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Order No. 1 of 2007 Orders/Marine as made
This Marine Order gives effect to regulations 2, 6 and 7 of Chapter VI to the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes (BC Code) referred to in Chapter VI, and to Chapter VII Part A-1 of the The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) 1974, and generally makes provision for the loading, stowing, carriage and unloading of solid bulk cargoes.
Administered by: Infrastructure and Regional Development
General Comments: This Marine Order was originally made under subsection 425(1AA) of the Navigation Act 1912 and has effect, for the purposes of the Navigation Act 2012, with such modifications as are specified in Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013 (see section 343 of the Navigation Act 2012 and Schedule 19 of Marine Order 4 (Transitional modifications) 2013).
Made 03 Jan 2007
Registered 05 Jan 2007
Tabled HR 06 Feb 2007
Tabled Senate 06 Feb 2007
Date of repeal 01 Jan 2017
Repealed by Marine Order 34 (Solid bulk cargoes) 2016

MARINE ORDERS

Part 34

Solid bulk cargoes

Issue 6

 

 

 

Order No. 1 of 2007

Pursuant to subsection 425(1AA) of the Navigation Act 1912, I hereby make this Order repealing Marine Orders Part 34, Issue 5, and issuing the attached Marine Orders, Part 34, Issue 6, to come into operation on 1 February 2007.

 

 

Clive Davidson

Chief Executive Officer

3 January 2007


Table of Contents

 

1       Purpose & power

2       Definitions of words and phrases used in this Part

3       Interpretation

4       Application

5       Exemptions & equivalents

6       Review of decisions

7       Notice of intention to ship solid bulk cargo

8       Information for master

9       Medical guide

10     Cargoes which may liquefy

11     Loading, stowage, carriage and unloading of solid bulk cargoes

12     Unsafe or inadequate arrangements

13     Inspections and additional tests

14     Allowable shear forces & bending moments

15     Incidents at sea involving dangerous cargoes

Appendix  Amplification of the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes

 

 

 

 

Previous issues

Issue 1, Order No. 6 of 1987
Issue 2, Order No. 7 of 1992
Issue 3, Order No. 3 of 1997
Issue 4, Order No. 18 of 1998
Issue 5, Order No. 7 of 2003

 


1  Purpose & power

1.1  Purpose

This Part of Marine Orders:

(a)  gives effect to:

(i)    Regulations 2, 6 and 7 of Chapter VI of SOLAS, dealing with the carriage of solid bulk cargo (other than grain);

(ii)    the BC Code referred to in Chapter VI of SOLAS; and

(iii)   Chapter VII, Part A-1 of SOLAS, dealing with the carriage of dangerous goods in solid form in bulk; and

(b) generally makes provision for the loading, stowing, carriage and unloading of solid bulk cargoes.

1.2  Power

1.2.1  Section 191 of the Navigation Act provides that the regulations may make provision for or in relation to giving effect to SOLAS.

1.2.2  Section 257 of the Navigation Act provides that the regulations may make provision for or in relation to giving effect to the loading, stowing or carriage in ships of cargo, or for the unloading of cargo from ships.[1]

1.2.3  Subsection 425(1) of the Navigation Act provides for regulations to be made prescribing matters required or permitted to be prescribed, or which are necessary or convenient to be prescribed for carrying out or giving effect to the Act.

1.2.4  Section 425(1AA) of the Navigation Act provides for the making of orders with respect to matters that can be made by the regulations.

2  Definitions of words and phrases used in this Part

AMSA means the Australian Maritime Safety Authority established by the Australian Maritime Safety Authority Act 1990;

BC Code means the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes 2004, 2005 Edition, published by IMO, as amplified by the Appendix to this Part;

General Manager means the person occupying the position of General Manager, Maritime Operations, in AMSA;

IMDG Code means the International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code as defined in Marine Orders, Part 41;

IMO means the International Maritime Organization;

Manager, Ship Inspections, means the person occupying the position of Manager, Ship Inspections, in AMSA or, in respect of any particular purpose under this Part, a suitably qualified person authorised by the Manager, Ship Inspections, for that purpose;

Navigation Act means the Navigation Act 1912;

operator means the owner of the ship or any other organisation or person such as the manager, or the bareboat charterer, who has assumed the responsibility for operation of the ship from the owner of the ship and who on assuming such responsibility has agreed to take over all duties and responsibilities imposed by the International Safety Management Code;

penal provision means a penal provision for the purposes of Regulation 4 of the Navigation (Orders) Regulations;[2]

SOLAS means the Safety Convention as defined in the Navigation Act;

solid bulk cargo, for the purposes of this Part, excludes grain but includes slurry;

surveyor means a person appointed as a surveyor under section 190 of the Navigation Act;

terminal representative means a person appointed by the terminal or other facility, where the ship is loading or unloading, who has responsibility for operations conducted by that terminal or facility with regard to the particular ship.[3]

3  Interpretation

3.1  In this Part, unless otherwise provided or unless the context otherwise requires, words and phrases have the same meaning as they have in Chapter VI of SOLAS, Chapter VII of SOLAS or the BC Code, as appropriate.

3.2  In this Part, a reference to the physical or chemical characteristics of a material means the physical or chemical characteristics in the 'as provided for shipment' condition of that material.

3.3  A reference in the BC Code to the competent authority is to be taken to mean the Manager, Ship Inspections.

3.4  A reference in Chapter VI of SOLAS to the Administration is to be taken to mean, in relation to a ship registered in Australia, the Manager, Ship Inspections.

3.5  In this Part:

(a)  headings and sub-headings are part of the Part;

(b) the Appendix is part of the Part; and

(c) a footnote is not part of the Part, but may provide additional information or guidance in applying the Part.

4  Application

4.1  This Part applies to the loading, stowing, carriage and unloading of solid bulk cargoes in:

(a)  a ship registered in Australia; and

(b) a ship registered in a country other than Australia, that is in the territorial sea of Australia or in waters on the landward side of the territorial sea.

5  Exemptions & equivalents[4]

5.1  Exemptions

The Manager, Ship Inspections will, upon written request, if satisfied that compliance with a requirement of the BC Code or other provision of this Part would in a particular case be unreasonable or impracticable, allow exemption in relation to a ship or a cargo from compliance with such requirement or provision to such extent and subject to such conditions as that officer determines.

5.2  Equivalents

If a provision of the BC Code or other provision of this Part requires a particular fitting, material, appliance or apparatus or type thereof to be fitted or carried in a ship, or particular provision to be made in relation to a ship or its equipment or in relation to a cargo, the Manager, Ship Inspections, may, upon written request, allow a modification or variation of that requirement if satisfied that the fitting, material, appliance or apparatus or type thereof or other provision so allowed is at least as effective as that required by the BC Code or this Part.

5.3  Exemptions and equivalents not to contravene SOLAS

The Manager, Ship Inspections, must not give an exemption under 5.1 or allow an equivalent under 5.2 if it would contravene SOLAS.

6  Review of decisions

6.1  Internal review

6.1.1  If the Manager, Ship Inspections, makes a decision under this Part, a person affected by the decision may, within 3 months of the date of notification of the decision or such longer period as determined by the General Manager, apply to the General Manager for review of that decision.

6.1.2  An application for internal review under 6.1.1 must be made in writing to the General Manager and must be accompanied by such information as the General Manager requires to enable the decision to be properly reviewed.

6.1.3  The General Manager may:

(a)  affirm the original decision by the Manager, Ship Inspections; or

(b) make any decision that could be made by the Manager, Ship Inspections, in accordance with this Part.

6.1.4  The General Manager must give his or her decision in writing within 28 days of receiving the application for internal review.

6.2  Review by the AAT

6.2.1  Application may be made to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal for review of a decision by the General Manager under 6.1.3.

6.2.2  The notice of a decision by the General Manager under 6.1.4 must include a statement to the effect that, if the person is dissatisfied with the decision, application may, subject to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975, be made to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal for review of the decision.  The notice must also include a statement to the effect that the person may request a statement under section 28 of that Act.

6.2.3  Failure to comply with 6.2.2 in relation to a decision does not affect the validity of that decision.

7  Notice of intention to ship solid bulk cargo

7.1  At least 48 hours before commencing to load into a ship a solid bulk cargo referred to in Appendix 1 of the BC Code, at a port in Australia, the operator, master or agent of the ship must furnish to the surveyor at the AMSA office at or nearest to the port of loading, a signed notice containing details of:

Ship information

(a)  the name and IMO number of the ship;

(b) the port and berth of loading;

Cargo information

(c) the Bulk Cargo Shipping Name (BCSN);

(d) for dangerous cargoes in Group B, the IMO class, except for materials hazardous only in bulk (MHB);

(e)  the UN number, preceded by the letters ‘UN’, for dangerous cargoes in Group B;

(f)  the approximate quantity of the cargo to be loaded;

(g) the shipper of the cargo; and

(h) the density of the cargo (if the density is 1780 kg/m3 or more),

unless the surveyor allows a shorter period of notice.[5]

7.2  If dangerous goods in solid form in bulk are to be shipped, notice must comply with Regulation 7-2.2 of Chapter VII of SOLAS.

7.3  The master must not permit solid bulk cargo to be loaded onto the ship until notice has been provided in accordance with 7.1.

This is a penal provision

8  Information for master

8.1  Nature of material

8.1.1  Before commencement of loading of a solid bulk cargo at a port in Australia, the shipper of that cargo must provide to the master or the master’s representative, in writing, details specified by the BC Code of the characteristics and properties of the cargo relevant to its safe and efficient carriage by sea,[6] including:

(a)  the Bulk Cargo Shipping Name (BCSN) when cargo is listed in the BC Code. Secondary names can be used in addition to the BCSN;

(b) the IMO Class for dangerous cargoes in Group B of the BC Code, except MHB;

(c) the UN number, preceded by letters “UN” for dangerous cargoes in Group B of the BC Code;

(d) the total quantity of the cargo offered;

(e)  information on the stowage factor;

(f)  the trimming procedures;

(g) the likelihood of shifting, including angle of repose, if applicable;

(h) additional information in the form of a certificate on the moisture content of the cargo and its transportable moisture limit in the case of a concentrate or other cargo which may liquefy;

(i)  formation of a liquid base and shipping of cargo;

(j)  any other relevant safety information, such as:

(i)    chemical properties in the case of a solid bulk cargo not classified in accordance with the provisions of the IMDG Code, but which has chemical properties that may create a potential hazard;

(ii)    toxic or flammable gases which may be generated by cargo;

(iii)   flammability, toxicity, corrosiveness and propensity to oxygen depletion of the cargo;

(iv)   self-heating properties of the cargo, and the need for trimming if appropriate, etc.; and

(k) if waste cargoes are being transported for disposal, or for processing for disposal, the name of the cargoes should be preceded by the word “WASTE”.

8.1.2  In all documents relating to the carriage of dangerous goods in solid form in bulk by sea, the BCSN must be used.  Trade names alone must not be used.

8.1.3  The master must not permit solid bulk cargo to be loaded onto the ship until information has been provided in accordance with 8.1.1.

This is a penal provision

8.2  Certificates of test

If compliance with 8.1.1 and the BC Code requires material to be sampled and tested, the shipper is responsible for arranging sampling and testing and for providing, if required by the BC Code, a certificate of test to the master or the master’s representative.[7]

9  Medical guide

The master of a ship registered in Australia carrying solid bulk cargo listed in Appendix 1 of the BC Code, or dangerous goods in solid form in bulk, must ensure that there is on board a copy of the Medical First-Aid Guide for Use in Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods.[8]

This is a penal provision

10  Cargoes which may liquefy

10.1  Transportable moisture limit

Except as provided for by 10.2, a person must not take or send a ship to sea with solid bulk cargo having a moisture content in excess of the transportable moisture limit for that cargo specified in the BC Code.

This is a penal provision

10.2  Exception

Provision 10.1 does not apply if there is on board the ship evidence that the Administration of the country in which the ship is registered:

(a)  has approved the ship as a specially fitted or specially constructed cargo ship complying with provision 7.3.2 or 7.3.3 of the BC Code, as appropriate; or

(b) is satisfied that:

(i)    safety arrangements have been made to ensure adequate stability in the case of cargo shifting; and

(ii)    the ship has adequate structural integrity.

10.3  Approvals in respect of an Australian registered ship

10.3.1  The Manager, Ship Inspections, may approve an Australian registered ship as being a specially fitted or specially constructed cargo ship complying with provision 7.3.2 or 7.3.3 of the BC Code, as appropriate.

10.3.2  Application for approval under 10.3.1 must be made to the Manager, Ship Inspections, and must include the information specified in 7.3.4 of the BC Code.

11  Loading, stowage, carriage and unloading of solid bulk cargoes

11.1  Subject to the specific provisions in 11.3 to 11.15 (inclusive) and to the other provisions of this Part, a person must not load solid bulk cargo for carriage in a ship, or  unload solid bulk cargo from a ship, except in a manner that is safe and will not adversely affect the safety of the ship on the proposed or subsequent voyage.[9]

This is a penal provision

11.2  Subject to the specific provisions in 11.3 to 11.13 (inclusive) and to the other provisions of this Part, a person must not permit solid bulk cargo to be stowed, trimmed or carried except in accordance with the guidance, advice and recommendations set out in the BC Code and, where appropriate, Regulation 7-3 of Chapter VII of SOLAS.

This is a penal provision

11.3  To enable the master of a ship to prevent excessive stresses in the ship's structure,  the operator of the ship must provide a booklet, written in a language with which the ship's officers responsible for cargo operations are familiar.  If this language is not English, the operator of the ship must provide a booklet written also in the English language.  The booklet must, as a minimum, include:

(a)  stability data, as required by Regulation 22 of Chapter II-1 of SOLAS;

(b) ballasting and deballasting rates and capacities;

(c) maximum allowable load per unit surface area of the tank top plating;

(d) maximum allowable load per hold;

(e)  general loading and unloading instructions with regard to the strength of the ship's structure including any limitations on the most adverse operating conditions during loading, unloading, ballasting operations and the voyage;

(f)  any special restrictions such as limitations on the most adverse operating conditions imposed by the Manager, Ship Inspections, the Flag Administration or the survey authority, if applicable; and

(g) where strength calculations are required, maximum permissible forces and moments on the ship's hull during loading, unloading and the voyage.

This is a penal provision

11.4  Before a solid bulk cargo is loaded or unloaded, the master and the terminal representative must agree on a plan which must ensure that the permissible forces and moments on the ship are not exceeded during loading or unloading, and must include the sequence, quantity and rate of loading or unloading, taking into consideration the speed of loading or unloading, the number of pours and the deballasting or ballasting capability of the ship.[10]  The plan and any subsequent amendments thereto must be lodged with the terminal representative at the port of loading or unloading and a copy retained on board the ship throughout the voyage.

11.5  The terminal representative must retain the plan, referred to in 11.4, and any subsequent amendments thereto for at least 6 months and provide it to the surveyor at the AMSA office at or nearest to the port of loading or unloading whenever requested to do so by the surveyor.

This is a penal provision

11.6  The master of a ship must not permit solid bulk cargo to be loaded onto, or unloaded from, the ship until 11.4 has been complied with.

This is a penal provision

11.7  The master of a ship must ensure that solid bulk cargoes are loaded and trimmed reasonably level, as necessary, to the boundaries of the cargo space so as to minimise the risk of shifting and to ensure that adequate stability will be maintained throughout the voyage.

This is a penal provision

11.8  When solid bulk cargoes are carried in 'tween-decks, the hatchways of such 'tween-decks must be closed in those cases where the loading information indicates an unacceptable level of stress in the bottom structure if the hatchways are left open.  The cargo must be trimmed reasonably level and must either extend from side to side or be secured by additional longitudinal divisions of sufficient strength.  The safe load-carrying capacity of the 'tween-decks must be observed to ensure that the deck-structure is not overloaded.

11.9  The master of the ship must ensure that 11.8 is complied with.

This is a penal provision

11.10  The master and terminal representative must ensure, each within his or her areas of responsibility, that loading and unloading operations are conducted in accordance with the agreed plan, referred to in 11.4.

This is a penal provision

11.11  If during loading or unloading any of the limits of the ship referred to in 11.3 are exceeded or are likely to become so if the loading or unloading continues, the master has the right to suspend operation and the obligation to notify accordingly the appropriate authority of the port State.[11]  The master and the terminal representative must ensure that corrective action is taken.

11.12  The master and terminal representative must ensure, each within his or her areas of responsibility, that 11.11 is complied with.

This is a penal provision

11.13  Ship's personnel must continuously monitor cargo operations.[12]  Where possible,  the ship's draught must be checked regularly during loading or unloading to confirm the tonnage figures supplied.  Each draught and tonnage observation must be recorded in a cargo log-book.  If significant deviations from the agreed plan, referred to in 11.4, are detected, cargo or ballast operations or both must be adjusted to ensure that the deviations are corrected.

11.14  The master must ensure that 11.13 is complied with.

This is a penal provision

11.15  When unloading cargo, the unloading method must be such as to avoid damage to the ship's structure.[13]

12  Unsafe or inadequate arrangements

12.1  If it appears to the Manager, Ship Inspections, that in relation to a particular ship or particular solid bulk cargo that the BC Code insufficiently provides for the safety of persons or for the proper carriage of the cargo, that officer may require additional precautions to be observed.

12.2  A person must not load, stow, trim, carry or unload a cargo in respect of which the Manager, Ship Inspections, has required additional precautions to be observed except in accordance with those additional precautions.

This is a penal provision

13  Inspections and additional tests

13.1  Compliance inspections

13.1.1  A surveyor may at any time inspect a ship loading, to be loaded with, or unloading solid bulk cargo, the loading or unloading arrangements of the ship and the prescribed information relating to the cargo, and its carriage, to ascertain compliance with this Part.

13.1.2  If the surveyor referred to in 13.1.1 determines that there is non-compliance with this Part, a surveyor may at any time make such further inspection or inspections as necessary to ascertain compliance.

13.1.3 The master of a ship must give a surveyor such access to a ship as is necessary for the purposes of 13.1.1 and 13.1.2.

This is a penal provision

13.2  Insufficient information

13.2.1  If it appears to the Manager, Ship Inspections, that the information provided in relation to a particular solid bulk cargo does not establish that the cargo can be loaded, carried and unloaded from a ship without danger to the ship or any person on the ship, that officer may require:

(a)  the provision of such additional information; or

(b) such inspections, sampling and testing in accordance with the BC Code,

as will establish whether the cargo can be loaded, carried and unloaded without danger.

13.2.2  If it appears to the Manager, Ship Inspections, that the information provided in relation to a particular ship does not establish that the solid bulk cargo, proposed to be loaded, carried or unloaded, can be loaded, carried and unloaded without danger to the ship or any person on the ship, that officer may require the provision of such additional information as will establish whether the cargo can be loaded, carried or unloaded without danger.

13.3  Shipper to provide details

13.3.1  For the purposes of 13.1 or 13.2, the shipper of a solid bulk cargo required to be tested must make available:

(a)  such samples of the cargo as are reasonably necessary to carry out a test;

(b) details of the methodology of sampling and testing previously carried out on the cargo; and

(c) details of the results of the required sampling and testing.

13.3.2  The Manager, Ship Inspections, may prohibit the loading of a solid bulk cargo until 13.3.1 has been complied with.

13.3.3  A person must not load a solid bulk cargo prohibited by the Manager, Ship Inspections, under 13.3.2.

This is a penal provision

13.4  Decisions of competent authority

13.4.1  If:

(a)  it is intended that a particular solid bulk cargo be carried in a ship; and

(b) the BC Code requires consultation with, or the approval or permission of the competent authority in relation to the carriage, stowage or handling of such cargo, the master of the ship must allow a surveyor to make such inspections as are necessary to enable the Manager, Ship Inspections, to provide such consultation or determine whether or not to grant such approva1 or permission.

13.4.2  The Manager, Ship Inspections, may prohibit the loading of a solid bulk cargo until 13.4.1 has been complied with.

13.4.3  A person must not load a solid bulk cargo prohibited by the Manager, Ship Inspections, under 13.4.2.

This is a penal provision

14  Allowable shear forces & bending moments

14.1  Prior to loading of a ship, the master must demonstrate by appropriate means to a surveyor, if required by the surveyor, that the allowable still water shear forces and bending moments will not be exceeded during loading, and the allowable sea-going shear forces and bending moments will not be exceeded at the time of departure.

14.2  The Manager, Ship Inspections, may prohibit the loading of a solid bulk cargo until 14.1 has been complied with.

14.3  A person must not load a solid bulk cargo prohibited by the Manager, Ship Inspections, under 14.2.

This is a penal provision

15  Incidents at sea involving dangerous cargoes

15.1  If an incident takes place involving the loss or likely loss overboard of dangerous goods in solid form in bulk into the sea, the master or other person having charge of the ship must report the particulars of such incident without delay and to the fullest extent possible to the nearest coastal State.

This is a penal provision.

15.2  In the event of a ship referred to in 15.1 being abandoned, or in the event of a report from such a ship being incomplete or unobtainable, the operator of the ship, or agent thereof, must make or complete the report.

This is a penal provision.

* * * * * *


Appendix

Amplification of the Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes

For the purposes of applying the BC Code, the amplifications set out in this Appendix are to be taken to be part of the BC Code.

 

Material

Amplification of segregation or stowage requirements of
Appendix 1 of the BC Code

AMMONIUM NITRATE BASED FERTILIZER
UN 2067

Shipment subject to approval following inspection of the condition and cleanliness of the intended cargo space.

AMMONIUM NITRATE BASED FERTILIZER
UN 2071

Result of trough test to be certified by a competent chemist

LOW SPECIFIC ACTIVITY MATERIALS

Shipment subject to approval following inspection of the following arrangements:

(a)    all unpacked material, other than ores containing only naturally occurring radionuclides, to be shipped in such manner that under routine conditions likely to be encountered, there will be no escape of contents from the cargo space nor any loss of shielding; and

 

(b)    the cargo space to be for exclusive use of LSA-1, except only surface contaminated objects SCO-1 in which contamination on accessible and inaccessible surfaces is not greater than 4 Bq/cm2 (10-4 Ci/cm2) for beta and gamma emitters or 0.4 Bq/cm2 (10-5 Ci/cm2) for alpha emitters.

SEEDCAKE, containing vegetable oil UN 1386

(a) mechanically expelled seeds, containing more than 10% of oil or more than 20% of oil and moisture combined

Oil content and moisture content to be certified by a competent chemist.

Scrap metal

Shipper to declare in writing that cargo does not include borings, shavings, turnings or cuttings in a form susceptible to self heating.

 

* * * * * *



[1]        Subsection 257(3) of the Navigation Act provides that a person who is guilty of an offence under the regulations made by virtue of section 257 is punishable on conviction by a fine not exceeding $5,500.

[2]        Subregulation 4(1) of the Navigation (Orders) Regulations provides that a person who fails to comply with a provision of an order made under subsection 425(1AA) of the Navigation Act that is expressed to be a penal provision is guilty of an offence and is punishable by a fine not exceeding 50 penalty units. 

         A penalty unit is currently $110. Subsection 4B(3) of the Crimes Act 1914 provides that a court may impose a fine not exceeding 250 penalty units for a body corporate.

[3]        Unless the Terminal Manager (or other person having authority) has nominated otherwise, the terminal representative will be taken to be the person in charge appointed under Marine Orders, Part 32.

[4]        Applications for modifications or exemptions should be made to the Manager, Ship Inspections, and should be accompanied by relevant information.  The Manager, Ship Inspections, may require additional information to assist in reaching a decision.

[5]        For the convenience of agents, a weekly or fortnightly list of ships scheduled for loading at each port, with the above details and the expected date and time of berthing, where known, is acceptable, provided that any substantial change, such as the insertion of ships not on the list, must be advised to the surveyor at the AMSA office at or nearest to the port of loading.  This list should be provided at least 48 hours before the expected arrival of any ship not on a previous list.

[6]        A suitable form for the provision of information to the master is the “Shippers Declaration” form obtainable from AMSA through its website at www.amsa.gov.au

[7]        The BC Code sets out in more detail the kind of information that should be provided by the shipper and the methodology to be used. Where determination of some of the information may be imprecise, the shipper should provide as much information as possible by the most appropriate means relevant to the material. Care should be taken to ensure that information is current, e.g. taking account of changes in physical or chemical composition due to variations in specifications or as a result of weather conditions.

[8]        The Medical First-Aid Guide for Use in Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods  can be found in the Supplement to the IMDG Code.

[9]        The Code of Practice for the Safe Loading and Unloading of Bulk Carriers (BLU Code), published by IMO and obtainable from the AMSA website at www.amsa.gov.au, gives guidance on the suitability of ships and terminals, procedures for the safe loading and unloading of solid bulk cargoes and model forms for loading and unloading plans and a ship/shore safety checklist.

[10]       A plan should conform as far as possible with the BLU Code.

[11]       If the ship is at an Australian port, the appropriate authority is the surveyor at the AMSA office at or nearest to the port of loading or unloading.

[12]       As valuable information leading to further development of the BC Code may be obtained from voyage reports, masters or their representatives should notify a surveyor at the AMSA office at or nearest to the port of loading or unloading of any peculiarities of behaviour observed in various types of solid bulk cargo and, in particular, report as soon as possible the circumstances of any significant incidents involving such materials.

[13]       With respect to disposal of cargo residue, the master of a ship is required to comply with Annex V of MARPOL 73/78, which is given effect in Australia by the Protection of the Sea (Prevention of Pollution from Ships) Act 1983 and Marine Orders, Part 95.