Federal Register of Legislation - Australian Government

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Lists as made
This instrument includes 2 ecological communities in the critically endangered category, 5 ecological communities in the endangered category, 1 ecological community in the vulnerable category and deletes 1 ecological community from the endangered caterogy.
Administered by: Environment
Made 12 Oct 2007
Registered 24 Oct 2007
Tabled HR 12 Feb 2008
Tabled Senate 12 Feb 2008
Date of repeal 17 Mar 2015
Repealed by Spent and Redundant Instruments Repeal Regulation 2015 (No. 1)

 

Commonwealth of Australia

 

Inclusion of ecological communities in the list of threatened ecological communities under section 181 of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 

 

I, MALCOLM BLIGH TURNBULL, Minister for the Environment and Water Resources, hereby amend the list referred to in section 181 of that Act by:

 

including in the list in the critically endangered category:

·        Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b), as described in the Schedule to this instrument; and

·        Swamps of the Fleurieu Peninsula, as described in the Schedule to this instrument;

 

including in the list in the endangered category:

·               Semi-evergreen Vine Thickets of the Brigalow Belt (North and South) and Nandewar Bioregions;

·               Shale/Sandstone Transition Forest;

·               The community of native species dependent on natural discharge of groundwater from the Great Artesian Basin;

·               Bluegrass (Dichanthium spp.) dominant grasslands of the Brigalow Belt Bioregions (North and South); and

·               Brigalow (Acacia harpophylla dominant and co-dominant);

 

including in the list in the vulnerable category:

·               Eucalyptus ovata – Callitris oblonga Forest, as described in the Schedule to this instrument;

 

deleting from the list in the endangered category:

·               Semi-evergreen Vine Thickets of the Brigalow Belt South Bioregion in New South Wales.

 

 

 

 

Dated this…............12th .........................day of…................October.................................2007

 

 

 

 

Malcolm Bligh Turnbull

 

Minister for the Environment and Water Resources

 


SCHEDULE

 

 

Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b)

 

Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b) is found on highly fertile basalt-derived soils, in the moist lowlands, foothills and uplands on the Atherton Tablelands in the Wet Tropics Bioregion of northern Queensland.  A remnant patch is also located at Shiptons Flat, near Cooktown. Annual rainfall in this area varies between 1300 and 1600 mm.  The ecological community is heterogeneous within and between remnant patches, due to the influence of position in the landscape, local topography, and drainage.

 

Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b) is characterised by an uneven canopy (25-45m) with many tree layers.  Most trees have a deep crown, often extending down to between the top-third and top-half of the trunk.  As a result of the greater depth of crown, Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b) is distinctly different from nearby simple notophyll vine forests that only have shallow crowns with few layers.

 

The description of the ecological community is based on leaf size of the component vegetation: notophylls are plants with leaf size between 20.25–45 cm2, microphyllic plants have leaf sizes between 2.25–20.25 cm2, while mesophyllic plants have leaf sizes between 45–180 cm2

 

Notophylls (with some microphylls), are most common in the canopy of Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b), with mesophylls frequently found in the lower layers.  These notophylls are commonly semi-evergreen, and undergo heavy leaf fall during times of moisture stress.  The canopy also contains scattered deciduous trees.  The trunks of trees in this ecological community are uneven in size, and plank buttresses are a common feature in remnant or mature patches.  Woody vines are generally conspicuous. Epiphytes are rare, but where they do occur, they are high in the branches, with only scattered epiphytes being found lower down.  A prominent medium to dense shrub and scrambling vine understorey occurs beneath the tall canopy, and is a unique and distinguishing feature of this forest type.  The shrub/vine layer is generally only 1-3 metres high.  A list of characteristic plant species given below.

                                              


Mabi Forest (Complex Notophyll Vine Forest 5b) is characterised by the following plant species.  The total flora species list for the ecological community is considerably larger than that given below, with many species present at only some sites, or in very low densities.  Species may be present in the ecological community either in the seed bank, or as above-ground individuals.  Not every species will be present at every site, and the species composition of the remnant patches will be influenced by patch-size, recent environmental conditions, local disturbance history, and site-specific geographic and topographic locations.

 

Stratum

Species*

Common Name/s

Canopy

Aleurites moluccana

Candlenut Tree   

 

Alstonia scholaris

White Cheesewood, Milky Pine, Whitewood

 

Argyrodendron peralatum

Red Tulip Oak, Tulip Oak

 

Castanospermum australe

Black Bean, Moreton Bay Chestnut, Bean Tree

 

Diploglottis cunninghamii

Tamarind

 

Elaeocarpus grandis

Blue Quandong, Silver Quandong, Blue Fig, White Quandong, Cooloon, Blueberry Ash, Blue Fig

 

Ficus virens

White Fig

 

Ficus obliqua

Small-leaved Moreton Bay Fig, Small-leaved Fig

 

Melia azedarach

White Cedar, Tulip Cedar, Bead Tree, Persian Lilac, Wyndet

 

Myristica muelleri

Native Nutmeg

 

Terminalia sericocarpa

Damson, Sovereignwood

 

Toona australis

Red Cedar

Subcanopy

Acronychia acidula           

Lemon Wood

 

Aglaia sapindina

 

 

Alangium villosum subsp polyosmoides

Muskwood, Black Muskheart

 

Arytera divaricata

Coogera, Gap Axe, Rose Tamarind

 

Cupaniopsis tomentella (V)

Boonah Tuckeroo

 

Daphnandra dielsii

 

 

Euodia bonwickii

 

Understorey

Codiaeum variegatum

 

 

Hodgkinsonia frutescens (V)

Atherton Turkey Bush

 

Phaleria octandra

 

 

Sauropus macranthus (V)

 

Lianes (vines)

Cissus antarctica

Water-vine

 

Cissus repens

 

 

Connarus conchocarpus

 

 

Cudrania cochinchinensis

 

 

Elaeagnus latifolia

 

 

Embelia australiana

 

 

Melodinus australis

Southern Melodinus

 

Melodinus baccellianus

 

 

Ripogonum album

White Supplejack

 

Smilax australis

Austral Sarsaparilla, Barbed-wire Vine

 

Tylophora benthamii

Coast Tylophora

Epiphytes

Platycerium bifurcatum

Elkhorn, Elkhorn Fern

 

Platycerium superbum

Staghorn, Staghorn Fern

 

Asplenium nidus

Bird's-nest Fern

 

* V = listed as a vulnerable species under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 


Swamps of the Fleurieu Peninsula

 

The Swamps of the Fleurieu Peninsula are confined to the IBRA region “Lofty Block”. They are limited to the local catchment areas of Tookayerta, Hindmarsh, Parawa, Myponga, Yankalilla, Onkparinga, Currency Creek and Finniss.

 

The Swamps of the Fleurieu Peninsula are localised wetlands occurring in high rainfall areas. They are densely vegetated and occur adjacent to waterlogged soils around low-lying creeks and flats. The swamps are typified by their reedy or heathy vegetation growing on peat, silt, peat silt, or black clay soils.

 

The Swamps of the Fleurieu Peninsula ecological community is characterised by the following plant species. The total flora species list for the ecological community is considerably larger than that given below, with many species present at only some sites, or in very low densities. Species may be present in the ecological community either in the seed bank, or as above-ground individuals. Not every species will be present at every site, and the species composition of the remnant patches will be influenced by patch-size, recent environmental conditions, local disturbance history, and site-specific geographic and topographic locations.

 

Species *

Common name/s

Baurnea rubiginosa

Soft Twigrush

Baumea tetragona

Square Twigrush

Carex appressa

 

Centrolepis fascicularis

Bristlewort

Deyeuxia quadriseta

 

Drosera binata

Forked Sundew

Eleocharis gracilis

 

Einpodisma minus

Spreading Rope Rush

Euphrasia collina subsp. osbornii (E)

Osbom’s Eyebright

Gahnia sieberiana

Sword Grass, Sawsedge

Gleichenia microphylla

Scrambling Coral-fern, Coral-fern, Umbrella Fern

Goodenia ovata

Hop Goodenia

Isolepis inundata

 

Lepidosperma longitudinale

Pithy Swordsedge

Leptospermum continentale

Prickly Tea-tree

Leptospermum lanigerum

Woolly Tea-tree

Patersonia occidentalis

 

Prasophyilum frenchii (E)

Maroon Leek-orchid, Slaty Leek-orchid, Stout
Leek-orchid, French’s Leek-orchid

Schoenus carsei

Wiry Bog Rush

Sprengelia incarnata

Pink Swamp-heath

Viminaria juncea

Golden Spray, Native Broom

Xyris operculata

 

 

* E listed as an endangered species under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.


Eucalyptus ovataCallitris oblonga Forest

 

The Eucalyptus ovata – Callitris oblonga Forest ecological community is a type of Eucalyptus forest with a shrubby understorey. This ecological community is characterised by:

·        a Eucalyptus overstorey, typically made up of E. ovata, but in some areas it may be made up of by E. viminalis or E. amygdalina (Harris & Kirkpatrick 1991a; Zacharek 2000);

·        a midstorey of Callitris oblonga subsp. oblonga; and,

·        a shrubby understorey, of which Bursaria spinosa, Melaleuca gibbosa and Acacia dealbata are common components.

The ecological community is characterised by the association of Eucalyptus ovata and Callitris oblonga, and occurs in riparian (riverine) habitats. On alluvial flats the ecological community generally forms shrubby woodland, often in association with Melaleuca gibbosa. On rocky slopes this ecological community may lose its Eucalyptus overstorey due to topographical and soil factors, and form tall open shrubland with Callistemon pallidus. On rocky slopes, C. oblonga may therefore be the sole dominant, or co-dominant with eucalypts. Callitris oblonga is likely to be less dominant or co-dominant on the alluvial flats, where eucalypts, particularly E. ovata, become more dominant (Harris & Kirkpatrick 1991a).

This ecological community can vary in structure, for example it may occur as riparian forest, riparian scrub or as forest with a grassy understorey, reflecting a combination of the small-scale variations in topographic and disturbance effects of the riparian environment. The ecological community’s composition has been degraded in some places and its structure has often been modified; the shrub layer may be absent due to overgrazing or Callitris oblonga absent due to frequent fire. Weeds also heavily infest some patches (Zacharek 2000).

There are some isolated remnants from which Callitris oblonga has been excluded, by fire or other disturbance. The absence of C. oblonga in these remnants is an index of the level of degradation of the ecological community. As a key species Callitris oblonga plays an important role in the ecological community, and its loss affects the habitat for other species. Remnants in which this species is absent are therefore considered degraded to such an extent that they are no longer part of the listed ecological community.

The most common and characteristic flora species of this ecological community, plus listed threatened flora associated with it, are listed in Table 1. Table 2 provides a list of fauna species recorded within the ecological community.

 


Table 1. Characteristic native plant species of the Eucalyptus ovata – Callitris oblonga Forest ecological community. Not every species will be present at all locations. This list is not comprehensive, and does not include all plant species found in the ecological community.

 

Stratum

Species

Common name

Large trees

Eucalyptus ovata

Eucalyptus viminalis

Black Gum, Swamp Gum

White Gum, Ribbon Gum

Small trees – large shrubs

Callitris oblonga

Allocasuarina verticillata

Bursaria spinosa

Acacia dealbata

Banksia marginata

Pomaderris apetala

Acacia verticillata

Callistemon pallidus

Leptospermum lanigerum

Melaleuca ericifolia

Acacia mucronata

Notelaea ligustrina

Beyeria viscosa

Melaleuca pustulata

South Esk Pine

Drooping Sheoak

Blackthorn

Silver Wattle

Silver Banksia

Dogwood, Hazel Pomaderris

Prickly Moses

Lemon Bottlebrush

Woolly Tea-tree

Swamp Paperbark

Variable Sallow Wattle

Privet Mock-olive

Pinkwood

 

Small – medium shrubs

Melaleuca gibbosa

Leptospermum scoparium

Hibbertia riparia

Epacris impressa

Micrantheum hexandrum

Dodonaea viscosa

Coprosma quadrifida

Hakea microcarpa

Slender Honey-myrtle

Manuka

Stream Guinea-flower

Common Heath

Box Micrantheum

Sticky Hop-bush

Prickly Currant-bush

Small-fruited Needlebush

Ground layer

Lomandra longifolia

Poa labillardierei

Bossiaea prostrata

Schoenus apogon

Lepidosperma elatius

Acaena novae-zelandiae

Gonocarpus tetragynus

Astroloma humifusum

Gonocarpus micranthus

Spiny-headed Mat-rush

Tussock Grass

Creeping Bossiaea

Fluke Bogrush

 

Bidgee-widgee, Biddy Biddy

 

Native Cranberry

 

 


Table 2. Fauna species associated with Eucalyptus ovata - Callitris oblonga Forest ecological community. Not every species will be present at all locations. This list is not comprehensive, and does not include all fauna species found in the ecological community.

 

Class

Species

Common Name

Gastropods

Beddomeia krybetes

St Pauls Hydrobiid Snail

Insects

Anapheis java

Antipodia chaostola leucophaea

Costora delora

Lingora aurata

 

Chaostola Skipper

Amphibians

Crinia signifera

Crinia tasmaniensis

Limnodynastes dumerili

Litoria ewingi

Brown Froglet

Tasmanian Froglet

Banjo Frog

Brown Tree Frog

Mammals

Antechinus minimus minimus

Antechinus swainsonii swainsonii

Bettongia gaimardi

Dasyurus maculatus maculatus

Dasyurus viverrinus

Macropus rufogriseus rufogriseus

Ornithorhynchus anatinus

Potorous tridactylus apicalis

Pseudocheirus peregrinus viverrinus

Sarcophilus harrisii

Tachyglossus aculeatus

Thylogale billardierii

Trichosurus vulpecula fuliginosus

Vombatus ursinus tasmaniensis

Tasmanian Swamp Antechinus

Tasmanian Dusky Antechinus

Tasmanian Bettong

Spotted-tail Quoll

Eastern Quoll

Bennetts Wallaby

Platypus

Long-Nosed Potoroo

Common Ringtail Possum

Tasmanian Devil

Echidna

Tasmanian Pademelon

Brushtail Possum

Common Wombat

Birds

Acanthiza chrysorrhoa

Acanthiza ewingii

Acanthiza pusilla

Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris

Accipiter cirrhocephalus cirrhocephalus

Accipiter fasciatus fasciatus

Aegotheles cristatus tasmanicus

Alauda arvensis

Anas castanea

Anas gracilis gracilis

Anas superciliosa superciliosa

Anthochaera chrysoptera tasmanica

Anthochaera paradoxa

Anthus novaeseelandiae

Aquila audax fleayi

Ardea novaehollandiae

Artamus cyanopterus cyanopterus

Biziura lobata

Cacomantis flabelliformis prionuris

Calyptorhynchus funereus xanthanotus

Charadrius bicinctus

Charadrius ruficapillus

Chrysococcyx basalis

Chrysococcyx lucidus plagosus

Cinclosoma punctatum dovei

Circus approximans gouldi

Colluricincla harmonica harmonica

Coracina novaehollandiae

Corvus tasmanicus tasmanicus

Coturnix ypsilophora ypsilophorus

Cracticus torquatus cinereus

Cuculus pallidus

Cygnus atratus

Dacelo novaeguineae novaeguineae

Egretta alba

Emblema bella

Ephthianura albifrons

Falco berigora tasmanica

Fulica atra australis

Gallinula mortierii

Glossopsitta concinna

Neophema chrysostoma

Gymnorhina tibicen hypoleuca

Haliastur sphenurus

Hirundapus caudacutus

Hirundo neoxena

Hirundo nigricans nigricans

Lichenostomus flavicollus

Malurus cyaneus cyaneus

Manorina melanocephala melanocephala

Melanodryas vittata

Melithreptus affinis

Melithreptus validirostris

Myiagra cyanoleuca

Ninox novaeseelandiae leucopsis

Pachycephala pectoralis

Pardalotus punctatus

Pardalotus striatus striatus

Petroica multicolor boodang

Petroica phoenicea

Phaps chalcoptera

Phaps elegans

Phylidonyris melanops crassirostris

Phylidonyris novaehollandiae

Phylidonyris pyrrhoptera

Platycercus caledonicus

Platycercus eximius diemenensis

Podargus strigoides strigoides

Poliocephalus poliocephalus

Porphyrio porphyrio melanotus

Rhipidura fuliginosa albiscapa

Sericornis humilis

Strepera fuliginosa

Strepera versicolor arguta

Tadorna tadornoides

Thinornis rubricollis

Vanellus miles novaehollandiae

Vanellus tricolor

Zosterops lateralis lateralis

Yellow-Rumped Thornbill

Tasmanian Thornbill

Brown Thornbill King Island

Eastern Spinebill

Collared Sparrowhawk

Brown Goshawk

Australian Owlet-Nightjar

Common Skylark

Chestnut Teal

Grey Teal

Pacific Black Duck

Little Wattlebird

Yellow Wattle Bird

Richards Pipit

Wedge-tailed Eagle

White-faced Heron

Dusky Wood-Swallow

Musk Duck

Fan-tailed Cuckoo

Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoo

Double-banded Plover

Red-capped Plover

Horsfields Bronze-Cuckoo

Shining Bronze-Cuckoo

Spotted Quail-Thrush

Swamp Harrier

Grey Shrike-Thrush

Black-Faced Cuckoo-Shrike

Forest Raven

Brown Quail

Grey Butcherbird

Pallid Cuckoo

Black Swan

Laughing Kookaburra

Great Egret

Beautiful Firetail

White-Fronted Chat

Brown Falcon (Tasmanian)

Eurasian Coot

Tasmanian Native Hen

Musk Lorikeet

Blue-winged Parrot

Australian Magpie (white-backed subsp.)

Whistling Kite

White-throated Needletail

Welcome Swallow

Tree Martin

Yellow-throated Honeyeater

Superb Fairy Wren

Noisy Miner

Dusky Robin

Black-headed Honeyeater

Strong-billed Honeyeater

Satin Flycatcher

Southern Boobook (Tasmanian)

Golden Whistler

Spotted Pardalote

Striated Pardalote

Scarlet Robin

Flame Robin

Common Bronzewing

Brush Bronzewing

Tawny-crowned Honeyeater

New Holland Honeyeater

Crescent Honeyeater

Green Rosella

Eastern Rosella (Tasmanian)

Tawny Frogmouth

Hoary-headed Grebe

Purple Swamphen

Grey Fantail

White-browed Scrub Wren

Black Currawong

Grey Currawong (Clinking)

Australian Shelduck

Hooded Plover

Masked Lapwing

Banded Lapwing

Silvereye

Reptiles

Niveoscincus ocellatus

Niveoscincus pretiosus

Ocellated Skink

Tasmanian Tree Skink

Freshwater fish

Anguilla australis

Prototroctes maraena

Galaxias fontanus

Short-finned Eel

Australian Grayling

Swan Galaxias