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Administered by: Environment
Published Date 06 May 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 

INCLUSION OF A PLACE IN THE NATIONAL HERITAGE LIST

 

 

FITZGERALD RIVER NATIONAL PARK

 

 

 

I, Greg Hunt, Minister for the Environment, having considered in relation to the place described in the Schedule of this instrument:

 

(a)       the Australian Heritage Council's assessment whether the place meets any of the National Heritage criteria; and

 

(b)       the comments relating to the place given to the Council under sections 324JG and 324JH of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999; and

 

being satisfied that the place described in the Schedule has the National Heritage values specified in the Schedule, pursuant to section 324JJ of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, include the place and its National Heritage values in the National Heritage List.

 

 

 

Dated  4 May 2016

 

 

[signed]

Greg Hunt

Minister for the Environment


SCHEDULE

 

STATE / TERRITORY

Local Government

Name

Location / Boundary

Criteria / Values

 

WESTERN AUSTRALIA

 

Shire of Jerramangup; Shire of Ravensthorpe

 

Fitzgerald River National Park:

 

An area of approximately 29,7244ha, south of the South Coast Highway between Jerramungup, Ravensthorpe, Hopetoun and Bremer Bay, comprising the whole of the Fitzgerald River National Park as gazetted on 19/1/1973.

 


 

Criterion

Values

 (a)

 

the place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural history.

The Fitzgerald River National Park contains an exceptional concentration of plant species richness and endemism.

 

The Fitzgerald River National Park has approximately 1,748 plant species, of which 75 are endemic to the National Park and around 250 are considered rare or geographically restricted.

 

The highly weathered soils of the region have driven high rates of speciation and local endemism, as plants have evolved different strategies to acquire and use available nutrients.

 

Plant species richness and endemism is particularly high in the Fitzgerald River National Park due to its wide range of landforms, geology and soil types. This supports a diverse community of shrublands and heath, often dominated by eucalypt mallee species. Woodlands occur mainly along rivers and in swamps.

 

While endemic and rare plant species occur throughout the National Park, there is a particularly high concentration of these species in the rugged quartzite ranges, known as the Barren Ranges. 

 

The Fitzgerald River National Park is one of the most important places in Australia for demonstrating species richness and endemism in several plant families and genera including: the Myrtaceae family, including the genera of Eucalyptus, Melaleuca (paper barks) and Verticordia (feather flowers); the Fabaceae family, including the genera of Acacia (wattles), Gastrolobium (poison peas) and Daviesia (bitter peas); the Proteaceae family, including the genera of Banksia, Hakea and Grevillea; and the Ericaceae family, including the Leucopogon (beard heath) genus.

 

The National Park also contains outstanding species richness and endemism in the plant families of Epacridaceae (southern heaths); Thymelaeaceae (pimeleas); and Rutaceae (e.g. boronia, correa).

 


 

 (d)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

the place has outstanding heritage value to the nation because of the place's importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's natural or cultural environments.

South-west Australia is one of 35 internationally recognised 'hotspots' for biodiversity, containing high levels of plant species richness and endemism.

 

The Fitzgerald River National Park is one of the best places to demonstrate the extraordinary plant life of the region. It contains over one-quarter of the plant species found in south-west Australia, including a high number of endemic and geographically restricted plants. The Fitzgerald River National Park is therefore one of the most important reserves for plant conservation in Australia.

 

 

 

 

 

For more information search the Australian Heritage Database at http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search.pl using the name of the place.