Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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Standard 2.1.1 Food Standards as amended, taking into account amendments up to Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Amendment No. 111 – 2009
This Standard defines a number of products composed of cereals, qualifies the use of the term ‘bread’, and requires the mandatory fortification of flour for bread making with thiamin in Australia.
Administered by: Health
Registered 01 Dec 2009
Start Date 13 Aug 2009
End Date 12 Sep 2009
Date of repeal 01 Mar 2016
Repealed by Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code - Standard 5.1.1 - Revocation and Transitional Provisions - 2014 revision

Standard 2.1.1

 

Cereals and Cereal Products

 

 

Purpose

 

This Standard defines a number of products composed of cereals, qualifies the use of the term ‘bread’, and requires the mandatory fortification of flour for bread making with thiamin in Australia.

 

To commence on 13 September 2009:

 

This Standard defines a number of products composed of cereals, qualifies the use of the term ‘bread’, and requires the mandatory fortification of wheat flour for making bread with folate in Australia and thiamin, in Australia only.

 

To commence on 27 September 2009:

 

This Standard defines a number of products composed of cereals and qualifies the use of the term ‘bread’.  It also requires the mandatory fortification of wheat flour for making bread with thiamin and folic acid (Australia only) and the mandatory replacement of non-iodised salt with iodised salt in bread (New Zealand only).

 

To commence on 9 October 2009:

 

This Standard defines a number of products composed of cereals and qualifies the use of the term ‘bread’.  It also requires the mandatory fortification of wheat flour for making bread with thiamin and folic acid (Australia only) and the mandatory replacement of non-iodised salt with iodised salt in bread in Australia and New Zealand.

 

Table of Provisions

 

1            Interpretation

2            Composition of bread

3            Use of the word ‘bread’

4            Flour for making bread

 

Clauses

 

1            Interpretation

 

In this Code –

 

bread means the product made by baking a yeast-leavened dough prepared from one or more cereal flours or meals and water.

 

flour products means the cooked or uncooked products, other than bread, of one or more flours, meals or cereals.

 


flours or meals means the products of grinding or milling of cereals, legumes or other seeds.

 

wholegrain means the intact grain or the dehulled, ground, milled, cracked or flaked grain where the constituents – endosperm, germ and bran – are present in such proportions that represent the typical ratio of those fractions occurring in the whole cereal, and includes wholemeal.

 

wholemeal means the product containing all the milled constituents of the grain in such proportions that it represents the typical ratio of those fractions occurring in the whole cereal.

 

To commence on 13 September 2009:

 

1A          Definition of bread for certain purposes

 

The definition of bread for the purposes of the mandatory addition of folic acid, thiamin and iodised salt to bread or wheat flour for making bread, does not include –

 

(a)          pizza bases;

(b)          breadcrumbs;

(c)          pastries;

(d)          cakes, including but not limited to brioche, panettone and stollen;

(e)          biscuits; or

(f)           crackers.

 

2            Composition of bread

 

Bread may contain other foods.

 

3            Use of the word ‘bread’

 

This Standard does not prohibit the word ‘bread’ on the label of products that traditionally use that term.

 

Editorial note:

 

As an example, products are traditionally described by names such as ‘shortbread’, ‘soda bread’, ‘pita bread’ and ‘crispbread’.

 

See Standard 1.2.3 – Mandatory Warning and Advisory Statements and Declarations for requirements for declaring the presence of certain specified substances that must always be declared in the label of the food.

 

4            Flour for making bread

 

(1)          Subclause (2) does not apply to flour for bread making produced in, or imported into, New Zealand.

 

(2)          Flour for making bread must contain no less than 6.4 mg/kg of thiamin.


 

 

To commence on 13 September 2009:

 

4            Wheat flour for making bread

 

 

 

Editorial note:

 

This clause does not apply in New Zealand.

 

It is the intention that a variation to this clause will be developed for New Zealand.  In the interim, however, New Zealand has varied from this clause under Annex D of the Agreement between the Government of Australia and the Government of New Zealand Concerning a Joint Food Standards System, and has issued a food standard under section 11C of the New Zealand Food Act 1981

 

 

 

(1)          Subclause 1(2) of Standard 1.1.1 does not apply to this clause.

 

(2)          Wheat flour for making bread must contain –

 

(a)          no less than 2 mg/kg and no more than 3 mg/kg of folic acid; and

(b)          no less than 6.4 mg/kg of thiamin. 

 

 

 

(3)          For the purposes of this clause wheat flour includes wholemeal wheat flour for bread making.

(4)          Subclause 4(2) does not apply to wheat flour for making bread, which is represented as organic.

 

(5)          Paragraph 4(2)(b) does not apply to wheat flour for making bread sold or prepared for sale in, or imported into, New Zealand.

 

 

 

Editorial note:

 

The maximum limit for folic acid given in paragraph 4(2)(a) ensures the addition of folic acid to wheat flour for making bread in Australia is in controlled amounts to provide for a safe population intake of dietary folic acid.  Paragraph 4(2)(a) will be reviewed, when sufficient monitoring data are available to assess the impact of this mandatory requirement.

 

Paragraph 4(2)(b) will be reviewed to assess the future need for this mandatory requirement.

 

Standard 1.3.2 regulates the voluntary addition of folate to both cereal flours and bread.  These permissions will be retained to enable manufacturers to fortify specialised non - wheat flour and breads, such as, gluten free bread.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

To commence on 27 September 2009:

 

5            Mandatory addition of iodised salt to bread (New Zealand only)

 

(1)          Subclause 1(2) of Standard 1.1.1 does not apply to this clause.

 

(2)          Subclause (3) does not apply to bread produced in, or imported into Australia.

 

(3)          Where salt is added to bread it must be iodised salt.

 

(4)          Subclause (3) does not apply to bread which is represented as organic.

 

 

 

 

To commence on 9 October 2009:

 

5            Mandatory addition of iodised salt to bread

 

(1)          Subclause 1(2) of Standard 1.1.1 does not apply to this clause.

 

(2)          Iodised salt must be used for making bread where salt would otherwise be used.

 

(3)          Subclause (2) does not apply to:

 

(a)          bread which is represented as organic;

(b)          the addition of salt (for example rock salt) to the surface of bread; or

(c)          the addition of other food containing salt during the making of bread.

 

 

 

To commence on 27 September 2009:

 

Editorial note:

 

The intention of clause 5 is to require the replacement of non-iodised with iodised salt where it is used as an ingredient in the manufacture of bread.  The New Zealand Standard issued under section 11L of the New Zealand Food Act 1981 that adopts clause 5 limits the application of clause 5 to bread produced for the New Zealand domestic market only.

 

Clause 5 will be reviewed when sufficient monitoring data are available to assess the impact of this mandatory requirement.

 

Standard 2.10.2 sets out the compositional requirements for iodised salt.  The target level of iodine when manufacturing iodised salt for addition to bread ideally would be the mid-point of the iodisation range i.e. 45 mg of iodine per kilogram of salt.