Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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Food Standards as made
This instrument amends food standards in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code.
Administered by: Health
Exempt from sunsetting by the Legislative Instruments Act 2003 s 54(1), Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991 s 82(2)
Registered 14 Aug 2008
Tabling HistoryDate
Tabled HR26-Aug-2008
Tabled Senate26-Aug-2008
Date of repeal 19 Mar 2014
Repealed by Health (Spent and Redundant Instruments) Repeal Regulation 2014

Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Amendment No. 101 – 2008

 

Food Standards Australia New Zealand Act 1991

 

Preamble

 

The variations set forth in the Schedule below are variations to Standards in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code published by the National Health and Medical Research Council in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, No. P 27, on 27 August 1987, which have been varied from time to time.

 

Citation

 

These variations may be collectively known as the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code – Amendment No. 101 – 2008.

 

Commencement

 

These variations commence on 14 August 2008.

 

Note:  These variations were published in the Commonwealth of Australia Food Standards Gazette No. FSC 43 on 14 August 2008.

 

SCHEDULE

 

[1]          The Editorial notes in the Standards listed in Column 1 of the Table to this item are varied by omitting the Editorial notes listed in Column 2.

 

Table to Item 1

 

Column 1

Standard

Column 2

Editorial note

Standard 1.1.1

The Editorial note following subclause 1(5)

Standard 1.1A.6

The Editorial note following clause 3

Standard 1.2.3

The Editorial note following clause 2 but before the Table to that clause ; the Editorial note following clause 4 and before the Table to that clause; the Editorial note following clause 5 and before the Table to that clause

Standard 1.2.4

The Editorial notes following the Tables to clauses 4 and 6; the Editorial note following Schedule 1

Standard 1.2.5

The Editorial note following subclause 4(3)

Standard 1.2.8

The Editorial notes following the definitions of biologically active substance and nutrition claim; the Editorial notes following clauses 14, 16 and 17; the Editorial notes following subclauses 5(5), 13(6), 15(3), 15(4)

Standard 1.2.9

The Editorial note following subclause 2(2)


 

Standard 1.2.10

The Editorial note following clause 5

Standard 1.2.11

The Editorial note following subclause 1(1A)

Standard 1.3.1

The Editorial note following the definition of processed food in clause 1; the Editorial notes following clauses 7 and 9; the Editorial note following Schedule 5

Standard 1.3.3

The Editorial note following the Table to clause 3

Standard 1.4.2

The Editorial note following clause 2

Standard 1.5.3

The Editorial note following the Table to clause 4

Standard 2.4.1

The Editorial notes following clauses 1 and 2

Standard 2.5.1

The Editorial note following clause 4

Standard 2.5.2

The Editorial note following clause 3

Standard 2.5.3

The Editorial notes following clauses 2 and 3

Standard 2.5.4

The Editorial note following clause 4

Standard 2.5.5

The Editorial note following clause 3

Standard 2.5.6

The Editorial note following clause 3

Standard 2.5.7

The Editorial note following clause 4

Standard 2.6.2

The Editorial notes following clauses 7, 8 and 9

Standard 2.9.1

The Editorial notes appearing in the definitions in clause 1(2); the Editorial note following clause 7 and before the Table to that clause; the Editorial notes following the Table to clause 22 and the Table to clause 32

Standard 2.9.2

The Editorial notes following the definition of sugars in clause 1; the Editorial note following clauses 5, 10 and 11; the Editorial note following subclause 6(1)

Standard 2.10.1

The Editorial note following clause 2

Standard 3.1.1

The Editorial note following clause 3

Standard 3.2.1

The Editorial note following the definition of food safety auditor in clause 1; the Editorial notes following clauses 2 and 4

 

[2]          Standard 1.1.1 is varied by

 

[2.1]       omitting from Columns 2, 3 and 4 of the Schedule, the entries in relation to Folate, substituting

 

Folic acid

200 µg

100 µg

L-methyltetrahydrofolate, calcium

 

 

 

[2.2]       inserting in Column 2 of the Schedule, in the entry for Iron –

 

 

Ferric sodium edetate (This form of iron is not permitted to be added to breakfast cereals, as purchased under  Standard 1.3.2 and to formulated supplementary foods for young children as regulated in Standard 2.9.3.)

 

 

 

[3]          Standard 1.1A.2 is varied by inserting after paragraph (3)(e) –

 

(ea)        The reference to folate in the Table to subclause 3(e) excludes folate in the form of L-methyltetrahydrofolate, calcium.

 

[4]          The Editorial notes in Standard 1.1A.6 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following subclause 1(2), substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

The effect of subclause 1(2) is that additives permitted in formulated meal replacements are permitted in special purpose foods.  Subclause 1(2) exempts special purpose foods from the requirements for minimum levels for protein, kJ; and the minimum and maximum levels for vitamins and minerals.  The definition of formulated meal replacements is not intended to be taken literally in relation to special purpose foods.  i.e. special purpose foods are not necessarily intended as a meal replacement.

 

[5]          The Editorial notes in Standard 1.2.3 are varied by –

 

[5.1]       omitting the second and third paragraphs of the Editorial note following the Table to clause 2.

 

[5.2]       omitting the Editorial note following the Table to clause 4, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

1.       As an example, clause 4 can be complied with by listing those substances in the Table in the ingredient list.

2.       See Standard 1.2.4 – Labelling of Ingredients for the requirements for the labelling of ingredients, including sulphites.

3.       As an example, manufacturers may chose to indicate that a food contains one substance or another (e.g. brazil nuts or cashew nuts) in cases where substitutions occur regularly.

 

[6]          The Editorial notes in Standard 1.2.4 are varied by –

 

[6.1]       omitting the Editorial note following clause 1, substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.2.3 – Mandatory Warning and Advisory Statements and Declarations for the requirements to always declare the presence of certain substances.


[6.2]       omitting the Editorial note following clause 4 and before the Table to that clause, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

The term ‘common name’ does not have a technical meaning for the purposes of paragraph 4(a), and should be given its ordinary meaning.

 

[6.3]       omitting the Editorial note following clause 8, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

For the purposes of subclause 8(3), enzymes need only be declared by the class name ‘enzyme’ and not by specifically declaring the name of the enzyme.

 

An example for subclause 8(8) is where a manufacturer chooses to use preservative X for 6 months of the year and preservative Y for the rest of the year, one label may indicate that either preservative was used in the preparation, manufacture or handling of the food e.g.  preservative (X or Y) where X and Y may be expressed as either the additive’s specific name or code number, if any.

 

[7]          The Editorial notes in Standard 1.2.5 are varied by inserting, following the definition of baked-for date in clause 1 –

 

Editorial note:

 

For example, bread that is baked after midday on one day may have a ‘baked-for’ date for the following day.

 

[8]          The Editorial notes in Standard 1.2.6 is varied by omitting from the Editorial note following clause 3 –

 

packet

 

substituting –

 

package

 

[9]          The Editorial notes in Standard 1.2.8 are varied by –

 

[9.1]       omitting the first paragraph of the Editorial note following the Table to subclause 2(2)

 

[9.2]       omitting from the Editorial note following subclause 7(2) the Example Nutrition Information Panel, substituting –

 

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Servings per package: (insert number of servings)

Serving size: g (or mL or other units as appropriate)

 

Quantity per Serving

% Daily Intake* (per Serving)

Quantity per 100 g (or 100 mL)

 

Energy

 

kJ (Cal)

%

kJ (Cal)

Protein

 

g

%

g

Fat, total

   – saturated

 

g

g

 

%

%

g

g

Carbohydrate

   – sugars

 

g

g

%

%

g

g

Sodium

mg (mmol)

%

mg (mmol)

 

(insert any other nutrient or biologically active substance to be declared)

 

g, mg, mg (or other units as appropriate)

%

g, mg, mg (or other units as appropriate)

 

* Percentage Daily Intakes are based on an average adult diet of 8700 kJ. Your daily intakes may be higher or lower depending on your energy needs.

 

[9.3]       omitting the Editorial note following subclause 18(2), substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

For example, the dietary fibre content of a cereal bar with added inulin is calculated by adding the result of the analysis for total dietary fibre, using one of the two possible methods of analysis, to the result of the analysis for inulin, and subtracting from the total that part of the inulin content that was included in the result of the analysis for total dietary fibre.

 

See Standard 1.3.4 – Identity and Purity for the identity and purity requirements for added resistant maltodextrins.

 

[10]        The Editorial notes in Standard 1.2.10 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following subclause 2(4), substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

Cured and/or dried meat flesh in whole cuts or pieces is defined in Standard 2.2.1.

 

An example of a characterising component is milk fat in ice cream.

 

[11]        The Editorial notes in Standard 1.3.1 are varied by –

 

[11.1]     omitting the Editorial note following the definition of technological function in clause 1, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

The technological functions of food additives are listed in Schedule 5 of Standard 1.3.1. See Standard 1.2.4 – Labelling of Ingredients for the requirements for the declaration of ingredients, including for food additive class names.

 

[11.2]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 3, substituting –


Editorial note:

 

As a guide, the Codex Alimentarius Commission Procedural Manual sets out the following relevant criteria for use in assessing compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice:

 

(a)     the quantity of additive added to food shall be limited to the lowest possible level necessary to accomplish its desired effect;

(b)     the quantity of the additive that becomes a component of food as a result of its use in the manufacture, processing or packaging of a food and which is not intended to accomplish any physical, or other technical effect in the finished food itself, is reduced to the extent reasonably possible; and

(c)     the additive is prepared and handled in the same way as a food ingredient.

 

The manner in which a food is intended to be presented (e.g. by the use of such quality descriptors as natural, pure, traditional etc) may affect the type and level of food additives that could be used in accordance with GMP.  Similarly, the type and level of food additives used may affect the way in which a food may be presented.

 

[11.3]     omitting the Editorial Note following clause 4, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

Limits for specific intense sweeteners in specific foods are included in Schedule 1.  Some intense sweeteners are included in Schedule 2 and these sweeteners may be added to a food in accordance with Schedule 1 (i.e. where Schedule 2 additives may be present in a food).

 

The amount of an intense sweetener needed in a food would depend on the amount required:

 

1.       as a flavour enhancer in the food; or

2.       to wholly or partially replace the sweetness of sugars that would or could be present in the food.

 

Polyols, isomalt and polydextrose are examples of ingredients that are used as humectants or texturisers or as foods in their own right.

 

[11.4]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 11, substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

The Flavour and Fragrance Association of Australia and New Zealand (FFAANZ) has prepared a consolidated list of artificial flavouring substances in three publications.  This list is available from FFAANZ.

 

[12]        Standard 1.3.2 is varied by omitting from Column 3 of the Table to clause 3, under the heading Breakfast cereals, as purchased, the entry for Iron, substituting –

 

 

 

Iron – except ferric sodium edetate

 

 

 

[13]        The Editorial notes in Standard 1.3.3 are varied by


[13.1]     omitting the Editorial note following the Table to clause 12, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

FSANZ will review the extent of the use of Iodine as a processing aid three years from the date of the inclusion of Iodine as a processing aid in the Table to clause 12.

 

[13.2]     omitting the letter E from the heading of the Editorial note following clause 14.

 

[14]        Standard 1.3.4 is varied by omitting paragraph 2(a), substituting –

 

(a)          Combined Compendium of Food Additive Specifications, FAO JECFA Monograph 1 (2005) as superseded by specifications published in FAO JECFA Monographs 3 (2006) and FAO JECFA Monographs 4 (2007), Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations, Rome; or

 

[15]        Standard 1.4.2 is varied by

 

[15.1]     The Editorial notes in Standard 1.4.2 are varied by omitting the following heading in the Editorial notes after subclauses 4(3) and 4(4)

 

Sample calculation

 

substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

[15.2]     omitting from Schedule 1 all entries for the following chemical –

 

Dichlorprop

 

[15.3]     omitting from Schedule 1 the chemical residue definition for the chemical appearing in Column 1 of the Table to this sub-item, substituting the chemical residue definition appearing in Column 2

 

Column 1

Column 2

Acibenzolar-S-methyl

Acibenzolar-S-methyl and all metabolites containing the benzo[1,2,3]thiadiazole-7-carboxyl moiety hydrolysed to benzo[1,2,3]thiadiazole-7-carboxylic acid, expressed as acibenzolar-S-methyl

Boscalid

Commodities of plant origin:  Boscalid

Commodities of animal origin:  Sum of boscalid, 2-chloro-N-(4’-chloro-5-hydroxybiphenyl-2-yl) nicotinamide and the glucuronide conjugate of 2-chloro-N-(4’-chloro-5-hydroxybiphenyl-2-yl) nicotinamide, expressed as boscalid equivalents

Dimetridazole

Sum of dimetridazole and its hydroxy metabolite (2-hydroxymethyl-1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole), expressed as dimetridazole

Emamectin

Emamectin B1a, plus its 8,9-Z isomer and emamectin B1b, plus its 8,9-Z isomer

Fipronil

Sum of fipronil, the sulphenyl metabolite (5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl) sulphenyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile), the sulphonyl metabolite (5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl)sulphonyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile), and the trifluoromethyl metabolite (5-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile)

Indoxacarb

Sum of indoxacarb and its

R-isomer

 

[15.4]     inserting in Schedule 1–

 


Coumaphos

Sum of coumaphos and its oxygen analogue, expressed as coumaphos

Cattle fat

T0.2

Cattle kidney

T0.2

Cattle liver

T0.2

Cattle muscle

T0.2

 

 

Dichlorprop-P

sum of dichlorprop acid, its esters and conjugates, hydrolysed to dichlorprop acid, and expressed as dichlorprop acid

Citrus Fruits

0.2

Edible offal (mammalian)

*0.05

Eggs

*0.02

Meat (mammalian)

*0.02

Milks

*0.01

Poultry, edible offal of

*0.05

Poultry meat

*0.02

 

 

Milbemectin

Sum of milbemycin MA3 and milbemycin MA4 and their photoisomers, milbemycin (Z) 8,9-MA3 and (Z) 8,9Z-MA4

Strawberry

0.2

 

 

Prothioconazole

Commodities of plant origin:  Sum of prothioconazole and prothioconazole desthio (2-(1-chlorocyclopropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-ol), expressed as prothioconazole

Commodities of animal origin: Sum of prothioconazole, prothioconazole desthio (2-(1-chlorocyclopropyl)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-ol), prothioconazole-3-hydroxy-desthio (2-(1-chlorocyclopropyl)-1-(2-chloro-3-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-ol) and prothioconazole-4-hydroxy-desthio (2-(1-chlorocyclopropyl)-1-(2-chloro-4-hydroxyphenyl)-3-(1H-1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)-propan-2-ol), expressed as prothioconazole

Barley

T*0.05

Edible offal (mammalian)

T*0.05

Eggs

T*0.01

Meat (mammalian) (in the fat)

T*0.01

Milks

T*0.01

Poultry, edible offal of

T*0.05

Poultry meat (in the fat)

T*0.05

Wheat

T*0.05

 

 

Pyraflufen-ethyl

Sum of pyraflufen-ethyl and its acid metabolite (2-chloro-5-(4-chloro-5-difluoromethoxy-1-methylpyrazol-3-yl)-4-fluorophenoxyacetic acid)

Cereal grains

*0.02

Cotton seed

*0.05

Edible offal (mammalian)

*0.02

Eggs

*0.02

Meat (mammalian)

*0.02

Milks

*0.02

Poultry, edible offal of

*0.02

Poultry meat

*0.02

 

 

Pyrasulfotole

Sum of pyrasulfotole and (5-hydroxy-3-methyl-1H-pyrazol-4-yl)[2-mesyl-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]methanone, expressed as pyrasulfotole

Cereal bran, unprocessed

T0.03

Cereal grains

T*0.02

Edible offal (mammalian)

T0.5

Eggs

T*0.01

Meat (mammalian)

T*0.01

Milks

T*0.01

Poultry, edible offal of

T*0.01

Poultry meat

T*0.01

 

 

Tulathromycin

Sum of tulathromycin and its metabolites that are converted by acid hydrolysis to (2R,3S,4R,5R,8R,10R,11R,12S,13S,14R)-2-ethyl-3,4,10,13-tetrahydroxy-3,5,8,10,12,14-hexamethyl-11-[[3,4,6-trideoxy-3-(dimethylamino)-ß-D-xylohexopyranosyl]oxy]-1-oxa-6-azacyclopentadecan-15-one, expressed as tulathromycin equivalents

Cattle fat

0.1

Cattle kidney

1

Cattle liver

3

Cattle muscle

0.1

Pig kidney

3

Pig liver

2

Pig muscle

0.5

Pig skin/fat

0.3

 

 

 


[15.5]     omitting from Schedule 1 the foods and associated MRLs for each of the following chemicals

 


Azoxystrobin

Azoxystrobin

Mizuna

T10

 

 

Boscalid

Commodities of plant origin:  Boscalid

Commodities of animal origin:  Sum of Boscalid, 2-chloro-N-(4’-chloro-5-hydroxybiphenyl-2-yl) nicotinamide and glucuronide conjugate of 2-chloro-n-(4’-chloro-5-hydroxybiphenyl-2-yl) nicotinamide, expressed as boscalid equivalents

Strawberry

T5

 

 

Carbofuran

Sum of carbofuran and 3-hydroxycarbofuran, expressed as carbofuran

Banana

*0.1

Maize

*0.05

Sorghum

*0.05

Sweet corn (kernels)

*0.05

 

 

Chlorpyrifos

Chlorpyrifos

Vegetables [except as otherwise listed under this chemical]

T*0.01

 

 

Diuron

Sum of diuron and 3,4- dichloroaniline, expressed as diuron

Cattle, edible offal of

3

Cattle meat

0.1

Cattle milk

0.1

Field pea (dry)

*0.05

Pineapple

0.5

 

 

Indoxacarb

indoxacarb

Adzuki bean (dry)

T0.2

Chick-pea

0.2

Edible offal (mammalian)

*0.01

Mung bean (dry)

0.2

Soya bean (dry)

0.2

Soya bean oil, refined

0.2

 

 

Methomyl

Sum of methomyl and methyl hydroxythioacetimidate (‘methomyl oxime’), expressed as methomyl

see also thiodicarb

Leafy vegetables [except Chard]

1

 

 

Propiconazole

Propiconazole

Tree nuts

T0.2

 

 

Pyraclofos

Pyraclofos

Sheep meat

T*0.1

 

 

Pyriproxyfen

Pyriproxyfen

Cotton seed oil, edible

T*0.02

 

 

 


 


[15.6]     inserting in alphabetical order in Schedule 1, the foods and associated MRLs for each of the following chemicals

 


Abamectin

sum of avermectin b1a, avermectin b1b and (z)-8,9 avermectin b1a, and (z)-8,9 avermectin b1b

Goat fat

0.1

Goat kidney

0.01

Goat liver

0.05

Goat milk

0.005

Goat muscle

0.01

Passionfruit

T0.1

 

 

Acibenzolar-S-methyl

Sum of acibenzolar-S-methyl and Benzo[1,2,3]thiadiazole-7-carboxylic acid metabolite, expressed as acibenzolar-S-methyl

Edible offal (mammalian)

*0.02

Eggs

*0.02

Meat (mammalian)

*0.02

Milks

*0.005

Poultry, edible offal of

*0.02

Poultry meat

*0.02

 

 

Azoxystrobin

Azoxystrobin

Brassica leafy vegetables

T10

 

 

Bifenthrin

Bifenthrin

Poppy seed

*0.02

 

 

Carbofuran

Sum of carbofuran and 3-hydroxycarbofuran, expressed as carbofuran

Barley

0.2

 

 

Chlorpyrifos

Chlorpyrifos

Taro

0.05

Vegetables [except asparagus; brassica vegetables; cassava; celery; leek; peppers, sweet;  potato; swede; sweet  potato; taro and tomato]

T*0.01

 

 

Cloquintocet-mexyl

Sum of cloquintocet mexyl and 5-chloro-8-quinolinoxyacetic acid, expressed as cloquintocet mexyl

Rye

*0.1

Triticale

*0.1

 

 

Clothianidin

Commodities of plant origin:  Clothianidin

Commodities of animal origin:  Sum of clothianidin, 2-chlorothiazol-5-ylmethylguanidine, 2-chlorothiazol-5-ylmethylurea, and the pyruvate derivative of N-(2-chlorothiazol-5-ylmethyl)-N’-methylguanidine expressed as clothianidin

Apple

T0.5

Banana

T0.02

Nectarine

T2

Peach

T2

Pear

T0.5

 

 

Cyfluthrin

Cyfluthrin, sum of isomers

Pecan

T0.05

 

 

Diazinon

Diazinon

Coriander (leaves, stem, roots)

*0.05

Coriander, seed

*0.05

 

 

Difenoconazole

Difenoconazole

Celery

T2

Papaya (pawpaw)

T0.7

 

 

Dimethomorph

Sum of E and Z isomers of dimethomorph

Peas

1

 

 

Dimetridazole

 

Sum of dimetridazole and its hydroxy metabolite (2-hydroxymethyl-1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole), expressed as dimetridazole

 

Eggs

T*0.0001

 

 

 

 

Diuron

Sum of diuron and 3,4- dichloroaniline, expressed as diuron

Edible offal (mammalian)

3

Meat (mammalian)

0.1

Milks

0.1

Pulses

*0.05

 

 

Emamectin

Emamectin B1a, plus its 8,9-Z isomer and emamectin B1b, plus its 8,9-z isomer

Sweet corn (corn-on-the-cob)

*0.002

 

 

Fenitrothion

Fenitrothion

Oilseeds

T0.1

Pulses [except soya bean (dry)]

T0.1

 

 

Fipronil

Sum of fipronil, the sulphenyl metabolite (5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl) sulphenyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile),

the sulphonyl metabolite (5-amino-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-4-[(trifluoromethyl)sulphonyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile), and the trifluoromethyl

metabolite (5-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-1-[2,6-dichloro-4-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-1H-pyrazole-3-carbonitrile)

Grapes [except wine grapes]

T*0.01

 

 

Florasulam

Florasulam

Edible offal (mammalian)

*0.01

Eggs

*0.01

Meat (mammalian)

*0.01

Milks

*0.01

Poultry, edible offal of

*0.01

Poultry meat

*0.01

 

 

Fluquinconazole

Fluquinconazole

Barley

*0.02

 

 

Imidacloprid

Sum of imidacloprid and metabolites  containing the 6-chloropyridinylmethylene moiety, expressed as imidacloprid

Burdock, greater

T0.05

Ginger, Japanese

T5

Ginger, root

T0.05

Radish, Japanese

T0.05

Rhubarb

T1

Taro

T0.05

Yam bean

T0.05

Yams

T0.05

Indoxacarb

indoxacarb

Edible offal (mammalian) [except kidney]

*0.01

Kidney (mammalian)

0.2

Milk fats

1

Pulses

0.2

Rape seed

T*0.05

 

 

Iprodione

Iprodione

Brassica leafy vegetables

15

Carrot

T0.5

 

 

Methabenzthiazuron

Methabenzthiazuron

Shallot

T0.2

Spring onion

T0.2

 

 

Methomyl

Sum of methomyl and methyl hydroxythioacetimidate (‘methomyl oxime’), expressed as methomyl

see also thiodicarb

Leafy vegetables [except chard; lettuce, head and lettuce, leaf]

1

Lettuce, head

T2

Lettuce, leaf

T2

 

 

Nitroxynil

Nitroxynil

Cattle milk

T0.5

 

 

Oryzalin

Oryzalin

Ginger, root

T*0.05

 

 

Oxytetracycline

Inhibitory substance, identified as oxytetracycline

Prawns

0.2

 

 

Phosphorous acid

Phosphorous acid

Rhubarb

T100

 

 

Prometryn

Prometryn

Adzuki bean (dry)

T*0.1

 

 

Propiconazole

Propiconazole

Almonds

0.2

Tree nuts [except almonds]

T0.2

 

 

Pyraclofos

Pyraclofos

Sheep muscle

*0.01

 

 

Pyrimethanil

Pyrimethanil

Peppers, Sweet

T5

 

 

Pyriproxyfen

Pyriproxyfen

Citrus fruits

0.3

Coffee beans

0.1

Eggs

0.05

Mango

*0.01

Olive oil, crude

3

Olives

1

Passionfruit

0.1

Poultry, edible offal of

0.1

Poultry meat (in the fat)

0.1

 

 

Simazine

Simazine

Ginger, root

T*0.05

 

 

Tebuconazole

Tebuconazole

Carrot

T0.5

 

 

Tebufenpyrad

Tebufenpyrad

Cucumber

*0.02

 

 

Thiamethoxam

Commodities of plant origin:  Thiamethoxam

Commodities of animal origin:  Sum of thiamethoxam and N-(2-chloro-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)-N’-methyl-N’-nitro-guanidine, expressed as thiamethoxam

Tomato

*0.02

 

 

Trifloxystrobin

Sum of trifloxystrobin and its acid metabolite ((E,E)-methoxyimino-[2-[1-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)-ethylideneaminooxymethyl]phenyl] acetic acid), expressed as trifloxystrobin equivalents

Peppers, Sweet

T0.5

 

 

Trinexapac-ethyl

4-(cyclopropyl-a-hydroxy-methylene)-3,5-dioxo-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid

Edible offal (mammalian)

0.05

Meat (mammalian)

*0.02

Milks

*0.005

 

 


 

[15.7]     omitting from Schedule 1, under the entries for the following chemicals, the maximum residue limit for the food, substituting

 


Acibenzolar-S-methyl

Sum of acibenzolar-S-methyl and Benzo[1,2,3]thiadiazole-7-carboxylic acid metabolite, expressed as acibenzolar-S-methyl

Cotton seed

*0.02

 

 

Bifenthrin

Bifenthrin

Fruiting vegetables, cucurbits

0.1

 

 

Carbofuran

Sum of carbofuran and 3-hydroxycarbofuran, expressed as carbofuran

Cotton seed

0.1

Sunflower seed

 

0.1

 

Diazinon

Diazinon

Parsley

*0.05

 

 

Dimetridazole

Sum of dimetridazole and its hydroxy metabolite (2-hydroxymethyl-1-methyl-5-nitroimidazole), expressed as dimetridazole

Pig, edible offal of

T*0.0001

Pig meat

T*0.0001

Poultry, edible offal of

T*0.0001

Poultry meat

T*0.0001

 

 

Florasulam

Florasulam

Cereal grains

*0.01

 

 

Indoxacarb

indoxacarb

Meat (mammalian) (in the fat)

1

Milks

0.1

 

 

Methabenzthiazuron

Methabenzthiazuron

Leek

T*0.05

 

 

Permethrin

Permethrin, sum of isomers

Rhubarb

1

 

 

Pyraclofos

Pyraclofos

Sheep fat

0.5

Sheep kidney

*0.01

Sheep liver

*0.01

 

 

Pyrimethanil

Pyrimethanil

Banana

2

Tomato

T5

 

 

Pyriproxyfen

Pyriproxyfen

Cotton seed

*0.01

Cotton seed oil, crude

*0.02

Edible offal (mammalian)

*0.02

Fruiting vegetables, cucurbits

0.2

Fruiting vegetables, other than cucurbits

1

Meat (mammalian) (in the fat)

*0.02

Milks

*0.02

 

 

Tebuconazole

Tebuconazole

lettuce, head

0.1

Lettuce, leaf

0.1

 

 

Thiamethoxam

Commodities of plant origin:  Thiamethoxam

Commodities of animal origin:  Sum of thiamethoxam and N-(2-chloro-thiazol-5-ylmethyl)-N’-methyl-N’-nitro-guanidine, expressed as thiamethoxam

Citrus fruits

1

 

 

Trinexapac-ethyl

4-(cyclopropyl-a-hydroxy-methylene)-3,5-dioxo-cyclohexanecarboxylic acid

Sugar cane

0.1

 

 


 

[16]        The Editorial notes in Standard 1.5.1 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following the Table to clause 2, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.3.4 – Identity and Purity for identity and purity requirements for novel foods.

 

[17]        The Editorial notes in Standard 1.5.2 are varied by

 

[17.1]     omitting the boxed text following clause 5, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

An example for single ingredient genetically modified foods:

 

Soy Flour

Genetically Modified

 

Soy Flour

From genetically modified soya beans

 

An example for genetically modified food ingredients:

 

Ingredients: Soy Protein Isolate (genetically modified); Maltodextrin; Vegetable Oil; Food Acid (332); Emulsifier (471); Vegetable Gum (407); Water Added.

 

 

[17.2]     omitting the Editorial Note following clause 7, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See also the User Guide – Labelling Genetically Modified Food.

 

[18]        The Editorial notes in Standard 1.6.2 are varied by

 

[18.1]     omitting the Editorial note for New Zealand following clause 1, substituting


Editorial note for New Zealand:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Product Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[18.2]     omitting the third paragraph of the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Product Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[18.3]     omitting the Editorial note for New Zealand following clause 3, substituting

 

Editorial note for New Zealand:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for egg products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981.

 

[18.4]     omitting the Editorial note for New Zealand following clause 4, substituting

 

Editorial note for New Zealand:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for poultry are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981.

 

[18.5]     omitting the Editorial note for New Zealand following clause 8, substituting

 

Editorial note for New Zealand:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for fermented comminuted processed meats are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981.

 

[19]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.1.1 are varied by –

 

[19.1]     omitting the Editorial Note following clause 3, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

As an example, products are traditionally described by names such as ‘shortbread’, ‘soda bread’, ‘pita bread’ and ‘crispbread’.

 

See Standard 1.2.3 – Mandatory Warning and Advisory Statements and Declarations for requirements for declaring the presence of certain specified substances that must always be declared in the label of the food.

 

[19.2]     by omitting the Editorial note following clause 5, substituting –

 


Editorial note:

 

The intention of clause 5 is to require the replacement of non-iodised with iodised salt where it is used as an ingredient in the manufacture of bread.  The New Zealand Standard issued under section 11L of the New Zealand Food Act 1981 that adopts clause 5 limits the application of clause 5 to bread produced for the New Zealand domestic market only.

 

Clause 5 will be reviewed when sufficient monitoring data are available to assess the impact of this mandatory requirement.

 

Standard 2.10.2 sets out the compositional requirements for iodised salt.  The target level of iodine when manufacturing iodised salt for addition to bread ideally would be the mid-point of the iodisation range i.e. 45 mg of iodine per kilogram of salt.

 

[20]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.2.1 are varied by

 

[20.1]     omitting the Editorial note following the definition of meat in clause 1, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standards 2.2.2 – Egg and Egg Products and 2.2.3 – Fish and Fish Products, for the respective requirements for eggs or fish.  See Standard 1.2.4 – Labelling of Ingredients for ingredient labelling requirements.

 

[20.2]     inserting, following subclause 8(3)

 

Editorial note:

 

An example of referring to a heating process would be describing a product as ‘pasteurised’.

 

[20.3]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 9, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

An example of referring to a heating process would be describing a product as ‘pasteurised’.

 

[20.4]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 11, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

Clause 11 applies to Australia only.  Bovine products imported for sale in New Zealand are regulated by the New Zealand Food (Prescribed Foods) Standard 2007 and associated import requirements.

 

[21]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.2.3 are varied by

 

[21.1]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 1, substituting –

 


Editorial note:

 

In New Zealand, guidance may be found in the following publications:

 

1.       Scientific names of fish, approved under clause 32 of the Animal Products (Specifications for Products Intended for Human Consumption) Notice 2005

          http://www.nzfsa.govt.nz/animalproducts/legislation/notices/animal-material-product/human-consumption/nz-fishnames-list-web-published-20080128.pdf ; and

 

2.       Approved Scientific, New Zealand Common, Maori, and Foreign Common Names of New Zealand Commercial Fish Species, are available from the New Zealand Food Safety Authority website at http://www.nzfsa.govt.nz/animalproducts/registers-lists/approved-fish-names/

 

[21.2]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 3, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.2.1 – Application of Labelling and Other Information Requirements for the application of labelling requirements.

 

[21.3]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 3, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

An example of a process that alters the fatty acid composition of fatty acids in edible oil is the process of hydrogenation.

 

[22]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.1 are varied by inserting, following the Purpose –

 

Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[23]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.2 are varied by inserting, following the Purpose –

 

Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[24]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.3 are varied by inserting, following the Purpose –

 


Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[25]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.4 are varied by inserting, following the Purpose –

 

Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[26]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.5 are varied by inserting, following the Purpose –

 

Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[27]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.6 are varied by

 

[27.1]     inserting, following the Purpose –

 

Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[27.2]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.2.4 – Labelling of Ingredients for requirements for the declaration of animal fats or oils in ice cream.

 

[28]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.5.7 are varied by inserting, following the Purpose –

 

Editorial note:

 

For New Zealand purposes, processing requirements for milk and milk products are regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981, including the New Zealand Food (Milk and Milk Products Processing) Standard 2007.

 

[29]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.6.1 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 3, substituting

 


Editorial note:

 

See Part 1.2 – Labelling and Other Information Requirements of this Code for general labelling requirements.  See Standard 1.3.1 – Food Additives for limits for additives for fruit juice and vegetable juice.  See Standard 1.3.3 – Processing Aids for requirements for processing aids in the production of fruit juice and vegetable juice.

 

[30]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.6.4 are varied by –

 

[30.1]     omitting the Editorial note following subclause 2(1), substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.3.1 – Food Additives for the limits for food additives, other than caffeine, in formulated caffeinated beverages.

 

[30.2]     omitting from the Editorial Note following subclause 3(2) the Example Nutrition Information Panel, substituting

 

 

NUTRITION INFORMATION

Servings per package: (insert number of servings)

Serving size: 250 mL

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quantity per Serving

Quantity per 100 mL

 

 

Energy

kJ (Cal)

kJ (Cal)

 

 

Protein

g

g

 

 

Fat, total

        saturated

g

g

g

g

 

 

Carbohydrate, total

         sugars

g

g

g

g

 

 

Sodium

mg (mmol)

mg (mmol)

 

 

COMPOSITION INFORMATION

 

 

Caffeine

mg

mg

 

 

Thiamin

mg

mg

 

 

Riboflavin

mg

mg

 

 

Niacin

mg

mg

 

 

Vitamin B6

mg

mg

 

 

Vitamin B12

μg

μg

 

 

Pantothenic acid

mg

mg

 

 

Taurine

mg

mg

 

 

Glucuronolactone

mg

mg

 

 

Inositol

mg

mg

 

 

[31]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.7.2 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting –

 


Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.3.1 – Food Additives and Standard 1.3.3 – Processing Aids for the respective requirements for additives and processing aids.  See Standard 2.7.1 – Labelling of Alcoholic Beverages and Food containing Alcohol for specific labelling requirements for alcoholic beverages.

 

[32]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.7.3 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.3.1 – Food Additives and Standard 1.3.3 – Processing Aids for the respective requirements for additives and processing aids.  See Standard 2.7.1 – Labelling of Alcoholic Beverages and Food containing Alcohol for specific labelling requirements for alcoholic beverages.

 

[33]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.7.4 are varied by

 

[33.1]     omitting the Editorial note following the Purpose, substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

The New Zealand Geographical Indications (Wines and Spirits) Registration Act 2006 applies to geographical indications in relation to wine.  The Act will commence on a date to be proclaimed by the Governor-General of New Zealand.

 

[33.2]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 4.5.1 – Wine Production Requirements for requirements for the production of wine in Australia.  See Standard 1.3.1 – Food Additives and Standard 1.3.3 – Processing Aids for the respective requirements for additives and processing aids.  See Standard 2.7.1 – Labelling of Alcoholic Beverages and Food Containing Alcohol for specific labelling requirements for alcoholic beverages.

 

[34]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.7.5 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 4(2), substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 4.5.1 – Wine Production Requirements for requirements for the production of wine in Australia.  See Standard 1.3.1 – Food Additives and Standard 1.3.3 – Processing Aids for the respective requirements for additives and processing aids.  See Standard 2.7.1 – Labelling of Alcoholic Beverages and Food containing Alcohol for specific labelling requirements for alcoholic beverages.

 

[35]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.8.1 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting –


Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.2.4 – Labelling of Ingredients for requirements for labelling of ‘sugars’ as an ingredient.

 

[36]        Standard 2.9.1 is varied by

 

[36.1]     inserting, following subclause 1(2) –

 

Editorial note:

 

Subclause 1(2) is structured to indicate that the definitions of specific infant formula products are within the more general ‘infant formula product’ definition. Therefore the usual practice of listing definitions in alphabetical order has not been applied in this subclause.

 

[36.2]     inserting, following clause 16 –

 

Editorial note:

 

As a guide to how nutrition information may be presented, see the Guidelines for Infant Formula Products at the end of this Standard.  These Guidelines do not form part of the legally binding Standard.

 

[36.3]     omitting the Editorial note following clause 17, substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

The full range of climatic conditions that exist in Australia and New Zealand may need to be considered when determining valid and appropriate storage instructions.

 

[37]        Standard 2.9.3 is varied by omitting from Column 1 of Table 3, in the Schedule, the entry for Iron, substituting –

 

Iron – except ferric sodium edetate for formulated supplementary foods for young children

 

 

 

 

 

[38]        The Editorial notes in Standard 2.10.2 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 5, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

See Standard 1.2.8 – Nutrition Information Requirements for requirements where a claim is made in relation to the sodium content of foods to which reduced sodium salt mixtures or salt substitutes have been added.

 

[39]        The Editorial notes in Standard 3.2.3 are varied by

 


[39.1]     omitting the Editorial note following the definition of potable water in clause 1, substituting –

 

 

Editorial note:

 

The 2004 Australian Drinking Water Guidelines (ADWG) are available from the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC).

 

[39.2]     omitting the Editorial note following subclause 2(3), substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

Standards Australia has published AS 4674-2004 Design, Construction and Fit-out of Food Premises.  This Standard provides guidance on design, construction and fit-out criteria for new food premises and for the renovation or alteration of existing food premises.

 

[40]        The Editorial notes in Standard 3.3.1 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 2, substituting

 

Editorial note:

 

‘Act’ is defined in Standard 1.1.1 as meaning the Act under the authority of which the Code is applied.

 

[41]        The Editorial notes in Standard 4.2.1 are varied by omitting the Editorial note following clause 3, substituting –

 

Editorial note:

 

Examples of ‘controls’ referred to in this clause could include –

 

(a)          measures to control hazards from air, soil, water, bait and feedstuffs, fertilisers (including natural fertilisers), pesticides, veterinary drugs and any other agent used in primary production of seafood; and

 

(b)          controls to protect food sources from faecal and other contamination.

 

[42]        The Editorial notes in Standard 4.2.3 are varied by omitting the Editorial note for New Zealand following clause 5, substituting –

 

Editorial note for New Zealand:

 

For New Zealand the processing of UCFM is regulated under the Animal Products Act 1999 and the Food Act 1981.

 

[43]        The Editorial notes in Standard 4.2.4 are varied by omitting from the Editorial note following subclause 15(3) –

 

paragraph 14(3)(b)


substituting –

 

paragraph 15(3)(b)

 

[44]        The Editorial notes in Standard 4.2.4A are varied by omitting from the Editorial note following the Table to clause 1

 

paragraph 3(2)(a) of Standard 4.2.4

 

substituting

 

paragraph 2(1)(a) of Standard 1.6.2 before 5 October 2008 and then with paragraphs 16(a) and (b) of Standard 4.2.4 after 5 October 2008