Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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SLI 2015 No. 11 Regulations as made
This regulation amends the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Regulations 2001 to set the 2015 Renewable Power Percentage and 2015 Small-scale Technology Percentage.
Administered by: Environment
Registered 27 Feb 2015
Tabling HistoryDate
Tabled HR03-Mar-2015
Tabled Senate03-Mar-2015
Date of repeal 01 Mar 2015
Repealed by Division 1 of Part 5A of the Legislative Instruments Act 2003

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

SELECT LEGISLATIVE INSTRUMENT NO. 11, 2015

 

 

Issued by authority of the Minister for the Environment

 

Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act 2000

 

Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment (Percentages) Regulation 2015

 

Section 161 of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act 2000 (the Act) provides that the
Governor-General may make regulations prescribing all matters required or permitted by the Act to be prescribed, or necessary or convenient to be prescribed for carrying out or giving effect to the Act.

 

The Act, as established, provides the framework for the implementation of the Government’s Mandatory Renewable Energy Target (MRET) announced in 1997. The objective of the Act is to encourage the additional generation of electricity from renewable sources.

 

The Act has been amended several times. From 1 January 2011 the RET split into the large-scale renewable energy target (LRET) and small-scale renewable energy scheme (SRES). Both schemes establish a certificate market in their own right.

 

Under the Act, wholesale purchasers of electricity (the ‘liable entities’) are required to meet a share of the LRET and SRES in proportion to their share of the national wholesale electricity market.  The Act provides for the creation of large-scale generation certificates (LGCs) from accredited renewable energy power stations and the creation of small-scale technology certificates (STCs) from eligible solar water heaters and small generation unit installations. 

 

The purpose of the Regulation is to amend the Principal Regulations to specify the LRET Renewable Power Percentage (RPP) for 2015 and to specify the SRES Small-scale Technology Percentage (STP) for 2015.

 

The Regulation specifies the RPP for 2015, which when used in a set formula calculates the number of LGCs that liable entities have to surrender to the Clean Energy Regulator to avoid a shortfall charge. The RPP for 2015 is 11.11 per cent, increasing from 9.87 per cent in 2014. 

 

Subsection 39(1) of the Act provides that the RPP for a given year must be specified in the regulations on or before 31 March in that year. The Minister must take into consideration several items under Subsection 39(3) of the Act before the Governor General makes the regulation under Subsection 39(1).

 

The Regulation also specifies the STP for 2015, which when used in a set formula calculates the number of STCs that liable entities have to surrender quarterly to the Clean Energy Regulator to avoid a shortfall charge.  The STP for 2015 is 11.71 per cent, increasing from 10.48 per cent in 2014. The STP has increased because the estimated number of STCs to be created in 2015 including surplus STCs from previous years is higher than created in 2014.

 

Subsection 40A(1) of the Act provides that the STP for a given year must be specified in the regulations on or before 31 March in that year. The Minister must take into consideration several items under Subsection 40A(3) of the Act before the Governor General makes the regulation under Subsection 40A(1).

 

The Regulation allows the:

 

                2015 RPP of 11.11 per cent to be set under Regulation 23.  Regulation 23 to the Principal Regulations is amended every twelve months and the amendments are machinery in nature and do not substantially alter the existing operation of the Principal Regulations; and

 

                2015 STP of 11.71 per cent to be set under Regulation 23A.  Regulation 23A to the Principal Regulations is amended as required under the Act and the amendments are machinery in nature and do not substantially alter the existing operation of the Principal Regulations. 

 

Consequently a public consultation period was not conducted for the Amendment Regulation.   

 

The Regulation will be a legislative instrument for the purposes of the Legislative Instruments Act 2003.

 

The Regulation will be compatible with the human rights and freedoms recognised or declared in the international instruments listed in section 3 of the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011A Statement of Compatibility with Human Rights was completed (Attachment A).

 

The Regulation commenced on the day after they were registered on the Federal Register of Legislative Instruments.

 

 


Attachment A

Statement of Compatibility with Human Rights

Prepared in accordance with Part 3 of the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011

Renewable Energy (Electricity) Amendment (Percentages) Regulation 2015

This Legislative Instrument is compatible with the human rights and freedoms recognised or declared in the international instruments listed in section 3 of the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011.

Overview of the Legislative Instrument

The amendment to the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Regulations 2001 (the Regulations) is required to set the Renewable Power Percentage (RPP) and the Small-scale Technology Percentage (STP) for 2015. The 2015 RPP is 11.11 per cent which has increased from 9.87 per cent for 2014.  The 2015 STP will be set at 11.71 per cent which has increased from 10.48 per cent for 2014.

The RPP sets the rate of liability for the given compliance year under the Large-scale Renewable Energy Target (LRET).  The STP sets the rate of liability for the given compliance year under the Small-scale Renewable Energy Scheme (SRES).  The Regulation prescribing the RPP and STP must be made on or before 31 March.  

The setting of the RPP and STP is considered minor and machinery as the percentages are an administrative requirement under section 39 and section 40A of the Renewable Energy (Electricity) Act 2000 (the Act) respectively, to achieve the objectives of the Act which is to increase Australia’s renewable energy by setting targets.  The Act requires entities that make relevant acquisitions of electricity to purchase certificates from accredited renewable energy power stations. The Act also requires entities that make relevant acquisitions of electricity to purchase certificates from entities, individuals or companies that create valid certificates from small unit installations, including solar water heaters and small photovoltaic (solar), wind and hydro systems.

Human rights implications

This Legislative Instrument does not engage any of the applicable rights or freedoms.

Conclusion

This Legislative Instrument is compatible with human rights as it does not raise any human rights issues.

 

 

 

 

Minister for the Environment