not been cancelled.

            (ii)  a person to whom regulation 202.342 of CASR 1998 applies who would have been a person mentioned in sub-subparagraph (b) (i) but for the suspension of his or her licence on or before 26 June 2011, provided that the suspension has been revoked by CASA; or

           (iii)  a person for whom CASA determines under regulation 202.343 or 202.344 of CASR 1998 that it would have issued an aircraft maintenance engineer licence under regulation 31 of CAR 1988, endorsed with a category airframes Group 7 rating as described in CAO 100.91; or

           (iv)  a person who holds at least 1 of the following:

(A)    AQF qualification MEA405B;

(B)    a Transport Canada AME licence endorsed with an “S” rating;

(C)    a New Zealand AME licence endorsed with an aeroplane Group 4 rating;

(D)    another qualification approved in writing by CASA as an appropriate qualification for performing composite maintenance.

specified aircraft means an aircraft specified in Table 1.

    7A.2     Composite maintenance on a specified aircraft must be carried out by:

(a)   a Part 145 organisation; or

(b)   a CAR 30 maintenance organisation.

    7A.3     If composite maintenance is carried out on a specified aircraft by a CAR 30 maintenance organisation, the organisation must ensure that only a specially qualified person, employed by the organisation, performs the maintenance.

Note   Apart from the separate privileges of a Part 145 organisation, composite maintenance of a specified aircraft may only be performed by a qualified person employed by a CAR 30 maintenance organisation. Therefore, such maintenance may not be carried out by a person referred to in paragraph 42ZC (4) (b) of CAR 1988, sometimes known as an independent LAME or a LAME employed by an independent LAME.

Table 1 — Specified composite structure aircraft

Aerodesign Pulsar

Extra 300/300S

Quickie Q1/Q2 Series

Buchanan BAC 204

Grob 520 Egrett

Quickie 200

Cirrus SR20/SR22

Grob G115

Rand KR2

CoZ Cosy

Gyroflug SCO1B-160

Rutan Defiant

Diamond DA 40

HOAC DV 20 Katana/
Diamond DA 20A1

Rutan Long Eze

Diamond DA 42

III SkyArrow 650

Rutan Vari Eze

Diamond DV22/DA22

Jabiru LSA

Stoddard Hamilton Glasair Series

Diamond HK-36

Lancair/Columbia Series

Stoddard Hamilton Glastar

Eagle X/XTS Series

Liberty XL2

 

8          Inadequate maintenance schedules

       8.1     For the purposes of subregulation 42A (6) of the Regulations, CASA declares that the manufacturers’ maintenance schedules for the following aircraft are inadequate and must not be used as the maintenance schedules for the aircraft:


Aero 145;

Aero L40;

Aero L200A;

Aero Commander 500 (excluding the 500S model);

Auster, all aircraft;

Avro, all aircraft;

Beagle Airedale;

Beagle Terrier;

Beechcraft 17;

Beechcraft 18;

Beechcraft 50;

British Aircraft Manufacturing Co. Swallow;

Callair A9;

Chrislea CH 3-4;

De Havilland DH60 (Moth);

de Havilland DH82 (Tiger Moth);

de Havilland DH 84 (Dragon);

de Havilland DH87 (Hornet Moth);

de Havilland DH89 (Dragon Rapide);

de Havilland DH90 (Dragonfly);

Fairchild 24;

Junkers A50;

Klemm, all aircraft;

Lockheed L-12;

Percival Gull;

Percival Proctor;

Piaggio P166;

Piper J2;

Piper J3;

Piper PA11;

Piper Colt;

Piper Tripacer;

Piper PA23 Apache;

Piper PA25 Pawnee;

Porterfield, all aircraft;

SAAB 91;

Stinson, all aircraft;

WACO, all aircraft, other than WACO Classic Aircraft Corporation YMF‑F5 and YMF‑F5C series aircraft that have FAA supplemental type certificate SA1000GL incorporated at manufacture.


Note   Acceptable alternatives for these aircraft are the CASA Maintenance Schedule or a schedule developed by the holder of the certificate of registration for an aircraft and approved by CASA under regulation 42M of the Regulations.

8A       Maintenance of airframe parachute systems

    8A.1     In this subsection:

approved course of training means a course of formal training, or a period of relevant practical experience, or both a course of formal training and a period of practical experience:

(a)   designed to:

             (i)  convey detailed knowledge of GARD equipment, and the aircraft controls, systems and precautions for use of such equipment; and

            (ii)  in the light of such knowledge, enable the holder of a relevant category B1 licence to safely perform maintenance on GARD equipment; and

(b)   approved in writing for the licence holder by his or her CAR 30 maintenance organisation.

CAR 30 maintenance organisation means the holder of a certificate of approval under regulation 30 of CAR 1988 for carrying out maintenance on aircraft, aircraft components or aircraft materials.

general aviation recovery device (GARD equipment) means an airframe parachute system which is installed on an aircraft and which, however it is activated and the parachute deployed, is designed to control the aircraft’s descent in an emergency such as engine failure or loss of aerodynamic control.

specially qualified LAME means a licensed aircraft maintenance engineer who:

(a)   holds a category B1 licence, issued under Part 66 of CASR 1998 in a subcategory relevant to the aircraft on which the person performs work; and

(b)   has successfully completed an approved course of training in the operation and maintenance of GARD equipment.

    8A.2     Maintenance of GARD equipment must be carried out by:

(a)   a Part 145 organisation; or

(b)   a CAR 30 maintenance organisation.

    8A.3     If maintenance of GARD equipment is carried out by a CAR 30 maintenance organisation, the organisation must ensure that only a specially qualified LAME, employed by the organisation, may perform the maintenance.

Note   Apart from the separate privileges of a Part 145 organisation, maintenance of GARD equipment may only be carried out by a specially qualified LAME employed by a CAR 30 maintenance organisation. Therefore, such maintenance may not be carried out by a person referred to in paragraph 42ZC (4) (b) of CAR 1988, sometimes known as an independent LAME or a LAME employed by an independent LAME.

9          Mandatory maintenance requirements

       9.1     For subregulation 38 (1) of the Regulations, CASA directs the registered operator of an Australian aircraft to comply with the mandatory maintenance requirements identified in the aircraft’s approved design as 1 or both of the following:

(a)   the Certification Maintenance Requirements (CMR);

(b)   airworthiness limitations (AWL).

Note 1   Approved design is defined in subregulation 42.015 of CASR 1998.

Note 2   Contravention of a CASA maintenance direction under this subsection is a strict liability offence under regulation 38 of the Regulations.

       9.2     For paragraph 9.1:

Certification Maintenance Requirements or CMR means the required scheduled maintenance tasks which were established during the design certification of an aircraft as operating limitations of the aircraft’s type certificate (TC) or supplemental type certificate (STC).

9A       Electronic navigational databases

    9A.1     The pilot in command of an aircraft may update the navigation system database of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) of an aircraft on the following conditions:

(a)   the pilot must be authorised under CASR 1998 to use the GNSS;

(b)   the pilot must be authorised by the person responsible for continuing airworthiness of the aircraft to update the navigation system database of the GNSS of the aircraft;

(c)   he or she may only use data that is supplied by an organisation that is approved in writing by CASA to provide the data;

(d)   he or she may update the navigation database system only if it involves the insertion into the navigation data unit of a data card, a disk or a similar device;

(e)   he or she must ensure that the update of the navigation database system is carried out in accordance with the instructions of the manufacturer of the GNSS navigation equipment.

10        Approved single engine turbine-powered aeroplanes (ASETPA)

     10.1     For subparagraph 174B (2) (d) (ii) of CAR 1988, a single engine turbine-powered aeroplane is approved for charter operations that involve the carrying of passengers for hire or reward in flights at night under the V.F.R. if it:

(a)   complies with each of the requirements mentioned in Part 1 of Appendix 2; and

(b)   is approved in writing by CASA in the STC, TAC or TC for the aeroplane.

Note   Under subparagraph 174B (2) (d) (i), the aeroplane operator must also hold a CASA approval for the conduct of the operation.

     10.2     For subparagraph 175A (1) (d) (ii), a single engine turbine-powered aeroplane is approved for charter operations that involve the carrying of passengers for hire or reward in flights under the I.F.R. if it:

(a)   complies with each of the requirements mentioned in Part 1 of Appendix 2; and

(b)   is approved in writing by CASA in the STC, TAC or TC for the aeroplane.

Note   Under subparagraph175A (1) (d) (i), the aeroplane operator must also hold a CASA approval for the conduct of the operation.

     10.3     When CASA is providing an operator approval under subparagraph 174B (2) (d) (i) or 175A (1) (d) (i), each of the requirements mentioned in Part 2 of Appendix 2 will be assessed by CASA as part of the approval.

11        Additional maintenance requirements

     11.1     This subsection contains CASA directions for subregulation 38 (1) of the Regulations.

Note   Contravention of a CASA maintenance direction under this subsection is a strict liability offence under regulation 38 of the Regulations.

     11.2     Subject to subsection 12, the registered operator of an Australian aircraft that is not covered by a maintenance program must comply with, and ensure compliance with, each additional maintenance requirement set out in Appendix 1 as it applies to or for the aircraft.

12        Transitional requirements for additional maintenance

     12.1     For subclauses 3.2 and 3.4 of Appendix 1, the first pitot-static system leaks tests required after 1 August 2013 must be carried out not later than the date when whichever of the following first occurs:

(a)   the day that is 24 months from the date of the last verified pitot-static system leak test that is at least of a standard equivalent to that under clause 1 in Attachment 1 to Appendix 1; or

(b)   if there is no such verified pitot-static system leak test — when the first pressure altimeter tests mentioned in subclause 4.2 required after 1 August 2013 are carried out or should be carried out under subsection 12.2; or

(c)   if paragraph 3.4 (b) or 3.4 (c) of Appendix 1 applies — the first occasion after 1 August 2013 of the change or modification mentioned in paragraph 3.4 (b), or of the maintenance mentioned in paragraph 3.4 (c).

     12.2     For subclauses 4.2 and 4.4 of Appendix 1, the first pressure altimeter tests required after 1 August 2013 must be carried out within 24 months after the date on which the last pressure altimeter tests required under the following were carried out, or should have been carried out, before 1 August 2013:

(a)   Requirement 1 of Airworthiness Directive AD/INST/8 Amdt 4;

(b)   Requirement 1 of Airworthiness Directive AD/INST/9 Amdt 6.

  12.2A     For subclauses 4.2 and 4.4 of Appendix 1, the first pressure altimeter tests required after 1 August 2013 must be carried out within 36 months after the date on which the last pressure altimeter tests required under the following were carried out, or should have been carried out, before 1 August 2013:

(a)   Requirement 2 a. of Airworthiness Directive AD/INST/8 Amdt 4;

(b)   Requirement 2 a. of Airworthiness Directive AD/INST/9 Amdt 6.

     12.3     For subclauses 4.6 and 4.7 of Appendix 1, the first automatic pressure altitude encoder tests required after 1 August 2013 must be carried out not later than the date when whichever of the following first occurs:

(a)   the first pressure altimeter tests mentioned in paragraph 12.2, and in conjunction with those tests; or

(b)   if subclause 4.8 applies — the first occasion after 1 August 2013 of the removal or the installation of, or a change to, or a modification to, a system component or the system interwiring.

     12.4     For subclauses 5.2 and 5.4 of Appendix 1, the first airspeed indicator tests, including determination of the scale error of the aircraft’s installed airspeed indicator, required after 1 August 2013 must be carried out:

(a)   not later than the day that is 48 months from the date of the last verified airspeed indicator test that is at least of a standard equivalent to that under subclause 5.3 in Appendix 1; or

(b)   if there is no such verified airspeed indicator test — when the first pressure altimeter tests mentioned in subclause 4.2 required after 1 August 2013 are carried out or should be carried out under paragraph 12.2.

     12.5     For subclauses 6.2 and 6.4 of Appendix 1, the first determination of the accuracy of the aircraft-installed system for measuring fuel required after 1 August 2013 must be carried out:

(a)   not later than the day that is 48 months from the date of the last verified determination of the accuracy of the aircraft-installed system for measuring fuel that is at least of a standard equivalent to that under subclause 6.3 in Appendix 1; or

(b)   if there is no such verified determination of accuracy — when the first pressure altimeter tests mentioned in subclause 4.2 required after 1 August 2013 are carried out or should be carried out under paragraph 12.2.

     12.6     In this subsection:

verified in relation to a test means recorded in one of the following for the relevant aircraft:

(a)   the aircraft log book;

(b)   the approved alternative to the aircraft log book;

(c)   the approved alternative to a particular section of the aircraft log book.

13        Approved SOM or maintenance schedules

                 If:

(a)   the holder of a certificate of registration for an aircraft uses 1 of the following as the aircraft’s system of maintenance or maintenance schedule:

             (i)  an approved SOM;

            (ii)  the manufacturer’s maintenance schedule;

           (iii)  the CASA maintenance schedule; and

(b)   the approved SOM or the schedule does not include the maintenance required by Appendix 1;

                 then, the maintenance required by Appendix 1 must be carried out in addition to the maintenance in the approved SOM or the schedule.

14        Approval of certain maintenance data

     14.1     Subject to paragraph 14.2, instructions in an advisory document (however described) (a relevant document) published by the European Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) or the National Airworthiness Authority of a recognised country, relating to how maintenance on an aircraft, an aircraft component or aircraft material is to be carried out, are approved for paragraph 2A (2) (e) of CAR 1988.

Note   The approval under this paragraph of certain instructions in a relevant document as maintenance data under paragraph 2A (2) (e) of CAR 1988 does not constitute approval of a modification or repair for the purposes of regulation 42U of CAR 1988. The approval under this paragraph only provides for the instructions in the relevant documents to be used to supplement the information in an approved modification or repair in relation to how that modification or repair may be carried out.

     14.2     The approval under paragraph 14.1 of the instructions in a relevant document is subject to the condition that the instructions may only be used if:

(a)   the maintenance data mentioned in paragraph 2A (2) (a), (b), (c) or (d) of CAR 1988 for the aircraft, aircraft component or aircraft material does not provide sufficient detail on how the maintenance is to be carried out; and

(b)   the person carrying out the maintenance on the aircraft, aircraft component or aircraft material first determines that the instructions are:

             (i)  appropriate to the aircraft, aircraft component or aircraft material to be maintained; and

            (ii)  directly applicable to the maintenance that is to be carried out; and

           (iii)  not contrary to, or inconsistent with:

(A)    the manufacturer’s data; or

(B)    any other applicable AMD mentioned in regulation 2A of CAR 1988.

     14.3     In this subsection:

recognised country has the same meaning as in regulation 21.010B of CASR 1998.

Note   The recognised foreign countries are:

(a)     Canada; and

(b)     France; and

(c)     Germany; and

(d)     New Zealand; and

(e)     Netherlands; and

(f)      United Kingdom; and

(g)     United States of America.

Appendix 1

Additional maintenance requirements

Note   For the timing of first tests under this Appendix after 1 August 2013, see subsection 12 of this Order.

1          Definitions

                 For this Appendix:

tests, for an instrument or instrument system, means the procedures, in accordance with this Appendix, and used in conjunction with the relevant aircraft manufacturer’s approved data, that are required to confirm the accuracy and correct functioning of the instrument or system.

Note   The tests described in this Appendix are not comprehensive or exclusive test procedures and for this reason must be used in conjunction with the relevant aircraft manufacturer’s approved data.

2          Balloon etc. intervals

                 Despite the interval mentioned in any other provision to this Appendix, where a provision to this Appendix applies for an aircraft that is a balloon or a thermal airship without an approved SOM, the interval is not to exceed 36 months.

Note   Under civil aviation legislation and for this Appendix, a balloon or a thermal airship falls within the scope of the word “aircraft” unless specifically excluded.

3          Pitot-static systems

       3.1     This clause applies to an aircraft’s pitot-static systems.

       3.2     Tests must be carried out on an aircraft for pitot-static system leaks.

       3.3     For subclause 3.2, the tests must be carried out in accordance with each of the testing procedures set out in clause 1 of Attachment 1 to this Appendix.

       3.4     The tests mentioned in subclause 3.2 must be performed:

(a)   at intervals not exceeding every 24 months; or

(b)   if any pitot-static system components, including instruments, are changed or modified — at the same time as the change or modification, and then at intervals not exceeding every 24 months after that time; or

(c)   if maintenance is carried out on the pitot-static system that involves disconnection of any of the pitot-static lines — at the same time as the maintenance, and then at intervals not exceeding every 24 months after that time.

4          Testing pressure altimeters and air data computers

       4.1     This clause applies to an aircraft’s testing pressure altimeters and air data computers (if any).

       4.2     Subject to subclause 4.3, the pressure altimeters installed in an aircraft must be tested in accordance with:

(a)   each of the testing procedures set out in clause 2 of Attachment 1 to this Appendix; or

(b)   each of the applicable testing procedures of a recognised foreign national airworthiness authority (NAA) listed in regulation 21.012 of CASR 1998 that is the NAA of the state of design for the aircraft.

       4.3     For an aircraft certificated for single-pilot operations:

(a)   the pilot’s pressure altimeter must be tested under subclause 4.2; and

(b)   any other pressure altimeter that is not tested must be appropriately placarded to that effect.

       4.4     The pressure altimeter tests mentioned in subclause 4.2 must be carried out at intervals not exceeding every 24 months.

Note 1   Test errors must not exceed those specified for pressure altimeters in Attachment 1 to this Appendix.

Note 2   Appropriate test equipment may allow pressure altimeter tests to be carried out either while the altimeter is installed on the aircraft, or in a workshop.

       4.5     Any air data computer installed in an aircraft must be tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s maintenance manual.

Note   Electronic displays do not require testing.

            Automatic altitude reporting equipment correspondence checks

       4.6     If any of the following devices are installed in an aircraft:

(a)   an automatic pressure altitude encoder;

(b)   an air data computer;

(c)   any equivalent device reporting directly to air traffic control (ATC) via the aircraft’s transponder;

                 the device must be tested in accordance with each of the testing procedures set out in clause 3 of Attachment 1 to this Appendix.

Note   Test errors must not exceed those specified in Attachment 1 to this Appendix for the relevant encoders, computers or other devices.

       4.7     Subject to subclause 4.8, the automatic pressure altitude encoders mentioned in subclause 4.6 must be tested in conjunction with the aircraft’s pressure altimeter tests mentioned in subclause 4.2.

Note   See subclause 4.4 for the interval.

       4.8     If the following apply:

(a)   an aircraft uses a separate direct reading altimeter for the primary control of altitude;

(b)   the aircraft has an automatic altitude reporting system comprising a separate automatic pressure encoder, air data computer, or other equivalent device reporting directly to ATC via the aircraft’s transponder;

                 then the reporting system must be tested in accordance with subclause 4.6 on each occasion of the removal or the installation of, or a change to, or a modification to:

(c)   a system component; or

(d)   the system interwiring.

5          Airspeed indicator

       5.1     This clause applies to an aircraft’s airspeed indicators.

       5.2     The airspeed indicator tests, including determination of the scale error of the aircraft’s installed airspeed indicator must be determined through testing in accordance with subclause 5.3.

       5.3     For subclause 5.2, the scale errors at the major graduations of the scale must not exceed ± 4 knots up to the maximum speed of the aircraft, when tested first with the pressure increasing, and then with the pressure decreasing. During the test, operation of the airspeed indicator must be smooth and continuous.

       5.4     Airspeed indicator tests, including determination of the scale error of the aircraft’s installed airspeed indicator, must be performed at intervals not exceeding every 48 months.

6          Fuel quantity gauges

       6.1     This clause applies to an aircraft’s fuel quantity gauges.

       6.2     The accuracy of an aircraft-installed system for measuring fuel (the system) must be tested and determined.

       6.3     For subclause 6.2, the determination must be made in accordance with the following test requirements:

(a)   subject to the tolerances mentioned in this subclause — the indicated quantity of fuel must equal the actual fuel in the fuel tank less the unusable quantity of fuel;

(b)   fuel quantity gauges must be checked for accuracy at all major graduations;

(c)   subject to paragraph (d) — scale errors at empty must not exceed + 0.5% or – 5% of the nominal fuel tank capacity;

(d)   for a system where it is impracticable to correct the empty reading — scale errors at empty must not exceed + 0.5% or – 8% of the nominal fuel tank capacity;

(e)   if either of the following apply:

             (i)  scale errors or the ungaugeable quantity of fuel exceeds ± 5% of the nominal fuel tank capacity; or

            (ii)  the gauge is calibrated in fractions of fuel tank capacity;

        then, a placard must be displayed adjacent to the fuel quantity gauge showing:

           (iii)  the corrected readings at all major graduations; and

           (iv)  the ungaugeable quantities of fuel;

(f)    fuel quantity gauges must be checked with the aircraft positioned to simulate level flight attitude;

(g)   for paragraph (f):

             (i)  electrically operated gauges must have normal system voltages applied; and

            (ii)  the fuel quantity at each calibration point must be made by:

(A)    measurement of the fuel added to the fuel tank; or

(B)    a dip or drip stick previously calibrated for the fuel tank;

(h)   during the test, the motion of any fuel quantity gauge must be smooth and continuous.

       6.4     Determination of the accuracy of the system must be performed:

(a)   at intervals not exceeding every 48 months; and

(b)   if any system component or system interwiring is changed or modified — at the same time as the change or modification, and then after that at intervals not exceeding every 48 months.

7          Propeller systems

Application

       7.1     This clause applies to an aircraft’s fixed-pitch wooden or composite propellers.

Checks

       7.2     Within the intervals mentioned in subclause 7.3, the following checks must be performed:

(a)   all propeller attachment bolts and hub retaining nuts must be checked to ensure they have the appropriate torque;

(b)   the propeller track must be checked to ensure that the blades are rotating in the same plane of rotation;

(c)   the propeller hubs and blades, including their surface finish, must be checked for breaks, scores, nicks, cracks, delamination, corrosion, and the security of the leading edge sheath, to confirm the continuing airworthiness of the propeller.

Note   Where AMD for a specific propeller system is not available, the inspection, maintenance and field repair methods contained in FAA AC 20-37E, or subsequent revisions, should be used.

       7.3     Each check mentioned in subclause 7.2 must be carried out as follows:

(a)   after the first flight following a propeller fitment;

(b)   when there has been significant change in the average ambient humidity, due to a seasonal change or a change in aircraft locality;

(c)   before a first flight after the aircraft has been idle for an extended period.

Intervals

       7.4     Each check mentioned in subclause 7.2 must be carried out at intervals not exceeding whichever of the following happens first:

(a)   every 110 hours in service, or every 110 hours in service after a check for an event mentioned in paragraph 7.3 (a), (b) or (c);

(b)   every 12 months after manufacture, or every 12 months after a check for an event mentioned in paragraph 7.3 (a), (b) or (c).

8          Feathering propellers — functional check

Application

       8.1     This clause applies to a piston engine aircraft fitted with 1 or more feathering propellers, other than a powered glider.

Checks

       8.2     Within the intervals mentioned in subclause 8.3, the aircraft feathering propeller must be given a ground functional check in accordance with the manufacturer’s procedures and instructions for feathering and unfeathering the propeller to ensure that the propeller fully feathers within the time limits specified by the aircraft manufacturer.

Intervals

       8.3     The check mentioned in subclause 8.2 must be carried out at intervals not exceeding whichever of the following happens first:

(a)   every 110 hours in service;

(b)   every 12 months after manufacture;

(c)   the compliance times that have been published as AMD.

9          Cockpit voice recording systems

Application

       9.1     This clause applies for a cockpit voice recording system (CVRS) installed on an aircraft for compliance with CAO 20.18 (Aircraft equipment — basic operational requirements).

Testing

       9.2     Each voice channel of the CVRS must be tested in accordance with this subclause to ensure proper recording of each of the following audio inputs:

(a)   for the first channel — from each microphone and headset used at the First Officer’s position;

(b)   for the second channel — from each microphone and headset used at the Captain’s position;

(c)   for the third channel — from the flight deck mounted area microphone;

(d)   for the fourth channel — from each microphone and headset used at the station for the third and fourth crew positions;

(e)   if the positions mentioned in paragraph (d) of this subclause are not required — from each microphone and headset used at other flight deck positions having audio selection and transmit facilities;

(f)    if the positions mentioned in paragraphs (d) and (e) of this subclause are not required — from each microphone on the flight deck that is used with the passenger address system, if its signals are not recorded on another channel;

Note   The CVRS may need to be removed post-flight and replayed to objectively analyse the quality of the audio recorded on each discrete channel, and where applicable, the correct recording of the ATM data-link messages and related functionality.

       9.3     The bulk erase inhibit logic of the CVRS must be tested to ensure that it is functioning properly.

       9.4     The CVRS underwater locating device (if fitted) must be tested and maintained in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements and recommendations.

       9.5     Crash sensor switches incorporated into the CVRS power feed must be tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s procedures to ensure they are operating properly.

Intervals

       9.6     Each of the tests mentioned in this clause must occur at intervals not exceeding:

(a)   for equipment utilising analogue technology (tape based):

             (i)  every 12 calendar months; or

            (ii)  2 000 hours’ time-in-service;

        whichever happens first; or

(b)   for equipment utilising digital technology (solid state based), every 24 calendar months.

10        Emergency exits

Application

     10.1     This clause applies to an aircraft which has an emergency exit, except when the emergency exit:

(a)   is a service door; or

(b)   is a normal means of entering or exiting the aircraft; or

(c)   would be destroyed when operated, for example, a window that is to be smashed open, or a fabric panel that is to be ripped aside.

Testing

     10.2     With the aircraft in its normal operating configuration, including all trim and interior fittings installed, the emergency exit must be operated, and operable, in accordance with the placarded instructions.

     10.3     If the emergency exit’s operating mechanism is protected by a breakable cover, the cover may be removed before testing the exit.

     10.4     In spite of any other provision in this clause, an emergency exit must be tested when role equipment or interior configuration is changed in a way that may inhibit operation of the exit.

Intervals

     10.5     The exit must be tested at intervals not exceeding:

(a)   for an unpressurised aircraft — every 12 months;

(b)   for a pressurised aircraft — every 6 months.

11        Life rafts, life jackets and inflatable flotation devices

Application

     11.1     This clause applies to each life raft, life jacket and inflatable flotation device that, for the purpose of complying with civil aviation legislation, is:

(a)   installed or carried on an aircraft; or

(b)   to be installed or carried on an aircraft.

Testing

     11.2     The life raft, life jacket or inflatable flotation device must be inspected and tested in accordance with the manufacturer’s requirements.

Intervals

     11.3     Commencing from the date of manufacture, the life raft, life jacket or inflatable flotation device must be inspected and tested:

(a)   at the periodicity specified by the manufacturer; or

(b)   if the approved SOM or maintenance schedule specifies a lesser period — at that lesser period; or

(c)   if a period is not specified by the manufacturer and not provided within the approved SOM or maintenance schedule — after 2 years, and then at intervals not exceeding 12 months.

12        Towing release systems

Application

     12.1     This clause applies for an aircraft for the towing release system (if any).

Testing

     12.2     Before a towing operation commences on any day:

(a)   the cockpit control for the towing release system must be tested to ensure that it has full and free movement; and

(b)   each mechanism of the towing release system must be tested to ensure that it is clean and free from visible signs of damage or wear; and

(c)   the towing release system must be tested to establish that the release system functions correctly.

     12.3     The testing mentioned in subclause 12.2 may be undertaken on any day by the pilot in command of the aircraft, but if so, he or she must, for that day, certify for each test and its compliant outcome in column 2 of Part 3 of the maintenance release.

     12.4     Before a maintenance release may be issued for the aircraft for a day:

(a)   the hook mechanism of the towing release system must be properly cleaned and lubricated; and

(b)   all parts of the system, including levers, cables and pulleys, must be checked for wear and assessed for continuing airworthiness; and

(c)   the system mechanism must be able to return to a safe over-centre position with a return force, measured at the activating lever of the hook, of not less than 20N (Newton) (2 kg force).

Intervals

     12.5     The towing release assembly must be removed and overhauled in accordance with the manufacturer’s data and instructions, at intervals not exceeding whichever of the following happens first:

(a)   every 1 000 hours’ time-in-service;

(b)   every 12 months.

     12.6     For the overhaul mentioned in subclause 12.5, pilot effort must be tested to ensure that it is less than 200N (20 kg force) with a 4.5kN (450 kg force) load applied to the release anywhere in a 30 degree cone.

13        Electrical hoist assembly — earth bonding testing

Application

     13.1     This clause applies for an aircraft with an electrical hoist assembly that does not have specific bonding testing requirements.

Testing

     13.2     The electrical bonding between each adjacent component part of the electrical hoist assembly must be tested:

(a)   to a maximum resistance of 0.010 OHM; and

(b)   using a bonding tester capable of resolving to 0.002 OHM.

     13.3     For subclause 13.2, component parts of the electrical hoist assembly that must be considered adjacent to other parts include the control box, the electrical motor casing, the hoist body, the hoist arm and the attachment bracket.

Intervals

     13.4     Testing of the electrical hoist assembly must be carried out:

(a)   before it is installed in the aircraft; and

(b)   after it is installed in the aircraft — at intervals not exceeding every 24 months.

14        Periodic checking and testing of ATC transponders

Definition

     14.1     In this clause:

electron tube technology or ETT means technology that uses the physical and electrical characteristics of a physical body to oscillate and amplify a signal at its resonant frequency for subsequent broadcast, including through thermionic valves, klystrons or cavity oscillators.

Note 1   As the components age, the characteristics which provide the signal stability vary which affects the output signal.

Note 2   Transponders using ETT include, for example, Honeywell (Bendix-King) KT76A, Narco AT150 and ARC RT859.

Application

     14.2     This clause applies to all air traffic control (ATC) transponders.

Testing

     14.3     Before an ATC transponder is used for the first time in an aircraft, it must be system tested in accordance with the requirements of Appendix F of FAR 43, using Mode A code 2100.

     14.4     After the test mentioned in subclause 14.3, and within the intervals mentioned in subclause 14.7, each ATC transponder must be system tested in accordance with the requirements of Appendix F of FAR 43, using Mode A code 2100.

Note   Consideration should be given to aligning this test with that required under clauses 3, 4 and 5 of this Appendix 1.

     14.5     After the test mentioned in subclause 14.3, without affecting the requirements under subclause 14.4, and within the intervals mentioned in subclause 14.8, each ATC transponder using ETT must also be tested in accordance with the requirements of Appendix F of FAR 43, using Mode A code 2100, to confirm that:

(a)   the duration of all reply pulses (the pulse width) is at least 0.35, and not more than 0.55, microseconds; and

(b)   the amplitude variation between 1 reply pulse and any other reply pulse is not more than 1 dB.

     14.6     An ATC transponder which fails to comply with any requirement under subclause 14.3, 14.4 or 14.5, must not be used in an aircraft until it has been:

(a)   repaired or replaced in accordance with the requirements of CAR 1988 and CASR 1998; and

(b)   system tested in accordance with subclause 14.3 or 14.4, and tested in accordance with subclause 14.5 (if applicable).

Intervals

     14.7     For subclause 14.4, the interval is whichever of the following applies:

(a)   within 24 months after the ATC transponder was first system tested in accordance with subclause 14.3, and at intervals not exceeding every 24 months after that;

(b)   within 24 months after the date on which the same system test was last conducted under AD/Rad/47: Periodic Testing of ATC Transponders (as in force immediately before 22 December 2015), and at intervals not exceeding every 24 months after that;

(c)   the intervals in accordance with the approved SOM for the aircraft under regulation 42M of CAR 1988.

     14.8     For subclause 14.5, an ATC transponder using EET must be tested at the same time as the transponder is system tested in accordance with subclause 14.7.

Note    Generic guidance on the testing of transponders is available in AWB 34-013 and AWB 34-09.

15        Compressed gas cylinders

Application

     15.1     This clause applies for an aircraft (except a hot air balloon) which is installed with a compressed gas cylinder that:

(a)   is rechargeable; and

(b)   is not a fire extinguisher.

Testing

     15.2     The cylinder must be emptied before inspection and testing.

     15.3     Subject to subclause 15.4, the cylinder must:

(a)   be hydrostatically tested in accordance with subclauses 15.5 to 15.9; and

(b)   have its markings updated by an appropriately qualified holder of a certificate of approval under regulation 30 of CAR 1988, so that the markings conform to the manufacturer’s specification, the relevant Australian Standards, or the DOT specification.

     15.4     Paragraph 15.3 (a) does not apply to the following:

(a)   a cylinder with a working pressure of less than 1 MPa;

(b)   a cylinder, manufactured in the USA, with an outside diameter of less than 51 mm and a length of less than 610 mm.

     15.5     Testing of the cylinder must include testing by interior hydrostatic pressure in a water jacket or other apparatus suitable to determine the expansion of the cylinder.

     15.6     For subclause 15.5, permanent volumetric expansion of the cylinder must not exceed:

(a)   10% of total volumetric expansion at test pressure; or

(b)   more than 1/5000th of the cylinder’s original volume.

     15.7     If a cylinder’s specifications do not adequately define damage limits, 50% of the damage tolerances stated in Australian Standard AS2030 must be applied.

     15.8     A cylinder manufactured in the USA and marked 3HT must be inspected and tested in accordance with the USA Compressed Gas Association Pamphlet C-8.

Note   See FAR 49 180.209 (k) and FAR 180.213 (c).

     15.9     A hydrostatic proof test of a cylinder is an acceptable alternative to a hydrostatic stretch test only if the hydrostatic proof test is permitted by the cylinder’s specification.

   15.10     Inspection of a cylinder must include the following:

(a)   visual internal inspection;

(b)   visual external inspection.

   15.11     Subject to subclauses 15.12 and 15.13, inspection and testing of cylinders under this clause must be carried out at intervals not exceeding every 5 years after manufacture.

   15.12     For 3HT cylinders, inspection and testing under this clause must be carried out at intervals not exceeding every 3 years after manufacture.

   15.13     For DOT-E type cylinders, inspection and testing under this subclause must be carried out:

(a)   at the intervals mentioned in the latest revision of the applicable DOT Special Permit; or

(b)   at intervals not exceeding every 3 years after manufacture.

   15.14     For the cylinder valve and regulator, inspection and testing under this subclause must be in accordance with the following:

(a)   the manufacturer’s specifications; or

(b)   if there are no manufacturer’s specifications — in accordance with Australian Standard AS2337.1-2004, paragraph 10.2.2.

Intervals

   15.15     Inspection and testing of the cylinder valve and regulator under this clause must be carried out:

(a)   in accordance with the intervals specified by the manufacturer; and

(b)   concurrently with a cylinder inspection.

Unfitness and retirement

   15.16     A rechargeable cylinder must be retired from service not later than as follows:

(a)   in accordance with the manufacturer’s specification; or

(b)   for a 3HT cylinder:

             (i)  after 4 380 pressurisations (cycles); or

            (ii)  24 years after its date of manufacture; or

(c)   for a HOLASW 1** cylinder:

             (i)  after 5 000 pressurisations (cycles); or

            (ii)  25 years after its date of manufacture;

(d)   for a fibre-wrapped cylinder:

             (i)  at the limit specified in the applicable DOT-Exemption; or

            (ii)  15 years after its date of manufacture.

15.17     Cylinders that no longer comply with inspection limits or test requirements must be rendered unfit for further use in accordance with AS 2030.

16        Combustion type cabin heaters

Application

     16.1     This clause applies for an aircraft which is installed with a combustion type heater (the heater) unless the heater is one to which AD/AIRCON/12 (as in force from time to time) applies.

Note   AD/AIRCON/12 applies to Kelly Aerospace Power Systems (formerly Janaero Devices) B Series combustion heaters, Models B1500, B2030, B2500, B3040, B3500, B4050 and B4500 marked as meeting the standards of FAA TSO-C20.

     16.2     The heater must be inspected, overhauled, function-tested and disabled in accordance with this clause.

Inspection

     16.3     The heater installation must be inspected for general condition and security, along with any airframe-mounted components necessary for the heater’s operation.

     16.4     The hot air outlet ducting adjacent to the heater must be inspected for freedom from exhaust contamination and corrosion.

`    16.5     The heater fuel filter must be cleaned, and the fuel system must be inspected for loose connections and leaks using system pressure.

     16.6     The heater drain lines must be inspected for freedom from obstructions.

     16.7     Spark plugs and contact breaker points for the heater must be inspected, and adjusted where necessary.

     16.8     The inspections mentioned in subclauses 16.3 to 16.7 must be carried out at intervals after manufacture not exceeding whichever of the following happens first:

(a)   every 100 heater hours;

(b)   every 24 months.

Functional test

     16.9     A functional test of the heater must be carried out.

     16.10   During the functional test, carbon monoxide (CO) levels in the heated air entering the aircraft cabin must be measured, using quantitative CO measurement, to confirm that the CO entering cabin is at a level less than 1 part per 20 000 parts of air.

     16.11   If the heater fails the test mentioned in subclause 16.9, before the next flight of the aircraft, the heater must be disabled in accordance with this clause, or repaired, or replaced.

     16.12   The functional test mentioned in subclause 16.9 must be carried out at intervals after manufacture not exceeding whichever of the following happens first:

(a)   every 100 heater hours;

(b)   every 24 months.

Disabling heater

     16.13   The heater may only be disabled in accordance with the following requirements:

(a)   for a heater covered by a minimum equipment list (a MEL) — in accordance with the MEL;

(b)   for a heater not covered by a MEL — in accordance with both an approval for permissible unserviceabilities, and compliance with the following instructions:

             (i)  cap the fuel supply line;

            (ii)  disconnect the electrical power and ensure that the connections are properly secured to reduce the possibility of electrical spark or structural damage;

           (iii)  inspect and test the cabin heater system to ensure that the heater is disabled and that the cabin fans are operative;

           (iv)  check to ensure that no other aircraft system is affected by any of the steps taken under subparagraphs (i) to (iii);

            (v)  ensure that there are no fuel leaks as a result of any of the steps taken under subparagraphs (i) to (iii), or otherwise;

           (vi)  fabricate a placard displaying the words: “Heater System Inoperative” and install the placard at the heater control valve within clear view of the pilot.

Note   Permanent deactivation of the heater requires use of approved modification data. Use of approved modification data, internal inspection and functional tests are required before return to service.

Overhaul and intervals

   16.14     Overhaul of the heater must be carried out in accordance with the heater manufacturer’s recommendations, including as to time between overall.

   16.15     Unless the heater manufacturer has recommended otherwise, overhaul of the heater must be carried out at intervals not exceeding whichever of the following happens first:

(a)   every 500 heater hours since last overhaul;

(b)   every 8 years since last overhaul.

17        Fire protection in toilet areas

Application

     17.1     This clause applies to an aeroplane:

(a)   for which the initial Australian certificate of airworthiness for the type was issued after 1 January 1958 in the Transport Category; and

(b)   that has 1 or more toilets equipped with receptacles for paper waste or used linen (a receptacle).

Testing and repair of receptacles for paper waste or used linen

     17.2     The aeroplane operator (the operator) must ensure that, before a receptacle is used for the first time on the aeroplane it is inspected and tested in accordance with subclause 17.3.

     17.3     Within the intervals mentioned in subclause 17.5, the operator must ensure that the door, lid, flap or other device giving access to the inside of the receptacle (whether for depositing or removing waste or linen) is inspected and tested so that its proper operation, fit, sealing, and latching or locking will contain a possible fire within the receptacle.

     17.4     The operator must ensure that a receptacle which fails an inspection and test under subclause 17.3 must not be used until it has been:

(a)   repaired or replaced; and

(b)   inspected in accordance with subclause 17.3.

Intervals

     17.5     For subclause 17.3, the inspection and testing of each receptacle must be conducted at whichever of the following intervals is least restrictive:

(a)   at intervals not exceeding every 1 000 hours after it was last inspected and tested in accordance with subclause 17.2; or

(b)   within 100 hours of 22 December 2015, and at intervals not exceeding every 1 000 hours after that.

18        ADF systems — periodic checking

Application

     18.1     This clause applies only for the ADF navigation systems of an Australian aircraft for which the holder of the certificate of registration has elected to use the CASA maintenance schedule.

Note   The CASA maintenance schedule is set out in Schedule 5 — CASA maintenance schedule, of CAR 1988.

Checks — quadrantal errors

     18.2     Each ADF navigation system must be checked for accuracy and correct performance in all modes of operation for quadrantal errors.

     18.3     The following must be done:

(a)   apply corrections for any quadrantal errors detected;

(b)   after the application of corrections for any quadrantal errors, ensure that the maximum permissible residual error mentioned in a row of column 3 of the following table, for an operational classification and check mentioned in columns 1 and 2 of the same row, are not exceeded.

Operational classification

Checks required at (in degrees):

Maximum permissible error

V.F.R.

0° and 180°

±

Night V.M.C.

0° and 180°

±

Maximum quadrantal error points

±10°

I.F.R.

0° and ± 15°; and

180° and ± 15°

±

Any other bearing

±

Note   In the case of V.F.R. and night V.M.C. aircraft only, where the ADF equipment has no means of applying quadrantal error correction, or where the error exceeds the capability of the correcting mechanism, the errors may be placarded adjacent to the ADF system’s indicator or display.

Checks — dual ADF systems

     18.4     Where there are any dual ADF systems — check and ensure that each system does not interfere with the operation of the other system.

Intervals

     18.5     The checks mentioned in this clause must be carried out each time a periodic inspection is carried out in accordance with paragraphs 2.4 and 2.5 in Part 2 of Schedule 5 of CAR 1988.

19        VOR systems — periodic checking

Application

     19.1     This clause applies only for the following navigation systems (the relevant systems) of an Australian aircraft for which the holder of the certificate of registration has elected to use the CASA maintenance schedule:

(a)   all VOR systems;

(b)   all localiser systems;

(c)   all glideslope systems.

Note   The CASA maintenance schedule is set out in Schedule 5 — CASA maintenance schedule, of CAR 1988.

Checks

     19.2     Check and ensure that the level of interference between the relevant systems, and any combination of other aircraft systems normally operated in flight, is not of a level sufficient to cause either of the following:

(a)   a significant deflection of the flight path indicator when the flag is concealed;

(b)   any degradation of the readability of the station identification.

     19.3     For subclause 19.2, a level of interference which is merely intermittent or short-term may be ignored, but only if it does not cause the deflection or degradation mentioned in paragraphs 19.2 (a) and (b).

     19.4     Check and ensure that the level of interference from any source, intermittent, short‑term or otherwise, is not of a level sufficient to cause the flag to indicate usability in the absence of a usable signal.

Intervals

     19.5     The checks mentioned in this clause must be carried out each time a periodic inspection is carried out in accordance with paragraphs 2.4 and 2.5 in Part 2 of Schedule 5 of CAR 1988.

20        VOR in I.F.R. — periodic checking

Application

     20.1     This clause applies only for the following navigation system of an Australian aircraft for which the holder of the certificate of registration has elected to use the CASA maintenance schedule: a VOR system installed in an aircraft equipped for flight under the I.F.R.

Note   The CASA maintenance schedule is set out in Schedule 5 — CASA maintenance schedule, of CAR 1988.

Checks

     20.2     Check and ensure that each of the following requirements is the case:

(a)   based on tests made on a representative number of radials, the deviation indicator must centre when the omni bearing selector (OBS) is within 3 degrees of the selected radial;

(b)   the deflection sensitivity must be such that a 5 dot left and a 5 dot right deflection must be obtained when the OBS is varied 10 degrees ± 2 degrees from the on‑course setting, and the indications must be of the correct sense;

(c)   where installed, the radio magnetic indicator (RMI) reading must be within 4 degrees of the selected radial;

(d)   the TO-FROM indicator must continue to show TO or FROM as originally selected when the OBS is rotated by ± 45 degrees from the selected radial;

(e)   the flag must remain concealed during each of the tests mentioned in paragraphs (a) to (d), however, when the signal input level is reduced so as to cause the deviation indicator deflection to fall by 2 dots, the flag must be at least partly visible.

Note 1   A simulator may be used for the checking mentioned in paragraphs 20.2 (a) to (e).

Note 2   The sensitivities referred to in this subclause are related to a “standard” 5 dot-0-5 dot, 150 microamperes-0-150 microamperes indicator. Proportional deflections apply to other than “standard” indicators.

Intervals

     20.3     The checks mentioned in this clause must be carried out each time a periodic inspection is carried out in accordance with paragraphs 2.4 and 2.5 in Part 2 of Schedule 5 of CAR 1988.

21        Glidescope in I.F.R. — periodic checking

Application

     21.1     This clause applies only for the following navigation system of an Australian aircraft for which the holder of the certificate of registration has elected to use the CASA maintenance schedule: a glidescope system installed in an I.F.R. aircraft.

Note   The CASA maintenance schedule is set out in Schedule 5 — CASA maintenance schedule, of CAR 1988.

Checks

     21.2     Check and ensure that each of the following requirements is the case:

(a)   the deviation indicator must centre within less than ½ (± 12 microamperes) when the tone ratio is 0 dB (ddm = 0);

(b)   the sensitivity must be such that the deviation indicator deflection is 4.3 dots ± 0.7 dots (110 to 150 microamperes) for both up and down deflections when using a signal with 3.3 dB tone ratios or 2.7 dots ± 0.3 dot (68 to 93 microamperes), when using a 2 dB tone ratio, and the deflection must be in the correct sense;

(c)   the flag must remain concealed during each of the tests mentioned in paragraphs (a) and (b), however, when the signal input level is reduced so as to cause the deviation indicator deflection to fall by 2 dots, the flag must be at least partly visible.

Note 1   A simulator may be used for the checking mentioned in paragraphs 21.2 (a) to (c).

Note 2   The sensitivities referred to in this subclause are related to a “standard” 5 dot-0-5 dot, 150 microamperes-0-150 microamperes indicator. Proportional deflections apply to other than “standard” indicators.

Intervals

     21.3     The checks mentioned in this clause must be carried out each time a periodic inspection is carried out in accordance with paragraphs 2.4 and 2.5 in Part 2 of Schedule 5 of CAR 1988.

Attachment 1 to Appendix 1

                                                                                                                                    Note   See subclauses 3.3, 4.2 and 4.6 in Appendix 1.

 

Testing procedures for:

                                        Pitot-static systems

                                        Pressure altimeter systems

                                        Air data computers

                                        Automatic pressure altitude encoders

                                        Other transponder devices

 

Clause 1        Pitot-static system test

        (1)     Static pressure systems

                 Performance of the test procedures set out below, with all static instruments connected, must ensure that any leakage present is within the tolerance specified for the procedure.

(a)   Visually inspect the ports, plumbing, accessories and instruments connected to the static system. Repair or replace those parts which are defective, for example, broken “B” nuts, cracked flare sleeves, deteriorated flexible tubing and quick disconnects, bad valves etc. If purging is necessary, use compressed air or nitrogen to remove foreign matter which may have accumulated in the tubing. Ensure that all static instruments are disconnected before commencing to purge.

(b)   Ensure that no alterations or deformations of the airframe surface are present that would affect static air sensing. This is of particular importance for RVSM aircraft.

(c)   Check any static port heaters to assure proper operation.

(d)   If an aircraft has more than 1 static system, test each system separately to assure its independence and that the leak rate for each system is within tolerance.

(e)   Connect the test equipment directly to the static ports, if practicable. If not practicable, connect to a static system drain or tee connection and seal off the static ports. If the test equipment is connected to the static system at any point other than the static port, it must be made at a point where the connection may be readily inspected for system integrity after the system is returned to its normal configuration.

(f)    Determine that any leakage is within the tolerances mentioned in paragraph (g) or (h) (as the case requires).

(g)   For unpressurised airplanes — evacuate the static pressure system to a pressure differential of approximately 33 hPa or to a reading on the altimeter that is 1 000 feet above the aircraft’s elevation at the time of the test. Without additional pumping for a period of 1 minute, the loss of indicated altitude must not exceed 100 feet on the altimeter.

(h)   For pressurised airplanes — evacuate the static pressure system until a pressure differential equivalent to the maximum cabin pressure differential for which the airplane is type certificated is achieved. Without additional pumping for a period of 1 minute, the loss of indicated altitude must not exceed 2 per cent of the equivalent altitude of the maximum cabin differential pressure or 100 feet, whichever is greater.

(i)    On completion of the static pressure system test, ensure that all static port seals are removed.

        (2)     Pitot-systems

(a)   The pitot system is tested for leaks by applying a pressure at the pitot head sufficient to cause the airspeed indicator to read 120 knots, or the maximum indicated speed, whichever is the greater.

(b)   There must be no discernible lag in the movement of the airspeed indicator pointer with the application of the pressure, as such a lag indicates restrictions in the piping.

(c)   There must be no decrease in the reading when the system is sealed for at least 10 seconds.

Clause 2        Tests for altimeters and air data computers

Note   For testing of air data computers, see subclause 2 (8) below.

        (1)     Environmental conditions test

(a)   Vibration (intended to minimise the effects of friction). If suitable test equipment is available, each test for performance may be conducted with the instrument installed in the aircraft. If suitable test equipment for an installed test is not available, or if the instrument fails the installed test, the instrument must be removed from the aircraft and tested or retested with vibration applied.

(b)   Temperature. When tests are conducted with the temperature substantially different from ambient temperature of approximately 25°C, allowance must be made for that temperature difference.

        (2)     Scale error test

(a)   With the barometric pressure scale at 1 013 hPa, the altimeter must be successively subjected to pressures corresponding to the altitude specified in Table 1 up to the maximum, normally expected, operating altitude of the aircraft in which the altimeter is, or is to be, installed.

(b)   The reduction in pressure must be made at a rate not in excess of 20 000 feet per minute to within approximately 2 000 feet of the test point.

(c)   The test point must be approached at a rate compatible with the test equipment.

(d)   The altimeter must be kept at the pressure corresponding to each test point for at least 1 minute, but not more than 10 minutes, before a reading is taken.

(e)   The error at all test points must not exceed the tolerances specified in Table 1.

Table 1         Scale error

Altitude

Equivalent pressure

Tolerance

Hectopascals

± (feet)

-1 000

1050

20

0

1013

20

500

995

20

1 000

977

20

1 500

960

25

2 000

942

30

3 000

908

30

4 000

875

35

6 000

812

40

8 000

753

60

10 000

697

80

12 000

644

90

14 000

595

100

16 000

549

110

18 000

506

120

20 000

466

130

22 000

428

140

25 000

376

155

30 000

301

180

35 000

238

205

40 000

188

230

45 000

147

255

50 000

116

280

        (3)     Hysteresis test

(a)   The hysteresis test must begin within 15 minutes of the altimeter’s initial exposure to the pressure corresponding to the upper limit of the scale error test in subclause (2). While the altimeter is at this pressure, the hysteresis test is to commence.

(b)   Pressure must be increased at a rate simulating a descent in altitude at the rate of 5 000 to 20 000 feet per minute until within 3 000 feet of the first test point (50 per cent of maximum altitude).

(c)   The test point is then to be approached at a rate of approximately 3 000 feet per minute. The altimeter must be kept at this pressure for at least 5 minutes, but not more than 15 minutes, before the test reading is taken.

(d)   After the reading has been taken, the pressure must be increased further, in the same manner as before, until the pressure corresponding to the second test point (40 per cent of maximum altitude) is reached. The altimeter must be kept at this pressure for at least 1 minute, but not more than 10 minutes, before the test reading is taken.

(e)   After the reading has been taken, the pressure must be increased further, in the same manner as before, until atmospheric pressure is reached.

(f)    The reading of the altimeter at either of the 2 test points must not differ by more than the tolerance specified in Table 2 in subclause 2 (4) from the reading of the altimeter for the corresponding altitude recorded during the scale error test prescribed in subclause (2).

        (4)     After effect test

                 Within 5 minutes following the completion of the hysteresis test set out in subclause (3), the reading of the altimeter (corrected for any change in atmospheric pressure) must not differ from the original atmospheric pressure reading by more than the tolerance specified in Table 2.

Table 2         Test tolerances

Test

Tolerance (feet)

Case leak test

±100

Hysteresis test:

 

First test point (50 per cent of maximum altitude)

75

Second test point (40 per cent of maximum altitude)

75

After effect test

30

        (5)     Friction test

(a)   The altimeter is to be subjected to a steady rate of decrease of pressure approximating 750 feet per minute.

(b)   At each altitude listed in Table 3, the change in reading of the pointers after vibration (using a light tapping of the instrument panel adjacent to the altimeter if the altimeter does not have an integral vibrator) must not exceed the corresponding tolerance listed in Table 3.

(c)   If the altimeter fails the friction test while installed on the aircraft, the altimeter must be removed and retested.

Table 3         Friction

Altitude (feet)

Tolerance
(feet)

1 000 -

±70

2 000 -

70

3 000

70

5 000

70

10 000

80

15 000

90

20 000

100

25 000

120

30 000

140

35 000

160

40 000

180

50 000

250

        (6)     Case leak test

                 The leakage of the altimeter case, when the pressure within it corresponds to an altitude of 18 000 feet, must not change the altimeter reading by more than the tolerance shown in Table 2 in subclause 2 (4) during an interval of 1 minute.

        (7)     Barometric scale error test

                 At constant atmospheric pressure, the barometric pressure scale must be set at each of the pressures (falling within its range of adjustment) that are listed in Table 4, and this must cause the pointer to indicate the equivalent altitude difference shown in Table 4 within a tolerance of plus or minus 25 feet.

Table 4         Pressure-altitude difference

Pressure
(hectopascal)

Altitude difference
(feet)

952

-1 727

965

-1 340

982

-863

999

-392

1013

0

1033

+531

1046

+893

1049

+974

        (8)     Air data computers test

(a)   The tests set out in subclauses (1) to (7) do not apply for air data computers or for systems similar to air data computers (a similar type).

(b)   Paragraph (c) sets out the tests for the following altimeters:

             (i)  an altimeter that is an air data computer or similar type with associated computing systems;

            (ii)  an altimeter that incorporates air data correction internally.

(c)   An altimeter mentioned in paragraph (b), must be tested as follows:

             (i)  in the manner, and to the specifications, provided by the manufacturer of the equipment or aircraft in which the altimeter is installed;

            (ii)  in accordance with the instructions for continuing airworthiness incorporated in a modification approval for the equipment or aircraft in which the altimeter is installed.

Clause 3        Automatic pressure altitude encoders and ATC transponder system integration test

                 Automatic pressure altitude encoder test and other transponder devices

                 Measure the automatic pressure altitude value at the output of the installed ATC transponder when interrogated on Mode C at a sufficient number of test points to ensure that the altitude reporting equipment, altimeters, and ATC transponders perform their intended functions as installed in the aircraft. The difference between the automatic reporting output and the altitude displayed at each altimeter must not exceed 125 feet.


 

Appendix 2

Approved single engine turbine-powered aeroplanes (ASETPA)

Note   See Part 1 and Part 2 of this 2-Part Appendix.

Part 1      Compliance requirements

Note 1   See paragraph 10.1 of this CAO.

Note 2   The aeroplane must comply with each of the following requirements and be approved by CASA. (See subsection 10 above.) Aircraft systems and equipment mentioned within these requirements must be approved under regulation 21.305 of CASR 1998.

1          Aeroplane

                 The aeroplane type must have been originally certificated as a turbine-powered aeroplane under the certification requirements set under Part 23 of CASR 1998 that are equivalent to FAR 23 amendment 28 or a subsequent amendment.

Note   Thus, a turbine conversion of an originally certificated piston-powered aeroplane cannot comply.

2          Engine

       2.1     The aeroplane engine type (the engine type) must have documented evidence of an acceptable world fleet reliability rate (WFRR) in accordance with this clause.

       2.2     The WFRR must be calculated as a 6 month rolling average, and consist of:

(a)   an in-flight shutdown (IFSD) rate of not more than 0.01 per 1 000 hours based on a minimum experience history of 100 000 hours’ time-in-service; or

(b)   an IFSD rate for individual engine components gained in the same engine types, or in equivalent engine types as determined by CASA, that collectively meet the standard of paragraph 2.2 (b).

       2.3     For paragraphs 2.2 (a) and (b), where the accumulated history is less than the requirement, the history of individual components which have demonstrated time in service in similar engine types, may be taken into account.

3          Engine control system

       3.1     The engine control system must meet the requirements of FAR 23.1141 Amendment 29 or a later amendment.

       3.2     If use of an emergency/secondary power lever is available, the necessary procedures for its use must be documented in the Aircraft Flight Manual (AFM) or approved equivalent.

4          Engine ignition system

                 The aeroplane type must be equipped with 1 of the following engine ignition systems:

(a)   an automatic ignition system which activates in the event of a loss of an engine parameter, for example, engine speed, turbine temperature or engine torque;

(b)   an ignition system which can be selected “ON” and has a duty cycle greater than 1 hour.

5          Engine fire warning system

                 The aeroplane type must be equipped with an engine compartment fire detection and in-flight warning system.

6          Engine monitoring system

       6.1     The aeroplane type must be equipped with an automatically activated electronic engine trend monitoring recording system, approved by or under Part 21 of CASR 1998, which records the following:

(a)   engine parameters referenced in the engine manufacturer’s published engine trend monitoring procedures; and

(b)   any other engine performance parameters, mentioned in the approval, that are critical to the engine’s safe continuing airworthiness.

       6.2     The engine oil consumption must be monitored in accordance with the engine manufacturer’s recommendations.

       6.3     Any anomalies detected by the monitoring mentioned in subclause 6.1 or 6.2 must be checked against the manufacturer’s data to determine appropriate and timely corrective action.

7          Engine oil metal contamination detection system

                 The aeroplane must be equipped with an approved electronic engine oil metal contamination detection system which provides the pilot with an in-flight, visual, caution/warning indication of possible contamination of the engine oil, including as applicable the following:

(a)   engine reduction gearbox oil system;

(b)   engine accessory gearbox oil system.

8          Electrical power sources

                 The aeroplane must be equipped with the following:

(a)   a primary electrical generator and 1 or more primary electrical storage batteries;

(b)   an alternative source of electrical power, capable of supplying sufficient continuous power to each of the following:

             (i)  flight instruments;

            (ii)  navigation systems;

           (iii)  lighting systems;

           (iv)  icing protection systems;

(c)   any other aeroplane system required under CAO 20.18 for the endurance of the aeroplane for flight at night under the I.F.R.

9          Battery capacity

       9.1     There must be an electrical load analysis (ELA) for the aeroplane.

Note   The ELA is provided to CASA at the time of an application for ASETPA approval.

       9.2     The ELA is to certify that the electrical storage capacity of the aeroplane’s prime battery is capable of providing the following:

(a)   full operation of essential flight and navigation instruments, lighting and associated icing protection systems during an engine failed glide from the maximum operating altitude, or an elected limiting altitude, to sea level at best range glide speed;

(b)   sufficient capacity remaining during a glide mentioned in paragraph (a) to conduct 2 engine start attempts, and lower the flaps and undercarriage.

       9.3     The requirement for sufficient battery capacity for the 2 engine starts mentioned in paragraph 9.2 (b) may be reduced to capacity for 1 engine start, provided:

(a)   the aeroplane’s engine fuel feed system from the aeroplane’s fuel tank to the engine fuel control unit is automatic; and

(b)   the engine compressor air intake incorporates continuous anti-icing while the engine is operating; and

(c)   the aeroplane incorporates an automatic engine ignition system which activates in the event of a loss of an engine parameter such as engine speed, turbine temperature or engine torque.

       9.4     Where the aircraft avionics and electrical configuration:

(a)   differs from the approved configuration; or

(b)   is altered after approval of the configuration;

                 a revised ELA must be provided to CASA for approval.

10        Electrical load shedding

     10.1     Subject to subclause 10.2, the AFM or approved equivalent must provide the pilot with a procedure for shedding non-essential electrical systems during a maximum range glide descent following an engine failure in flight.

     10.2     In the case of an automatic shedding procedure that will commence to operate following an engine failure in flight, the AFM or an approved equivalent is not required to include a procedure in accordance with subclause 10.1 but must state, for the information of the pilot, how the automatic shedding procedure will operate.

11          Flight instrument systems

     11.1     The aeroplane must be equipped with flight and navigation instruments and instrument power sources complying with the regulatory requirements for air transport I.F.R. operations.

     11.2     Aeroplanes incorporating an electronic display flight instrument system must incorporate secondary attitude and gyroscopic heading instruments located on the pilot’s flight instrument panel and powered independently of the primary flight display.

     11.3     In aeroplanes approved for flight in icing conditions, the AFM or approved equivalent must provide the pilot with a procedure for ensuring essential flight instruments are protected from icing during a maximum range glide descent through icing conditions following an engine failure in flight.

12          Autopilot system

                 For single pilot operations, the aeroplane must be equipped with an automatic pilot providing a capability to:

(a)   operate the flight controls to maintain flight and manoeuvre the aeroplane about the roll and pitch axis; and

(b)   fly to an automatic heading; and

(c)   provide altitude hold.

13          Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)

                 The aeroplane must be equipped with GNSS in accordance with CASA’s instructions issued under:

(a)   subregulation 174A (1) of CAR 1988 — for V.F.R. flights; or

(b)   subregulation 177 (1) of CAR 1988 — for I.F.R. flights.

Note   Instructions are generally in CAOs.

14          Radar altimeter

                 The aeroplane must be equipped with a radar altimeter.

15          Weather radar

                 The aeroplane must be equipped with a weather radar system.

16          Passenger seats

     16.1     The aeroplane must be equipped with passenger seats identified by:

(a)   the part number or model number meeting the requirements of FAR 23.562 and 23.785 to amendment 36 or later amendment; or

(b)   for Cessna 208 and 208B aircraft — the following part numbers:

             (i)  2614028-();

            (ii)  2614029-();

           (iii)  2614076-();

           (iv)  2614077-();

            (v)  2619019-();

           (vi)  2619020-().

Note   For Cessna 208 and 208B, 2 or 3 place Rear Bench Seats (2614045-() or 2619017-(), IPC Ref  25-21-01), Stowable Seats (2614041-(), ATFS1-01, IPC Ref. 25-21-02) and non-factory seats not meeting FAR 23.562 (AMDT. 23-36), TSO-C127 or TSO-C127a, are not approved for ASETPA operations.

     16.2     Each passenger seat must be equipped with a shoulder harness.

Part 2      Operator and aircraft maintenance organisation requirements

Note   See paragraph 10.2 of this CAO.

1          Training

            The operator or maintenance organisation must provide maintenance personnel with training on the concept and safety of ASETPA operations and the importance of conducting maintenance to the appropriate ASETPA standards.

2          Maintenance System

       2.1     The aeroplane and engine must be maintained in accordance with:

(a)   a SOM, or a maintenance schedule, under regulation 39, 42A or 42C of CAR 1988; or

(b)   if Part 42 of CASR 1998 applies to the aircraft — an approved maintenance program.

       2.2     The SOM or schedule must have provision for a pre-departure ASETPA check inclusive of, but not limited to, the following items:

(a)   aircraft fluid system reservoirs;

(b)   navigation databases;

(c)   battery capacity.

       2.3     The SOM or schedule must have provision for the following:

(a)   battery capacity test every 100 days or in accordance with the SOM or schedule, whichever is the most exacting;

(b)   following the installation of a new, leased or repaired engine — an engine validation period before the airframe/engine combination enters ASETPA operations;

(c)   an event-based reliability program covering the engine and associated equipment relevant to night and I.F.R. operations.

Notes to Civil Aviation Order 100.5 (General requirements in respect of maintenance of Australian aircraft) 2011

Note 1

The Civil Aviation Order (in force under the Civil Aviation Regulations 1988) as shown in this compilation comprises Civil Aviation Order 100.5 amended as indicated in the Tables below.

Table of Orders

Year and
number

Date of notification
in Gazette/
registration on FRLI

Date of
commencement

Application, saving or
transitional provisions

CAO 2004 No. R83

23 December 2004

23 December 2004 (s. 2)

 

CAO 100.5 2008 No. 1

FRLI 27 March 2008 (F2008L00598)

28 March 2008 (s. 2)

 

CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

FRLI 22 June 2011 (F2011L01193)

27 June 2011 (s. 2)

 

CAO 100.5 2012 No. 1

FRLI 6 February 2012 (F2012L00171)

7 February 2012 (s. 2 and Gazette 2012, No. S14)

 

CAO 100.5 2012 No. 2

FRLI 6 February 2012 (F2012L00175)

7 February 2012 (s. 2 and Gazette 2012, No. S15)

 

CAO 100.5 2012 No. 3

FRLI 14 September 2012 (F2012L01872)

15 September 2012 (s. 2)

 

CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1

   as amended by

FRLI 8 July 2013 (F2013L01330)

 

1 August 2013 (s. 2 and Gazette notice C2013G01042)

 

CAO 100.5 2013 No. 2

FRLI 31 July 2013 (F2013L01486)

1 August 2013, immediately before the commencement of CAO 100.5 Amdt. Instrument 2013 (No. 1) (s. 2 and Gazette notice C2013G01180)

 

CAO 100.5 2013 No. 3

FRLI 10 December 2013 (F2013L02068)

10 December 2013 (s. 2)

 

CAO (Flight Crew Licensing) Repeal and Amendment Instrument 2014 (No. 1)

29 August 2014
(
F2014L01177)

1 September 2014 (s. 2)

Sections 3 and 31 (Table A)

CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

FRLI 22 December 2015
(F2015L02102)

22 December 2016 (s. 2)

 

 


Table of Amendments

ad. = added or inserted     am. = amended     rep. = repealed     rs.= repealed and substituted

Provision affected

How affected

s. 100.5...................................

rs. CAO 2004 No. R83

s. 1...........................................

rep. CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

s. 1A........................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

s. 2
(renumbered s. 1B)..........


CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

s. 3 ..........................................

rep. CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

Schedule heading................

rep. CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

CAO title.................................

rep. CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1

subs. 1....................................

am. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1

subs. 2....................................

am. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

subs. 2A..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

subs. 3....................................

am. CAO 100.5 2012 No. 3

subs. 4....................................

rs. CAO 100.5 2012 No. 3

subs. 7....................................

am. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

subs. 7A..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2011 No. 1
rs. CAO 100.5 2012 No. 1

subs. 8....................................

am. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 3

subs. 8A..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2012 No. 2

subs. 9....................................

am. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1 (as rs. by CAO 100.5 2013 No. 2)

subs. 9A..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2008 No. 1
am. CAO (Flight Crew Licensing) Repeal and Amendment Instrument 2014 (No. 1)

subs. 10..................................

rs. CAO 100.5 2012 No. 3; CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

subs. 11..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1
am. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

subs. 12..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1 (as am. by CAO 100.5 2013 No. 2)

subs. 13..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

subs. 14..................................

ad. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

Appendix 1.............................

ad. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1
am. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

Attachment 1 to Appendix 1

ad. CAO 100.5 2013 No. 1

Appendix 2.............................

ad. CAO 100.5 2015 No. 1

 

Table A          Application, saving or transitional provisions

 

Sections 3 and 31 of Civil Aviation Order (Flight Crew Licensing) Repeal and Amendment Instrument 2014 (No. 1) read as follows:

 

3          Definitions

        (1)     In this instrument:

continued authorisation has the meaning given by regulation 202.261 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998 (CASR 1998).

new authorisation has the meaning given by regulation 202.261 of CASR 1998.

        (2)     A reference in this instrument to a Civil Aviation Order identified by a specified number is taken to include a reference to the section of the Civil Aviation Orders with that number.

Note   Some existing legislative instruments are referred to as a Civil Aviation Order followed by a number. Other instruments are referred to as a section of the Civil Aviation Orders. For consistency, in this instrument, all such instruments are referred to as a Civil Aviation Order followed by a number. For example, a reference to Civil Aviation Order 40.2.2 is taken to include a reference to section 40.2.2 of the Civil Aviation Orders.

31        Transitional — application of Civil Aviation Orders

                 The Civil Aviation Orders apply to a continued authorisation as if it were the equivalent new authorisation.