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Administered by: Environment
Published Date 22 Jan 2016

 

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999

 

INCLUSION OF  PLACES IN THE COMMONWEALTH HERITAGE LIST

 

 

Bankstown Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

Sydney Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

Essendon Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

Parafield Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

Hobart Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

Launceston Airport Air Traffic Control Tower

 

 

I, Greg Hunt, Minister for the Environment, having considered in relation to each of the above places (and described in the Schedule of this instrument):

(a)       the Australian Heritage Council’s assessment whether the place meets any of the Commonwealth Heritage criteria; and

(b)       the comments given to the Council under sections 341JF and 341JG of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999; and

being satisfied that the places described in the Schedule have the Commonwealth Heritage values specified in the Schedule, pursuant to section 341JI of the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999, include the places and their Commonwealth Heritage values in the Commonwealth Heritage List.

 

 

 

Dated   24/11/2015

 

[signed by]

Greg Hunt

Minister for the Environment

 


 

SCHEDULE

 

STATE / TERRITORY

Local Governments

Name

Location / Boundary

Criteria / Values

 

NEW SOUTH WALES

Bankstown City

 

Bankstown Airport Air Traffic Control Tower:

 

Located at Bankstown Airport, Bankstown, Tower Road, comprising the whole of Lot 103 DP852861.


 

Criteria

Values

(d)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's  importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's

natural or cultural environments

Bankstown Air Traffic Control tower is of historical significance in a national context as a representative and substantially intact example, both externally and internally, of a standardised control tower form dating from the first phase of post-World War II design in air traffic control facilities (1950s to late 1960s).

 

Bankstown is one of a group of control towers built essentially to the same operational and technical standards and specifications across Australia and Papua New Guinea from the 1950s until the late-1960s, when perimeter frame towers became the standard model for control towers at secondary and general aviation airports in Australia. Its design is derived from the 1950s air traffic control towers (Essendon, Hobart, Launceston and others), a design approach that was repeated and refined through the 1960s. While a late example of this standard type, Bankstown is distinguished from the majority of other surviving comparisons through

its relative intactness. Other than for the modification of windows at the

upper level on the eastern elevation, the building is intact externally;

internally it also retains the majority of its plan form and fabric. It is unusual in retaining its original timber-framed console, albeit modified. The associated radio equipment room and power house are also intact

externally.

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

Rockdale Municipality

 

Sydney Airport Air Traffic Control Tower:

 

Located at Sydney Airport, Lawrence Hargrave Avenue South, comprising the whole of Lot 1 DP787029.

 


 

Criteria

Values

(f)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

importance in demonstrating a high degree of creative or technical

achievement at a particular period

Sydney Air Traffic Control tower embodies a number of new ideas, both architectural and technical. It is the only cable-stayed control tower in Australia, and one of very few internationally. The cabin roof, carried on a single central column, was another Australian ‘first’ – the central column avoids interruption to sightlines by external columns. It was the first Australian tower with a circular cabin, and first to be fitted with a peripheral console, an established format internationally and the preferred future form in Australia. The requirement for unimpeded sightlines over the expanded airport dictated the use of peripheral consoles, which in turn informed the requirement for a central column to support the cabin roof. These design features, practically resolved at Sydney 5 Air Traffic Control tower, were requirements of the brief.

 

Sydney 5 was also the first tower in Australia to employ computer screen-based technology for its control consoles, derived from the ‘fly-by-wire’ concept used in modern aircraft. The touch-screen consoles give controllers ready access to radar, communication and meteorological data displays. The use of touch-screen technology is consistent with on-going international developments in air traffic management. However, it is the formal appearance of Sydney 5 ATC tower that is considered to be of greatest interest.

 

The external expression of the tower was an innovative and highly creative interpretation of the standard brief for control towers, adapting conventional control tower forms to explore the potential presented by its prominent site. An assured and resolved design by a prominent award-winning architect, Sydney 5 ATC tower stands as the first (and to-date, the only) control tower in Australia consciously designed as a  landmark, and displaying such distinctive and flamboyant architectural qualities. Its predecessors in the Australian context were either utilitarian structures based on standardised models (1950s-1980s), or imposing but comparatively restrained forms comprised of slender concrete columns surmounted by amenities/services with cabins above (late-1960s to present). By way of comparison, the towers at Perth Airport (commissioned 1986) and Brisbane Airport (1988) are taller but far more restrained architecturally; both are facetted concrete columns flaring at c. 45m to accommodate amenities/services and control cabins.

 

Australian towers built subsequent to Sydney 5 (commissioned in 1996) have been variations on the column-and-pod model, while a number of towers built overseas since Sydney 5 have been designed as civic markers.

 


 

VICTORIA

 

Moonee Valley City

 

Essendon Airport Air Traffic Control Tower:

 

Located at Essendon Airport, Strathmore, comprising the area identified on Lease Plan as Parcel 1 Federal Airports Corporation C/T 8497/680 (Part).


 

Criterion

Values

(a)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural

history

Essendon Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower is of historical significance for its association with a major programme undertaken in the 1950s by the Australian Government in developing standardised air traffic control facilities across Australia. Essendon is one of three surviving operational (and two decommissioned) ATC towers in Australia – Hobart and Launceston are operational; Tamworth and Adelaide have been decommissioned – built during the 1950s to accommodate equipment and services based on guidelines devised by the International Civil Aviation Organization. It is now thought to be the earliest surviving example of this group. When commissioned, it formed part of an experimental system for the control of civil aircraft at Melbourne Airport, which was at the time one of the busiest airports in the British Empire. This system comprised the air traffic control tower, remote VHF repeater and flight progress board. At the time of its design and installation, the system was envisaged as a prototype to be replicated throughout the air routes of eastern Australia.

 

(b)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural

 or cultural history

The Essendon Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower is a relatively rare example of a standard 1950s ATC tower type.

(d)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's      natural or cultural environments

The Essendon Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower is a representative and relatively intact example of a standard ATC tower type surviving from the 1950s. Other examples are at Launceston, Hobart, Tamworth, and Adelaide. Later towers adopted a similar form as the typology evolved (see Rockhampton, Cairns and the towers of the later 1960s).

 


 

SOUTH AUSTRALIA

 

Salisbury City

 

Parafield Airport Air Traffic Control Tower:

 

Located at Parafield Airport, Parafield, corner Kittyhawk Lane and Anderson Drive, comprising that part of land comprised in Certificate of Title Register Book Volume 5207 Folio 885 Marked A in GP Plan No. 437 of 1994.


 

Criterion

Values

(a)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural

history

The Parafield Air Traffic Control tower has a strong historical association with a key phase in the development of air traffic control services in Australia, being one of three almost identical integrated Operations and Administration buildings constructed at major airports in Australian capital cities between 1939 and 1941 (the others were at Mascot (Sydney) and Archerfield (Brisbane)).

 

The Parafield example is distinguished from those at Archerfield and Mascot in that it retains its original function, albeit with a 1981 cabin. It is likely that the building has been associated with the provision of air traffic control for longer than any other surviving building in Australia.

 

(b)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural

 or cultural history

Accepting the loss of the original Air Traffic Control cabin, the Parafield Air Traffic Control tower stands as a rare surviving example of an early (pre-WWII) air traffic control facility, in this case integrated into a larger terminal and operations building. Three examples of this integrated model were built prior to the outbreak of World War II. While all three survive in various states of intactness, all are considered rare in a national context, both in terms of early air traffic control facilities and, more broadly, early aviation facilities.

 

 

(d)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's      natural or cultural environments

Representative example of a control tower typology considered important in the history of the building type.

 


 

TASMANIA

Clarence City

 

Hobart Airport Air Traffic Control Tower:

 

Located at Hobart Airport, Cambridge, comprising such part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title Volume 112358 Folio 1.


 

Criterion

Values

(a)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural

history

Hobart Air Traffic Control tower is of historical significance for its association with a major programme undertaken in the 1950s by the Australian Government in developing standardised air traffic control facilities across Australia. It is one of three surviving operational and two decommissioned ATC towers in Australia built during the 1950s to accommodate equipment and services based on guidelines devised by the International Civil Aviation Organization.

 

Drawings from 1951 indicate that Hobart Tower was designed concurrently with the earliest post-World War II towers, including Essendon (the oldest survivor), Brisbane 2 and Sydney 3 (both demolished), but that it was not constructed until 1956-58, and then in an amended form.  The early-mid 1950s was a formative period in the evolution of air traffic control facilities in Australia. Towers of this era are generally characterised by a degree of experimentation and invention. This generation of control towers formed the stylistic prototype for towers built throughout Australia and Papua New Guinea during the 1960s and early-1970s.

 

(b)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural

 or cultural history

Hobart Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower is a relatively rare surviving example of a standard ATC tower type surviving from the 1950s.

(d)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's      natural or cultural environments

Hobart tower is a representative and relatively intact example of a standard Air Traffic Control tower type surviving from the 1950s. Other examples are at Essendon, Launceston, Tamworth, and Adelaide. Later towers adopted a similar form as the typology evolved (see Rockhampton, Cairns, Mount Isa and the towers of the later 1960s).

 


 

 

Northern Midlands Municipality

 

Launceston Airport Air Traffic Control Tower:

 

Located at Launceston Airport, Launceston, Evandale Road, comprising such part of the land comprised in Certificate of Title Volume 198334 Folio 1.


 

Criterion

Values

(a)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

importance in the course, or pattern, of Australia's natural or cultural

history

Launceston Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower is of historical significance for its association with a major programme undertaken in the 1950s by the Australian Government in developing standardised air traffic control facilities across Australia. It is one of three surviving operational and two decommissioned ATC towers in Australia built during the 1950s to accommodate equipment and services based on guidelines devised by the International Civil Aviation Organization.

 

The early-mid 1950s was a formative period in the evolution of air traffic       control facilities in Australia. Towers of this era are generally characterised by a degree of experimentation and invention. This generation of control towers formed the stylistic prototype for towers built throughout Australia and Papua New Guinea until the late-1960s.

 

(b)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 possession of uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of Australia's natural

 or cultural history

Launceston Air Traffic Control (ATC) tower is a relatively rare example of a standard ATC tower type surviving from the 1950s.

(d)

the place has significant heritage value because of the place's

 importance in demonstrating the principal characteristics of: (i) a class of Australia's natural or cultural places; or (ii) a class of Australia's      natural or cultural environments

Notwithstanding a level of physical change, Launceston remains a representative and broadly intact example of a standard Air Traffic Control tower type surviving from the 1950s. Other examples are at Essendon, Hobart, Tamworth, and Adelaide. Later towers adopted a similar form as the typology evolved (see Rockhampton, Cairns, Mount Isa and the towers of the later 1960s).

 

For more information on any of the above places search the Australian Heritage Database at http://www.environment.gov.au/cgi-bin/ahdb/search.pl using the name of the place.