Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

Primary content

SLI 2012 No. 53 Regulations as made
This regulation amends the Military Justice (Interim Measures) (Remuneration and Entitlements) Regulations 2011 to include the adjusted remuneration amounts with a retrospective operation for the Chief Judge Advocate and judge advocates. The regulation is required to pass on the adjustments in line with the prescribed salary adjustments made by the Remuneration Review Tribunal to these positions by virtue of the operation of the Military Justice (Interim Measures) Act (No.1) 2009.
Administered by: Defence
Registered 23 Apr 2012
Tabling HistoryDate
Tabled HR08-May-2012
Tabled Senate10-May-2012
Date of repeal 19 Mar 2014
Repealed by Defence (Spent and Redundant Instruments) Repeal Regulation 2014

Statement of Compatibility with Human Rights

 

Prepared in accordance with Part 3 of the Human Rights (Parliamentary Scrutiny) Act 2011.

 

Military Justice (Interim Measures) (Remuneration and Entitlements) Amendment Regulation 2012 (No. 1)

 

Overview

 

The Military Justice (Interim Measures) Act (No. 1) 2009 provides that the remuneration arrangements for the positions of Chief Judge Advocate and Judge Advocate, established under the Defence Force Discipline Act 1982, are to be prescribed by Regulation. These arrangements were included in the Military Justice (Interim Measures) (Remuneration and Entitlements) Regulations 2011, implementing salary adjustments determined by the Remuneration Review Tribunal for ‘Judicial and Related Offices’.

 

On 20 June 2011 (with effect from 1 July 2011), the Remuneration Review Tribunal adjusted the salary of certain statutory office holders, including the Chief Judge Advocate and Judge Advocates. The Military Justice (Interim Measures) (Remuneration and Entitlements) Amendment Regulations 2012 will apply this adjustment.

 

Human rights implications

 

The Regulation does not engage any of the applicable rights or freedoms. It is compatible with human rights as it does not raise any human rights issues.