Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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Determinations/Other as made
This Determination amends the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008 and updates; scope 2 emissions factors; responds to feedback from stakeholders and industry groups; and clarifies methodologies improving the consistency and accuracy of emission estimates.
Administered by: Climate Change and Energy Efficiency
Registered 29 Jun 2011
Tabling HistoryDate
Tabled HR04-Jul-2011
Tabled Senate04-Jul-2011
Date of repeal 09 Aug 2013
Repealed by Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (Spent and Redundant Instruments) Repeal Regulation 2013

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT

 

 

Issued by the Authority of the Minister for Climate Change and Energy Efficiency, the Honourable Greg Combet AM MP

National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Amendment Determination 2011 (No. 1)

The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Act 2007 (the Act) established the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (NGER) system which is a national system for reporting greenhouse gas emissions, energy consumption and energy production by Australian corporations.

The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008 (the Determination) was made under subsection 10(3) of the Act, which provides for the Minister to determine methods, or criteria for methods, for the measurement of (a) greenhouse gas emissions; (b) the production of energy; and (c) the consumption of energy.

This Instrument will amend the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008.

The National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Amendment Determination 2011 (No.1) (the Instrument) aims to achieve the following:

Ÿ     update scope 2 emissions factors for the consumption of electricity which require annual adjustment in line with dispatch decisions within the National Electricity Market made throughout the last financial year;

Ÿ     respond to feedback from stakeholders and industry groups; and

Ÿ     provide clarification of methodologies to improve the consistency and accuracy of emission estimates.

 

The Instrument will commence on registration and apply to the 2011-2012 financial year.  It will affect NGER reports submitted by corporations in October 2012.

Details of the amendments to the Instrument are set out in the Attachment.

The Instrument is a legislative instrument for the purposes of the Legislative Instruments Act 2003.

Consultation

In drafting these amendments NGER reporting entities and other interested stakeholders have been consulted.

With the release of the initial Determination, a commitment was made to review the methods and factors provided within 5 years.  To meet that commitment, the Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (the Department) released the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination Discussion Paper in August 2010.  Thirty-eight (38) submissions were received, covering the range of issues identified in the paper.

After reviewing the submissions and the outcomes of consultation with industry groups, the government released the NGER (Measurement) Amendment Determination Consultation Draft in May 2011 for further consultation.  At the same time, the Department released a detailed response paper of issues addressed in the discussion paper.  The Department received a further 12 submissions from industry and the public on the consultation draft.  After consideration of the submissions final refinements were made to the Instrument, consistent with the results of consultation.

Background

The initial Determination was the result of comprehensive consultation with business and other stakeholders between May 2005 and June 2008 in relation to the Act, the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting Regulations 2008 (the Regulations) and the Instrument.

The initial Instrument was the subject of specific consultations, including the release of two documents for public comment: National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting System, Technical Guidelines for the Estimation of Greenhouse Emissions and Energy at Facility-Level; and Energy, Industrial Process and Waste Sectors in Australia - Discussion Paper and a related overview paper.  Over 70 formal submissions were received from interested organisations and individuals.

A range of the issues identified in the Discussion Paper and raised during the consultation process have been addressed in this amendment to the Instrument.  A number of issues are also being addressed through amendments to the Regulations, which will be implemented in 2011.

Overview of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008

The Act established the legislative framework for the NGER system. The Act provides for an integrated reporting system with the objectives of:

Ÿ     informing government policy formulation and the Australian public;

Ÿ     meeting Australia’s international reporting obligations;

Ÿ     assisting Commonwealth, State and Territory government programs and activities;

Ÿ     underpinning the introduction of an emissions trading scheme in the future; and

Ÿ     avoiding duplication of similar reporting requirements in the States and Territories.

 

The Act makes reporting mandatory for corporations whose energy production, energy use, or greenhouse gas emissions meet certain specified thresholds.

 

The Determination, made under subsection 10(3) of the Act, provides the criteria for establishing methodologies and methods for estimating and measuring the following items from the operation of facilities:

Ÿ     greenhouse gas emissions;

Ÿ     the production of energy; and

Ÿ     the consumption or energy.

 

The structure of the Determination is designed to facilitate the integration of corporate and facility level data provided under the Act with international data standards on greenhouse gas emissions.

The scope of the Determination is given by the following categories of emission sources:

Ÿ     fuel combustion – emissions from the combustion of fuel for energy (see chapter 2);

Ÿ     fugitive emissions from the extraction, production, flaring, processing and distribution of fossil fuels (see chapter 3);

Ÿ     industrial process emissions where a mineral, chemical or metal product is formed using a chemical reaction that generates greenhouse gases as a by-product (see chapter 4); and

Ÿ     waste emissions from waste disposal – either in landfill, as management of wastewater or from waste incineration (see chapter 5).

 

The most important source is fuel combustion, which accounts for over 60 per cent of the emissions reported in the national greenhouse gas inventory.

The scope of the Determination does not include land based emissions covered by the IPCC categories ‘Agriculture’ and ‘Land Use, Land Use Change and Forestry’.  Emissions from fuel combustion by land based industries are, nonetheless, covered by this Determination.

Methods of measurement

The Determination provides methods that allow for both direct emissions monitoring and the estimation of emissions through the tracking of observable, closely-related variables.  This framework reflects the approaches of the international guidelines governing the estimation of national greenhouse gas inventories and international practice such as for the EU Guidelines for the Monitoring and Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions and the US Environment Protection Agency Greenhouse Gas Mandatory Reporting Rule.

At its simplest, emissions may be estimated by reference to reportable data such as fossil fuel consumption, evidenced by invoices, and the use of specified emission factors provided in the Determination. For emissions from fuel combustion, for example, data on fuel consumption would be multiplied by a specific emission factor for that fuel to generate an emissions estimate.  A similar approach was used for over a decade prior to the commencement of the NGER system in the voluntary reporting program Greenhouse Challenge Plus and, before that, Greenhouse Challenge. 

More complex measurement processes may produce more accurate estimates at a facility level through sampling and analysis of the carbon content within fuel consumed and other qualities that affect actual emissions generated by its combustion at a facility.  This approach to emissions estimation has been used for some time, especially in the electricity sector under the Generator Efficiency Standards program.

Direct monitoring, while not common, is an important approach to emissions estimation and is mandatory for the measurement of emissions associated with underground coal mining activities. State legislation requires methane levels to be monitored directly for occupational health and safety reasons.

By drawing on existing emissions estimation practices, where possible, the Amendment Determination aims to minimise reporting burdens on corporations and encourage reporters to balance the costs of using higher order methods with the benefits of potentially more accurate emissions estimates.

The Determination provides four different methods of estimating emissions for most emissions sources.  A summary of each method used in the Determination is provided below.

Method 1: The National Greenhouse Accounts default method

Method 1 provides a class of estimation procedures derived directly from the methodologies used by the Department for the preparation of the National Greenhouse Accounts.  This also ties Method 1 to the international guidelines adopted by the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change for the estimation of greenhouse gas emissions.

Method 1 specifies the use of a designated emissions factor in the estimation of emissions. These emissions factors are national average factors determined by the Department using the Australian Greenhouse Emissions Information System (AGEIS).  Method 1 is most useful and appropriate for emission sources of a homogenous nature, such as emissions from the combustion of a liquid fuels, where the emissions per unit of fuel combusted across all reporting facilities will be similar.

Method 2: Facility specific methods using Australian or international standards provided in the Determination or equivalent.

Method 2 enables corporations to undertake additional measurements, for example, of fuel inputs, in order to gain more accurate estimates of emissions for that facility.  Australian and International standards provide the benchmark for procedures used for the analysis of fuel inputs.

Method 2 is most likely to be useful for fuels which exhibit variability in key qualities such as carbon content from facility to facility.  This method is based on technical guidelines that existed under the Generator Efficiency Standards program.  The possibility to report using this higher order method is encouraged by the Department for all major consumers of fossil fuels.

Method 3: Facility specific sampling and analysis in line with Australian and international standards provided in the Determination.

Method 3 builds upon Method 2 and requires reporters to comply with Australian or equivalent standards for sampling (of fuels or raw materials) as well as standards for the analysis of fuels.

Method 4: Direct monitoring of emissions systems, either on a continuous or periodic basis.

Method 4 aims to directly monitor emissions arising out of a particular activity and can provide high level accuracy in certain circumstances.  This method differs from lower order methods in its focus on the direct outputs of the activity rather than the inputs.  Direct monitoring occurs in the area of underground coal mining reflecting the existing need to closely and accurately monitor emissions for health and safety reasons.

As for Methods 2 and 3, there is a substantial body of documented procedures on monitoring practices and State and Territory government regulatory experience that provide the principal sources of guidance for the establishment of such systems.

Options:  Different methods for different sources

Reporters may select different methods for each source.  The Reporter may elect to use a different method based on the nature and content of the operation and emissions, subject to certain restrictions.  In part, these differences reflect method availability.  For example, for solid fuels, only Method 1 has been provided for methane and nitrous oxide, reflecting the minor nature of the emission sources, whereas four methods are available for carbon dioxide.


ATTACHMENT A

Details of the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Amendment Determination 2011 (No.1)

 
Item 1 – Name of Determination

This item provides that the title of the Instrument is the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Amendment Determination 2011 (No. 1).

Item 2 – Commencement

This item provides for the amendments in Schedule 1 to commence on 1 July 2011. The amendments in Schedule 2 commence on 1 July 2012

Item 3 – Amendment of National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008

This item outlines that Schedule 1 and 2 amend the National Greenhouse and Energy Reporting (Measurement) Determination 2008 (the Determination).

Item 4 – Application

This item clarifies that the amendments made in Schedule 1 will apply to the 2011-2012 financial year and subsequent financial years. Schedule 2 will apply to the 2012-2013 financial year and subsequent financial years.

SCHEDULE 1 AMENDMENTS

The explanations of amendments provided below are grouped by division within the NGER Determination. Individual amendment items are referenced to the amendment number as stated in the NGER Amendment Determination 2011.

CHAPTER 1 GENERAL

The proposed amendments to Chapter 1 of the Determination add additional definitions required to complement changes to the manufacture of solid fuels.

Part 1.1 Overview, Division 1.1.2 Definitions and Interpretations

 

Item

Commentary

[1]-[3]

Adds definitions for coal briquettes, pyrolysis of coal and corrects the title of the GHG Uncertainty Protocol.

 

Part 1.2 General, Division 1.2.1 Measurement and Standards

The amendment changes the definition of completeness to provide more certainty for industry. The completeness principle is clarified to only include emissions sources that are explicitly identified within Determination section 1.10.

Item

Commentary

[4]

Amends the definition of completeness.

 

Part 1.3 Direct measurement of emissions, Division 1.3.2 Operation of method 4 (CEM)[1], Division 1.3.3 Operation of method 4 (PEM)[2]

The amendment clarifies that for sources where there is no Method 1 available in the Determination, the Method 4 estimations using continuous or periodic emissions monitoring are not required to be reconciled.

Item

Commentary

[5]

Includes an exclusion where there is no Method 1 available for the source.

 

CHAPTER 2 FUEL COMBUSTION

Part 2.2 Emissions released from the combustion of solid fuels, Division 2.2.1 Preliminary

The amendment addresses concerns of small electricity generators in relation to the use of higher order methods to estimate emissions from the combustion of their primary solid fuels where these requirements do not exist for other industries. The amendment establishes a threshold excluding small generators from the requirement to use higher order methods based on thresholds used in the Generator Efficiency Standards program.

Item

Commentary

[6]

Grammatical correction.

[7]

Method 2 or higher must be used when the principle activity of the facility is electricity generation, and the generating unit has the capacity to produce 30 megawatt or more of electricity, and generates more than 50,000,000 kilowatt hours of electricity in a reporting year.

 
Part 2.2 Emissions released from the combustion of solid fuels, Division 2.2.3 Method 2 – emissions from solid fuels

The furnace ash and fly ash sampling requirements to identify key characteristics of ash, including carbon content, are set out in the Determination. The amendment allows alternate collection methods to be used when the those methods are not feasible.

The existing approach of sampling fly ash as a function of load has a significant cost imposition and evidence has shown that the variation in carbon in relation to load to be relatively narrow for large base load electricity generators. Exceptions occur in cases where load profiles vary significantly throughout the operation of the facility, or at times when operating conditions change.

Item

Commentary

[8]

Grammatical correction.

[9]

Allow the use of alternate furnace ash collection methods that provide representative sampling, where technical and safety concern make clauses (a) and (b) not feasible.

[10]

Allows the use of alternate fly ash collection procedures that provides representative samples, where technical and safety concerns make the procedures outlined in the table in section 2.11 not feasible.

The sampling frequencies for fly ash in the table in section 2.11 are amended to include additional sampling obligations when there are significant changes in operating conditions. If there are no changes to operating conditions the existing sampling frequencies are maintained.

 

Part 2.3 Emissions released from the combustion of gaseous fuels, Division 2.3.1 Preliminary

Similarly to the amendment to Part 2.2, this amendment addresses concerns of small electricity generators in relation to the use of higher order methods to estimate emissions from the combustion of their primary gaseous fuels, where these requirements do not exist for other industries. The amendment establishes a threshold excluding small generators from the requirement to use higher order methods based on thresholds used in the Generator Efficiency Standards program.

Item

Commentary

[11]

Method 2 or higher must be used when the principle activity of the facility is electricity generation, and the generating unit has the capacity to produce 30 megawatt or more of electricity, and generates more than 50,000,000 kilowatt hours of electricity in a reporting year.

 

Part 2.4 Emissions released from the combustion of liquid fuels, Division 2.4.5A Methods for estimating emissions from carbon dioxide using an estimated oxidation factor

Petroleum based oils and greases are regularly consumed for transport purposes, particularly within combustion engines. This amendment clarifies the application of the method to include the consumption of petroleum based oils and greases for transport purposes. Minor clarifications have also been included to make the Determination consistent.

Item

Commentary

[12]

Removes the restriction ‘for stationary energy’ purposes and clarifies the means by which the quantity is to be measured through reference to 2.4.6.

[13]

References to the quantity of petroleum based oils and greases are aligned throughout the section by replacing Cpog with Qpog. In addition, the term ‘waste oil’ is replaced with ‘transferred offsite’ to avoid confusion. Some oils transferred offsite are not considered waste.

 

Part 2.5, Emissions released from fuel use by particular industries, Division 2.5.2 Energy – manufacture of solid fuels

The manufacture of solid fuels is undertaken using a range of materials and techniques. The current Determination restricts the estimation of emissions to fuels manufactured within coke ovens. Char production, for example, had been identified as another source of emissions. In order to accommodate this, Division 2.5.2 will apply to the manufacture of all solid fuels and use a carbon mass balance approach. The division is also split to distinguish those production plants that form part of an integrated metalwork, which are referred to Part 4.4, and those manufactured separately, that will use the carbon mass balance approach outlined in Subsection 2.58.

Item

Commentary

[14]

Replacement of the source name to remove coke ovens restriction.

[15]

Specifies the scope of fuel manufacturing covered within the source to those produced through the pyrolysis of coal or coal briquette process. Further definitions have been added in Section 1.08. Other solid fuels that can be reported within this source include: coke oven coke, coke breeze, foundry coke and retort coke; coal char and coal briquettes.

[16]

Establishes a carbon mass balance approach to measuring emissions for the manufacture of solid fuels. Where the fuel is manufactured as part of an integrated metal production process, the emissions are to be estimated using Part 4.4. For all other circumstances the method outlined in subsection (3) must be used.

[17]

Details the estimation approach and parameters for calculating emissions from the manufacture of solid fuels using a carbon mass balance approach.

 

CHAPTER 3 FUGITIVE EMISSIONS

Part 3.2 Coal Mining – Fugitive emissions, Division 3.2.2 Underground mines

Coal mine waste gases that mainly consist of methane (CH4) may include a component of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas that is not combusted during flaring. The amendment allows the CO2 component to be accounted for separately from the majority methane component that is flared. This results in a more accurate emissions estimate.

Item

Commentary

[18]

Corrects a missing reference.

[19]

Refines the formula for estimating CO2 emissions from coal mine waste gas, by allowing reporters to sample and account for the CO2 within the waste gas separately from the flared methane component. This applies only to Method 2 and higher.

 

Part 3.3 Oil and natural gas – fugitive emissions, Division 3.3.2 Oil or gas exploration

The fugitive flaring emissions from oil or gas exploration may include a component of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas that is not combusted during flaring. The amendment allows the CO2 component to be accounted for separately from the flared methane (CH4) component. This results in a more accurate emissions estimate. The existing Method 2 for methane emissions has been withdrawn as throughput based emission factors are inappropriate for Method 2.

 

Item

Commentary

[20]

Withdrawal of Method 2 for estimating methane emissions.

[21]

Refines the formula for estimating CO2 emissions from oil or gas exploration, by allowing reporters to sample and account for the CO2 separately from the flared methane component. This applies only to Method 2 for gaseous fuels and higher.

 

Part 3.3 Oil and natural gas – fugitive emissions, Division 3.3.3 Crude oil production

The fugitive flaring emissions from crude oil production may include a component of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas that is not combusted during flaring. The amendment allows the CO2 component to be accounted for separately from the flared hydrocarbon component. This results in a more accurate emissions estimate. The existing Method 2 for methane emissions has been withdrawn as throughput based emission factors are inappropriate for Method 2.

Item

Commentary

[22]

Withdraws the availability of Method 2 for estimating methane emissions.

[23]

Clarifies the removal of Method 2 for methane estimation.

[24]

Refines the formula for estimating CO2 emissions from crude oil production, by allowing reporters to sample and account for the CO2 within the gas separately from the flared methane component. This applies only to Method 2 for gaseous fuels and higher.

[25]

Grammatical correction.

[26]

Withdraws Method 2 for estimating methane emissions for crude oil production (flared).

 
Part 3.3 Oil and natural gas – fugitive emissions, Division 3.3.5 Crude oil refining

The fugitive flared emissions from crude oil refining may include a component of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas that is not combusted during flaring. The amendment allows the CO2 component to be accounted for separately from the flared hydrocarbon component. This results in a more accurate emissions estimate. The existing Method 2 for methane emissions has been withdrawn as throughput based emission factors are inappropriate for Method 2.

Item

Commentary

[27]

Withdraws the availability of Method 2 for estimating methane emissions.

[28]

Clarifies the withdrawal of Method 2 for methane estimation.

[29]

Subscript correction.

[30]

Refines the formula for estimating CO2 emissions from crude oil refining, by allowing reporters to sample and account for the CO2 within the gas separately from the flared methane component. This applies only to Method 2 and higher.

[31]

Amends the Method 3 to be based on Method 2 instead of Method 1.

 

Part 3.3 Oil and natural gas – fugitive emissions, Division 3.3.8 Natural gas distribution

Clarification of the boundaries of existing variables within the estimation method used to calculate emissions from natural gas distribution. Changes include minor textual and subscript updates.

Item

Commentary

[32]

Corrects subscript references in the formula.

[33]

Matches subscript references to the formula.

[34]

Matches subscript references to the formula.

[35]

Matches subscript references to the formula.

 

Part 3.3 Oil and natural gas – fugitive emissions, Division 3.3.9 Natural gas production or processing (emissions that are vented or flared

The fugitive flared emissions from natural gas production or processing may include a component of carbon dioxide (CO2) gas that is not combusted during flaring. The amendment allows the CO2 component to be accounted for separately from the flared hydrocarbon component. This results in more accurate emissions estimates. The existing Method 2 for methane emissions has been withdrawn as throughput based emission factors are inappropriate for Method 2.

 

Item

Commentary

[36]

Withdraws the availability of Method 2 for estimating methane emissions.

[37]

Clarifies the withdrawal of Method 2 for methane estimation.

[38]

Refines the formula for estimating CO2 emissions from natural gas production and processing, by allowing reporters to sample and account for the CO2 within the gas separately from the flared methane component. This applies only to Method 2 and higher.

[39]

Amends Method 3 as an extension of Method 2 instead of Method 1

 

CHAPTER 4 INDUSTRIAL PROCESSES

Part 4.2 Industrial processes – mineral products, Division 4.2.2 Lime production

The emission estimates from lime production are affected by the quantity of lime kiln dust produced. The amendments update the method for estimating emissions to include those related to the production of lime kiln dust, a by-product of lime production. Additional standards are referenced to assist reporters.

Additional default factors relating to production of dolomitic and magnesian lime are added to Method 1, reflecting the different emissions profiles.

Item

Commentary

[40]

Updates Method 1 to include emissions from the calcinations of lime kiln dust in the production process.

Addition of default factors and definitions for magnesian and dolomitic lime to reflect emissions generated from higher magnesium carbonate content in the limestone.

Includes, in Method 2, analysis of Calcium Oxide (CaO) and Magnesium Oxide (MgO) contained within the carbonate source used for producing lime.

[41]

Adds additional standards for reporters to reference when sampling and analysing the composition of lime.

 
Part 4.2 Industrial processes – mineral products, Division 4.2.3 Use of carbonates for production of a product other than cement clinker, lime or soda ash

Specifies that phosphoric acid is to be reported within this source. Other amendments reflect stylistic updates.

Item

Commentary

[42]

Amendment adds emissions from phosphoric acid production to the positive list of activities that are to be reported within this source.

[43]

Amendment italicizes the title of the referenced standard.

 

Part 4.3 Industrial processes – chemical industry, Division 4.3.5 Chemical or mineral production, other than carbide production, using a carbon reductant or carbon anode

The method for estimating emissions is updated to a carbon mass balance method. This refinement takes account of carbon embedded within products and waste by-products which do not occur as an emission. Modifications are made to the source name and source application to clarify the scope of emissions included in the source.

Item

Commentary

[44]

Changes the source heading to include emissions from chemical and mineral production using a carbon anode.

[45]

Adds emissions from fused alumina, magnesia and zirconia to the positive list of activities to be reported within this source.

[46]

Details the estimation approach and parameters for calculating the emissions from chemical or mineral production using a carbon mass balance approach.

 

Part 4.4 Industrial processes – metal industry, Division 4.4.1 Iron, steel or other metal production using an integrated metalworks

Clarifies the scope of emissions within the source to include iron and steel production that uses an electric arc furnace, or consumes coke produced offsite. Other metals such as lead and silicon can continue to use this method if it is part of an integrated metalworks.

 

Item

Commentary

[47]

Expands the method for the estimation of emissions from iron and steel to include all production techniques; and other metals that form an integrated metal works, i.e. manufacture of a metal and coke in an integrated production process.

 

CHAPTER 5 WASTE

Part 5.2 Solid waste disposal on land, Division 5.2.2 Method 1 – emissions of methane released from landfill

Currently the Determination uses a default value, obtained from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines, of 0.5 for the fraction of degradable organic carbon dissimilated (DOCf). Drawing on changes to the method used in the National Greenhouse Gas Inventory the amendment identifies the DOCf values based on specific waste mix types, improving the accuracy of waste emissions estimates.

Item

Commentary

[48]

Grammatical correction.

[49]

Replaces the default DOCf value used for Method 1 estimation listed in the IPCC guidelines with values, specified by waste mix type, listed in section 5.14A.

[50]

Inserts a list of DOCf values separated by waste mix types for use in Method 1 estimation.

 

Part 5.2 Solid waste disposal on land, Division 5.2.3 Method 2 – emissions of methane released from landfill

Currently the Determination uses a default value, obtained from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines, of 0.5 for the fraction degradable organic carbon dissimilated (DOCf). Drawing on changes to the methods used in the National Greenhouse Accounts the amendment identifies the DOCf values based on waste mix types, improving the accuracy of waste emissions estimates.

Item

Commentary

[51]

Replaces the default DOCf definition used for Method 2 estimation with specified values based on waste mix types listed in section 5.14A.

 

Part 5.3 Wastewater handling, Division 5.3.2 Method 1 – methane released from wastewater handling (domestic and commercial)

The symbol ‘F’ used in the Determination to refer to the fraction of COD (chemical oxygen demand) anaerobically treated is inconsistent with the IPCC guidelines. The amendment updates the ‘F’ with ‘MCF’ (methane correction factor) to make it consistent. This is an update to terminology and has no impact on the estimation method.

Item

Commentary

[52]

Replaces Fwan and Fslan with MCFww and MCFsl in the formula in line with the IPCC guidelines.

[53]

Replaces the definition of Fwan, with MCFww to make it consistent with the formula.

[54]

Replaces the definition of Fslan with MCFsl to make it consistent with the formula.

[55]

Inserts the definition for Methane Correction Factor (MCF).

 
Part 5.3 Wastewater handling (domestic and commercial), Division 5.3.3 Method 1 –emissions of nitrous oxide released from wastewater handling (domestic and commercial)

The amendment updates the estimation method for nitrous oxide emissions to clarify the methods for obtaining Nin, Ntrl, and Ntro values and differentiating the estimation of nitrogen leaving the plant by aquatic environment.

Item

Commentary

[56]

Substitution of 5.31 (1) to include additional estimation guidance for Nin, Ntrl, and Ntro by providing formulas and definitions.

Re-orders and includes definitions and emissions factors for nitrogen leaving the plant by discharge environment.

 

Part 5.4 Wastewater handling (industrial), Division 5.4.1 Preliminary

Restates the application of the part to remove nitrification and denitrification processes that are not part of the method.

 

Item

Commentary

[57]

Amends the statement outlining the application of the part to remove nitrification and denitrification processes that do not apply to the source.

 

Part 5.4 Wastewater handling (industrial), Division 5.4.2 Method 1 – methane released from wastewater handling (industrial)

The amendment includes COD (chemical oxygen demand) leaving the plant as effluent (CODeff) in the estimation method for wastewater to allow for its subtraction from emissions estimates. This makes the estimation method consistent with domestic and commercial wastewater handling.

In addition, the symbol ‘F’ used in the Determination to refer to the fraction of COD anaerobically treated is inconsistent with the IPCC guidelines. The amendment updates the ‘F’ with ‘MCF’ (methane correction factor) to make it consistent. This is a change in terminology and has no impact on the estimation method.

Item

Commentary

[58]

Replaces Fwan and Fslan with MCFww and MCFsl in the formula for CH4gen.

Inclusion of CODeff that was omitted into the formula for CH4gen.

[59]

Defines the CODeff values added to the formula for CH4gen.

[60]

Replaces the definition of Fwan, with MCFww to make it consistent with the formula.

[61]

Replaces the definition of Fslan with MCFsl to make it consistent with the formula.

[62]

Replaces an occurrence of Fwan with MCFww for consistency.

[63]

Replaces an occurrence of Fwan with MCFww for consistency.

[64]

Inserts the definition of methane correction factor (MCF).

 

Part 5.5 Waste incineration

Amendment adds Method 4 to the available methods for waste incineration to improve the consistency of available with methods available for fuel combustion.

Item

Commentary

[65]

Adds Method 4 reporting for waste incineration.

 

CHAPTER 6 ENERGY

No changes

CHAPTER 7 SCOPE 2 EMISSIONS

No changes

CHAPTER 8 UNCERTAINTY

Part 8.3 How to assess uncertainty when using method 1

Clarification to the estimation of uncertainty for energy content factors to allow the use of specific uncertainty levels estimated in accordance with section 7 of the GHG Protocol guidance on uncertainty assessment in GHG inventories and calculating statistical parameter uncertainty. Also includes minor scope adjustments and the inclusion of uncertainty levels for Aluminium production.

Item

Commentary

[66]

Allows for uncertainty levels for energy content factors to be estimated using the GHG Protocol Guidance on Uncertainty Assessment in GHG Inventories and Calculating Statistical Parameter Uncertainty.

[67]

Removal of ‘vented’ under item 8 to allow vented emissions to use the uncertainty value of 50.

[68]

Inclusion of emission factors and activity uncertainty levels for emission estimates from aluminium production.

 

SCHEDULE 1

Inclusion of additional fuel types and update of the Scope 2 emission factors that are updated annually in line with dispatch decisions within the National Electricity Market made throughout the last financial year. Minor amendment removing a black coal definition that has been superceded.

Item

Commentary

[69]

Removal of supplementary black coal definition that has been superceded.

[70]

Inclusion of additional fuel types used in the transport industry with associated energy content and emissions factors.

[71]

Annual update of scope 2 emission factors reflecting changes within the National Electricity Market in the last financial year.

 

Further Amendments

Item

Commentary

[72]

Minor amendments including:

               correction of incorrect or obsolete references;

               update of standards to latest versions;

               changes to terms for consistency; and

               clarification of two fuel type names in Schedules 1, 2 and 3.


SCHEDULE 2 AMENDMENTS

These amendments commence on 1 July 2012.

Part 4.4 Industrial processes – metal industry, Division 4.4.1 Ferroalloys production

The method for estimating emissions is updated to a carbon mass balance method to align available methods with those used in iron and steel. This refinement takes account of carbon embedded within products and waste by-products which do not occur as an emission.

Item

Commentary

[73]

Details the estimation approach and parameters for calculating the emissions from ferroalloys production using a carbon mass balance approach.

 

Part 4.4 Industrial processes – metal industry, Division 4.4.1 Other metals production

The method for estimating emissions is updated to a carbon mass balance method to align available methods with those used in iron and steel. This refinement takes account of carbon embedded within products and waste by-products which do not occur as an emission.

Item

Commentary

[74]

Details the estimation approach and parameters for calculating the emissions from other metals production using a carbon mass balance approach.


ATTACHMENT B

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Chapter 1 General

The following standard can be obtained at: http://www.ghgprotocol.org/calculation-tools/all-tools

·            GHG Uncertainty protocol guidance on uncertainty assessment in GHG inventories and calculating statistical parameter uncertainty (September 2003) v1.0

Chapter 4 Industrial processes emissions
Section 4.15

The following standard can be obtained at: http://www.saiglobal.com/shop/Script/search.asp

·            ASTM C25-06 Standard Test Methods for Chemical Analysis of Limestone, Quicklime, and Hydrated Lime.

Section 4.15

The following standard can be obtained at: http://www.saiglobal.com/shop/Script/search.asp

·            ASTM C50-00 (2006) Standard Practice for Sampling, Sample Preparation, Packaging, and Marking of Lime and Limestone Products.

Section 4.15

The following standard can be obtained at: http://www.saiglobal.com/shop/Script/search.asp

·            AS 4489.0–1997 Test methods for limes and limestones — General introduction and list of methods.

Section 4.33

The following standard can be obtained at: http://www.saiglobal.com/shop/Script/search.asp

·            ASTM C25-06 Standard Test Methods for Chemical Analysis of Limestone, Quicklime, and Hydrated Lime.

 



[1] Continuous Emissions Monitoring

[2] Periodic Emissions Monitoring