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Licences/Radiocommunications as amended, taking into account amendments up to Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2006 (No. 1)
Administered by: DCITA
Registered 27 Jul 2006
Start Date 26 Jul 2006
End Date 03 Jan 2008
Date of repeal 16 Sep 2015
Repealed by

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000

as amended

made under sections 132 and 135 of the

This compilation was prepared on 26 July 2006
taking into account amendments up to
Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2006 (No. 1)

The text of any of those amendments not in force on that date is appended
in the Notes section

Prepared by the Office of Legislative Drafting and Publishing,
Attorney-General’s Department,
Canberra


Contents

                        1     Name of Class Licence [see Note 1]                                                     3

                        2     Commencement [see Note 1]                                                               3

                        3     Revocation                                                                                          3

                      3A     Definitions                                                                                           4

                        4     Class Licence                                                                                     4

                        5     Standards                                                                                           5

Schedule 1             Transmitters                                                                                      6

Notes                                                                                                                                       17

 

 


  

  

1              Name of Class Licence [see Note 1]

                This Class Licence is the Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000.

2              Commencement [see Note 1]

                This Class Licence commences on gazettal.

3              Revocation

                The following instruments are revoked:

                (a)    the Radiocommunications Class Licence (Low Interference Potential Devices) 1997;

               (b)    the Radiocommunications Class Licence (Low Interference Potential Devices) Variation 1998 (No. 1).

Note

A radiocommunications device supported under this Class Licence can be expected to be operating in radiofrequency spectrum also used by other radiocommunications devices (that is, it shares the spectrum with them). Devices supported under this Class Licence are typically used for communications over short distances.

By placing appropriate limits on parameters such as device type, radiated power levels and frequencies of operation, the interference potential of a low interference potential device (LIPD) may be held to a sufficiently low level that enables sharing the spectrum with other radiocommunications devices on an uncoordinated basis in most circumstances.

It is recognised that interference arising from the operation of a LIPD is still possible, although under less likely circumstances. As an aid to interference resolution in those circumstances, it is a condition of the operation of a device under this Class Licence that the device not cause interference to other radiocommunications devices; as well, a device will not be afforded protection from interference caused by other radiocommunications services (see paragraph 4 (1) (b) and Note 1 after section 4 of this Class Licence).

Should interference occur, the onus is on the user of a LIPD to take measures to resolve that interference, for example, by re-tuning or ceasing to operate the LIPD. Some LIPDs are designed so that they are able to be re-tuned, to assist the user in avoiding interference locally.

Some of the frequency bands mentioned in this Class Licence cover bands designated for industrial, scientific and medical (ISM) applications. ISM applications generate radio frequency energy and use it locally for non-radiocommunications applications (eg. microwave ovens). Radiocommunications services operating in ISM-designated bands may experience interference from ISM applications. In accordance with the internationally-recognised arrangements for interference resolution that apply in such bands, this Class Licence notes that radiocommunications devices operating in ISM-designated bands are not afforded protection from interference that may be caused by ISM applications (see Note 2 after section 4 of this Class Licence).

LIPDs are sometimes used for radio applications with commercial or safety-of-life implications. Users of such applications are encouraged to have particular regard to the suitability of operating under this Class Licence for their radiocommunications needs.

Some applications of LIPDs require that a device meet additional physical or technical requirements outside the scope of this Class Licence. The use, marketing and supply of such devices in Australia may be dependant on the approval of the appropriate regulatory body, such as the Therapeutic Goods Administration or State Government Authorities.

Manufacturers and suppliers of radiocommunications products able to be supported under this Class Licence are encouraged to have regard to the information in this note when forming advice about the suitability of their products for the intended application of the products by customers.

3A           Definitions

coverage area, for a broadcasting station, means the area surrounding the associated television transmitter within the boundary described by the following field strength limits:

                (a)    UHF Band IV: 62 dBuV/metre except rural towns where the limit is 64 dBuV/metre;

               (b)    UHF Band V: 67 dBuV/metre.

device compliance day, for a device, means the most recent of the following days:

                (a)    if the device was manufactured in Australia — the day it was manufactured; and

               (b)    if the device was manufactured overseas and imported — the day it was imported; and

                (c)    if the device was altered or modified in a material respect — the day it was altered or modified.

low interference potential device means a radiocommunications device that complies with the conditions set out in this Class Licence.

nominated distance of a specified Australian radio‑astronomy site, means:

                (a)    within 10 km of Parkes Observatory located near Parkes (Latitude 32° 59¢ 59.8657² S Longitude 148° 15¢ 44.3591² E); or

               (b)    within 10 km of Paul Wild Observatory located near Narrabri (Latitude 30° 18¢ 52.048² S Longitude 149° 32¢ 56.327² E); or

                (c)    within 3 km of the Canberra Deep Space Communications Complex (Latitude 35° 23¢ 54² S Longitude 148° 58¢ 40² E); or

               (d)    within 10 km of the Radio Astronomy Park in Western Australia (Latitude 26° 37¢ 13.4² S Longitude 117° 30¢ 40² E).

Note   For the definition of other expressions used in this Class Licence, see the Radiocommunications Act 1992, and the Radiocommunications (Interpretation) Determination 2000.

4              Class Licence

         (1)   This Class Licence authorises a person to operate a transmitter included in a class of transmitters mentioned in an item in Schedule 1, subject to the following conditions:

                (a)    the transmitter must be operated:

                          (i)    on a frequency, or within a range of frequencies, mentioned in the item; and

                         (ii)    at a radiated power that does not exceed the maximum EIRP mentioned in the item; and

                         (iii)    within the limitations (if any) mentioned in the item;

               (b)    the transmitter’s operation must not cause interference to the operation of radiocommunications services.

         (2)   The frequency, or range of frequencies, and the maximum EIRP mentioned in an item in Schedule 1 must be construed in accordance with the interpretative provisions (if any) mentioned in the item.

Note 1   A low interference potential device will not be afforded protection from interference caused by other radiocommunications devices. A low interference potential device operated under this Class Licence is generally not expected to suffer interference. However, an individual low interference potential device may experience, from other radiocommunications devices, interference arising from the particular circumstances of the device’s operation.

Note 2   In accordance with the requirements of footnote AUS 32 and footnote 150 to the Table of Allocations in the Australian Radiofrequency Spectrum Plan, a low interference potential device will not be afforded protection from interference that may be caused by ISM applications in the ISM bands 13.553 MHz – 13.567 MHz, 26.957 MHz – 27.283 MHz, 40.66 MHz – 40.70 MHz, 918 MHz – 926 MHz, 2 400 MHz – 2 500 MHz, 5 725 MHz – 5 875 MHz and 24 000 MHz – 24 250 MHz.

5              Standards

         (1)   Each of the following radiocommunications devices must comply with the Radiocommunications (Electromagnetic Radiation — Human Exposure) Standard 1999:

                (a)    a handset, for a cellular mobile telephone service, that has a device compliance day on or after 22 November 2000;

               (b)    a handset, for a cordless telephone service, that has a device compliance day on or after 22 November 2000;

                (c)    a land station (cradle) that:

                          (i)    is used in a cordless telephone service; and

                         (ii)    has a device compliance day on or after 22 November 2000.

         (2)   In addition, if the device compliance day for a device authorised under this class licence is on or after the date of commencement of the Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2001 (No.1), the device must comply with any standard applicable to the device on its device compliance day, as in force on that day.

Note 1   The Australian Communications Authority wishes to make it clear that if a standard mentioned in subsection (2) is amended or replaced by another standard after the device compliance day for the device, the device need not comply with the new or amended standard.

Note 2   Section 5 of the Radiocommunications Act 1992 provides that standard means a standard made under section 162 of that Act.


Schedule 1        Transmitters

(section 4)

  

Item

Class of transmitter

Permitted operating frequency band (MHz)
(lower limit exclusive, upper limit inclusive)

Maximum EIRP

Limitations

1

All transmitters

0.000–0.014

200 µW

 

2

All transmitters

0.014–0.01995

50 µW

 

3

All transmitters

0.02005–0.07

7.5 µW

 

4

All transmitters

0.07–0.16

3 µW

 

5

All transmitters

1.   0.16–0.285

2.   0.325–0.415

500 nW

 

6

All transmitters

3.025–3.155

7.5 nW

 

7

All transmitters

3.5–3.7

30 pW

 

8

All transmitters

1.   3.7–3.95

2.   4.438–4.65

7.5 nW

 

9

All transmitters

13.553–13.567

100 mW

 

10

All transmitters

24–24.89

10 mW

 

11

All transmitters

26.957–27.283

1 W

1.     Separation of the operating frequency from the centre frequency of any adjacent citizen band radio channel must be at least 5 kHz.

2.    The emission bandwidth must not exceed 10 kHz.

12

All transmitters

1.   29.7–29.72

2.   30–30.0625

3.   30.3125–31

4.   36.6–37

5.   39–39.7625

6.   40.25–40.66

100 mW

 

13

All transmitters

40.66–41

1 W

 

14

All transmitters

54–56

2.5 mW

 

15

All transmitters

1.   70–70.24375

2.   77.29375–77.49375

3.   150.7875–152.49375

4.   173.29375–174

100 mW

 

16

All transmitters

1.   225–242

2.   244–267

3.   273–303.95

4.   304.05–328.6

5.   335.4–399.9

10 µW

 

17

All transmitters

433.05–434.79

25 mW

 

18

All transmitters

915–928

3 mW

 

19

All transmitters

2400–2483.5

10 mW

 

20

All transmitters

1.   10500–10550

2.   24000–24250

100 mW

 

21

Wireless audio transmitters and auditory assistance transmitters

88–108

10 µW

1.    Emission must be frequency modulated and have a maximum bandwidth of 180 kHz.

2.    Transmission in a radio channel must not originate in the licence area of a radio broadcasting station (including a repeater or translator station) operating in the same channel.

22

Wireless audio transmitters

174–230

3 mW

 

1.    Emission must be frequency modulated and have a maximum bandwidth of 330 kHz.

 

 

 

 

2.    Transmission in a TV channel must not originate in the licence area of a TV broadcasting station (including a repeater or translator station) operating in the same channel.

 

 

 

 

3.    When transmitting in an unused TV channel, and in the coverage area of a TV broadcasting station (including a repeater or translator station) operating in an adjacent TV channel, the channel centre frequency of the wireless audio transmitter must be at least 200 kHz above the upper edge of the adjacent TV channel, or 400 kHz below the lower edge of the adjacent TV channel.

22A

Wireless audio transmitters

520–820

 

100 mW

 

1.    Emission must be frequency modulated and have a maximum bandwidth of 330 kHz.

 

 

 

 

2.    Transmission in a broadcasting services bands channel must not originate in the coverage area of a broadcasting station (including a repeater or translator station) operating in the same channel.

 

 

 

 

3.    The origin of a transmission in a broadcasting services bands channel must be such that the resulting field strength at the nearest boundary of the coverage area of a broadcasting station using the channel does not exceed 30 dBuV/m.

 

 

 

 

4.    When transmitting in an unused broadcasting services bands channel, and in the coverage area of a broadcasting station (including a repeater or translator station) operating in an adjacent channel, the channel centre frequency of the wireless audio transmitter must be at least 400 kHz above the upper edge of the adjacent channel, or 400 kHz below the lower edge of the adjacent channel.

23

Biomedical telemetry transmitters

174–230

10 µW

 

24

Biomedical telemetry transmitters

520–668

3 mW

Transmission in a TV channel must not originate in the licence area of an analogue TV broadcasting station (including a repeater or translator station) operating in the same channel.

25

Telecommand or telemetry transmitters

472.0125–472.1125

100 mW

 

26

Telecommand or telemetry transmitters

1.   2400–2450

2.   5725–5795

3.   5815–5875

1 W

 

27

Telecommand or telemetry transmitters

5795–5815

2 W

 

28

Auditory assistance transmitters

3.155–3.4, with a carrier frequency of:

      (a)     3.175 MHz; or

      (b)     3.225 MHz; or

      (c)     3.275 MHz; or

      (d)     3.325 MHz.

60 µW

 

29

Auditory assistance transmitters

1.   41–42, with a carrier frequency of:

      (a)     41.55 MHz; or

      (b)     41.65 MHz; or

      (c)     41.75 MHz; or

      (d)     41.85 MHz; or

      (e)     41.95 MHz.

1.3 mW

 

 

 

2.   43–44, with a carrier frequency of:

      (a)     43.05 MHz; or

      (b)     43.15 MHz; or

      (c)     43.25 MHz; or

      (d)     43.35 MHz; or

      (e)     43.45 MHz.

 

 

30

Radiofrequency identification transmitters

1.   1.77–2.17

2.   2.93–3.58

3.   7.2–10.01

100 pW

 

31

Radiofrequency identification transmitters

1.   13.553–13.567

2.   918–926

3.   2400–2450

4.   5725–5795

5.   5815–5875

6.   24000–24250

1 W

 

32

Radiofrequency identification transmitters

5795–5815

2 W

 

33

Alarm transmitters (including security and personal safety transmitters)

303.60–304.05

100 µW

 

34

Home detention monitoring equipment

314.075–314.325

200 µW

In a 10 second period, a single transmission must not exceed 10 milliseconds.

35

Radiodetermination transmitters

24000–24250

1 W

 

36

Radiodetermination transmitters

60000–61000

20 mW

 

37

Transmitters used for underground communications

1.     31–32

2.     33–34

3.     35–36

4.     37–38

5.     42–43

6.     44–45

7.     70.24375–74.8

8.     75.2–77.29375

9.     77.49375–84.69375

10.   149.25–149.9

11.   150.05–151.39375

12.   152.49375–156

13.   157.45–160.6

14.   160.975–161.475

15.   162.05–173.29375

16.   403–406

17.   406.1–420

18.   450–500.99375

19.   504.99375–510.99375

20.   514.99375–520

3.5 nW

The maximum EIRP applies at an above-ground opening associated with the underground communications.

38

Transmitters used for underground communications

1.   0.5265–1.605

2.   87.5–108

10 µW

The maximum EIRP applies at an above-ground opening associated with the underground communications.

39

Aquatic animal tracking transmitters

48–49

10 mW

 

40

Radiodetermination transmitters operated in radiofrequency-shielded enclosures

24050–26050

75 nW

The maximum EIRP applies outside the shielded enclosure.

41

Personal alarm transmitters

27.500–27.510

100 µW

 

42

Transmitters used with personal alarm transmitters operating in the frequency band 27.500–27.510 MHz

27.500–27.510

500 mW

Each transmission must not exceed 4 seconds over a 60 second period.

43

Alarm transmitters

344.8–345.2

1 mW

The average EIRP must not exceed 100 µW:

(a)  if the length of a pulse train does not exceed 0.1 second — in the length of one complete pulse train; or

(b)  if the length of a pulse train exceeds 0.1 second — in the 0.1 second period during which the EIRP is at its maximum value; or

(c)  if a transmitter operates for more than 0.1 second — in the 0.1 second period during which the EIRP is at its maximum value.

44

Radio Local Area Network transmitters used indoors

5150–5250

200 mW (averaged over the entire transmission burst)

1.   If the emission bandwidth is 1 MHz or greater, the radiated power spectral density in any 1 MHz is limited to 10 mW per MHz.

2.   If the emission bandwidth is less than
1 MHz, the radiated power spectral density in any 4 kHz is limited to 40 µW per 4 kHz.

44A

Radio Local Area Network transmitters used indoors

5250–5350

200 mW (averaged over the entire transmission burst)

1.   If the emission bandwidth is 1 MHz or greater, the spectral density in any 1 MHz is limited to 10 mW EIRP per MHz.

2.   If the emission bandwidth is less than 1 MHz, the spectral density in any
4 kHz is limited to
40 µW EIRP per 4 kHz.

 

 

 

 

3.   From 1 January 2006 devices operated for the first time must use Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) and Transmit Power Control (TPC). If TPC is not used then the maximum EIRP is limited to 100 mW.

45

Digital modulation transmitters

915–928

1 W

1.   The radiated peak power spectral density in any
3 kHz is limited to 25 mW per 3 kHz.

2.   The minimum 6 dB bandwidth must be at least 500 kHz.

45A

Digital modulation transmitters

2400–2483.5

4 W

1.   The radiated peak power spectral density in any 3 kHz is limited to 25 mW per 3 kHz.

2.   The minimum 6 dB bandwidth must be at least 500 kHz.

45B

Digital modulation transmitters

5725–5850

4 W

1.   The radiated peak power spectral density in any 3 kHz is limited to 25 mW per 3 kHz.

2.   The minimum 6 dB bandwidth must be at least 500 kHz.

46

Radio Local Area Network transmitters

1.   5470–5600

2.   5650–5725

 

1 W (averaged over the entire transmission burst)

1.   The maximum radiated mean power density must not exceed 50 mW/MHz EIRP in any 1 MHz band.

 

 

 

 

2.   Must use Dynamic Frequency Selection (DFS) and Transmit Power Control (TPC). If TPC is not implemented, then the maximum EIRP is limited to 500 mW.

47

Radiodetermination transmitters

5725–5875

1 mW

 

48

Radiodetermination transmitters

76000–77000

25 W

 

49

Medical implant communications systems transmitters

402–405

25 µW (averaged over the transmission burst within a reference bandwidth of 300 kHz)

1.   The maximum EIRP applies outside the body.

2.   Systems must have a minimum of nine channels selectable by the system controller and spread across the whole band.

3.   Implanted transmitters must only transmit under external control, except for medical implant events.

4.   Systems must utilise a listen-before-transmit protocol.

 

Note 1   The systems and associated medical implant communications systems transmitters mentioned in item 48 are devices that require marketing approval by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

Note 2   A medical implant event is an occurrence or lack of occurrence, recognised by a medical implant device or a health care professional, that requires the immediate transmission of data by the medical implant communications systems transmitter to protect the safety or wellbeing of the person that the medical implant device has been implanted.

50

Medical implant telemetry systems transmitters

403.560–403.760

100 nW

The maximum EIRP applies outside the body.

 

Note   The systems and associated medical implant devices mentioned in item 49 are devices that require marketing approval by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.

51

Data communications transmitters

59400–62900

150 W peak

1.   Transmitters are limited to land and maritime deployments.

2.   Maximum total peak transmitter power output is 10 mW.

52

Frequency hopping transmitters

915–928

1 W

A minimum of 20 hopping frequencies must be used.

53

Frequency hopping transmitters

2400–2483.5

500 mW

A minimum of 15 hopping frequencies must be used.

54

Frequency hopping transmitters

2400–2483.5

4 W

A minimum of 75 hopping frequencies must be used.

55

Frequency hopping transmitters

5725–5850

4 W

A minimum of 75 hopping frequencies must be used.

56

Ultra‑wideband short‑range vehicle radar systems

22000–26500

 

See limitations

1.   The maximum radiated average power density is ‑41.3 dBm/MHz EIRP.

 

 

 

 

2.   The maximum broadband radiated peak power density is 0 dBm/50 MHz EIRP.

 

 

 

 

3.   Must meet the requirements of ETSI 302‑288‑1 as it applies from time to time.

 

 

 

 

4.   Must not be operated within a nominated distance of a specified Australian radio‑astronomy site.

 

 


Notes to the Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000

Note 1

The Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000 (in force under sections 132 and 135 of the Radiocommunications Act 1992) as shown in this compilation is amended as indicated in the Tables below.

Under the Legislative Instruments Act 2003, which came into force on 1 January 2005, it is a requirement for all non-exempt legislative instruments to be registered on the Federal Register of Legislative Instruments.

Table of Instruments

Title

Date of notification
in Gazette or FRLI registration

Date of
commencement

Application, saving or
transitional provisions

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence 2000

5 July 2000 (see Gazette 2000, No. GN26)

5 July 2003

 

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2000 (No. 1)

22 Nov 2000 (see Gazette 2000, No. GN46)

22 Nov 2000

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2001 (No. 1)

26 Sept 2001 (see Gazette 2001, No. GN38)

26 Sept 2001

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2003 (No. 1)

6 Aug 2003 (see Gazette 2003, No. GN31)

6 Aug 2003

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2005 (No. 1)

23 Aug 2005 (see F2005L02339)

24 Aug 2005

Radiocommunications (Low Interference Potential Devices) Class Licence Variation 2006 (No. 1)

25 July 2006 (see F2006L02420)

26 July 2006

Table of Amendments

ad. = added or inserted      am. = amended      rep. = repealed      rs. = repealed and substituted

 

Provision affected

How affected

 

 

Note to s. 3............................

am. 2000 No. 1; 2001 No. 1

 

 

rs. 2005 No. 1

 

S. 3A........................................

ad. 2001 No. 1

 

 

am. 2006 No. 1

 

Notes 1 and 2 to s. 4 (2).....

rep. 2001 No. 1

 

Note 3 to s. 4 (2)
Renumbered Note 1........


2001 No. 1

 

Note 4 to s. 4 (2)
Renumbered Note 2........


2001 No. 1

 

Heading to s. 5.....................

rs. 2001 No. 1

 

S. 5..........................................

ad. 2000 No. 1

 

 

am. 2001 No. 1

 

Schedule 1

 

 

Schedule 1............................

am. 2000 No. 1

 

 

rs. 2001 No. 1

 

 

am. 2003 No. 1; 2005 No. 1; 2006 No. 1