Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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Lists as made
This instrument amends the List of Threatened Ecological Communities (16/07/2000) to include the Lowland Native Grasslands of Tasmania in the critically endangered category.
Administered by: Environment
Made 18 Jun 2009
Registered 24 Jun 2009
Tabled HR 11 Aug 2009
Tabled Senate 11 Aug 2009
Date of repeal 17 Mar 2015
Repealed by Spent and Redundant Instruments Repeal Regulation 2015 (No. 1)
This Legislative Instrument has been subject to a Motion to Disallow:
Motion Date:
15-Sep-2009
Expiry Date:
23-Nov-2009
House:
House of Reps
Details:
Full
Resolution:
Negatived
Resolution Date:
26-Oct-2009
Resolution Time:
Provisions:
Motion Date:
15-Sep-2009
Expiry Date:
27-Nov-2009
House:
Senate
Details:
Full
Resolution:
Negatived
Resolution Date:
17-Sep-2009
Resolution Time:
Provisions:

 

 

Commonwealth of Australia

 

Inclusion of ecological communities in the list of threatened ecological communities under section 181 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 

 

I, PETER ROBERT GARRETT, Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts, pursuant to section 184(1)(a) of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, hereby amend the list referred to in section 181 of that Act by:

 

including in the list in the critically endangered category

Lowland Native Grasslands of Tasmania

as described in the Schedule to this instrument.

                                              

 

 

 

 

Dated this…Eighteenth..........day of…........June.........................2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Peter Robert Garrett

 

Minister for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts

 


SCHEDULE

Lowland Native Grasslands of Tasmania

 

The Lowland Native Grassland of Tasmania is a type of temperate grassland. The ecological community is comprised of two major sub-types differentiated by the dominant native tussock-forming perennial grass species:  Lowland Poa labillardierei Grassland and Lowland Themeda triandra Grassland. They are typically treeless (or have a very sparse tree/shrub layer) and generally occur on valley flats to low slopes at elevations up to 600 m above sea level.

 

The P. labillardierei sub-type is relatively species-poor and consists of grasslands typically dominated by tussocks of P. labillardierei. Tussocks may be large and spreading or small and tufty depending on the situation and may form a closed sward or an open layer with smaller grasses, lichens and other herbs such as lilies, daisies and orchids in the inter-tussock spaces.

 

The T. triandra sub-type is typically dominated by T. triandra and is floristically diverse. Other common grasses in this grassland include species of the Austrodanthonia, Austrostipa and Poa genera. It is often characterised by a rich variety of lilies, orchids, daisies and other herbs in patches between grass tussocks although it can occur where T. triandra dominates almost to the exclusion of other species.

 

The Lowland Native Grasslands of Tasmania ecological community is restricted to the lowlands of Tasmania, within localised areas of northwest Tasmania and on the islands of Bass Strait. It occurs in the following Interim Biogeographic Regionalisation for Australia Bioregions: Ben Lomond, Northern Midlands, Northern Slopes, King, Flinders, South East and Southern Ranges.

 

The key diagnostic characteristics of the ecological community are:

 

  • It is typically found in valley bottoms and gentle slopes below 600 m above seal level (asl) (but can occur up to 700 m asl);
  • It is typically treeless with, at most, a sparse tree cover;
  • The vegetation is predominantly native;
  • Dominant[1] grasses often form a dense sward;
  • The ecological community occurs in two forms:
    • Grasslands dominated by T. triandra (Kangaroo Grass) – including sub-coastal grasslands co-dominated by T. triandra and P. rodwayi (Velvet Tussock Grass).
    • Grasslands dominated by P. labillardierei (Silver Tussock Grass)
  • Inter-tussock spaces occupied by native herbs, including grasses, lilies, daisies and orchids;
  • It may be utilised by a wide range of native animal species;
  • It can be in a mosaic where Themeda, Poa, Austrodanthonia or Austrostipa species co-occur (but Themeda or Poa remain dominant);
  • It can include natural and disturbance-induced grassland; and
  • The geographic distribution is limited to the following bioregions in Tasmania: Ben Lomond, Northern Midlands, Northern Slopes, South East, King, Flinders and Southern Ranges.

 

 

 

 

Additional features that add value to a patch of the ecological community include:

·              a high native species richness;
·              large patch size or connectivity to a large native vegetation remnant;
·              minimal weed invasion;
·              presence of threatened plant and/or animal species; and
·              presence of mosses, lichens or a soil crust on the soil surface.

 

 

 



[1] Dominance is where a species (or two or more species for co-dominance) comprises the major component of its vegetation layer, usually measured as ≥ 50% of the projective foliage cover.