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Trans-Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997

Authoritative Version
  • - C2012C00901
  • In force - Superseded Version
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Act No. 190 of 1997 as amended, taking into account amendments up to Trans-Tasman Mutual Recognition (Amendment of Act) Regulation 2012
An Act to provide for the recognition within Australia of regulatory standards adopted in New Zealand regarding goods and occupations
Administered by: Industry
Registered 14 Dec 2012
Start Date 12 Dec 2012
End Date 07 Aug 2013
Table of contents.

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997

Act No. 190 of 1997 as amended

This compilation was prepared on 12 December 2012
taking into account amendments up to Act No. 8 of 2007
and SLI 2012 No. 303

The text of any of those amendments not in force
on that date is appended in the Notes section

The operation of amendments that have been incorporated may be
affected by application provisions that are set out in the Notes section

Prepared by the Office of Parliamentary Counsel, Canberra

  

  

  


Contents

Part 1—Preliminary                                                                                                             1

1............ Short title [see Note 1]........................................................................ 1

2............ Commencement [see Note 1].............................................................. 1

3............ Principal purpose................................................................................ 1

4............ Interpretation....................................................................................... 2

5............ Operation of this Act in relation to the Commonwealth...................... 4

6............ Operation of this Act in relation to the States...................................... 5

7............ Operation of this Act in relation to New Zealand................................ 5

8............ Crown bound...................................................................................... 5

Part 2—Goods                                                                                                                          6

9............ Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle........................................ 6

10.......... Entitlement to sell goods..................................................................... 6

11.......... Requirements that do not need to be complied with............................ 6

12.......... Requirements that do need to be complied with.................................. 7

13.......... Defences to offences regarding sale.................................................... 8

14.......... Goods that comply with local law....................................................... 8

Part 3—Occupations                                                                                                            9

Division 1—Preliminary                                                                                              9

15.......... Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle........................................ 9

16.......... Entitlement to carry on occupation...................................................... 9

17.......... Application of this Part....................................................................... 9

Division 2—Entitlement to registration                                                            11

18.......... Notification to local registration authority......................................... 11

19.......... Entitlement to registration and continued registration........................ 12

20.......... Action following notice..................................................................... 13

21.......... Postponement of registration............................................................. 13

22.......... Refusal of registration....................................................................... 14

23.......... Notification of decision..................................................................... 14

Division 3—Interim arrangements                                                                      15

24.......... Deemed registration.......................................................................... 15

25.......... Duration of deemed registration........................................................ 15

26.......... Activities under deemed registration................................................. 16

Division 4—Equivalent occupations                                                                   18

27.......... Equivalent occupations...................................................................... 18

28.......... General principle............................................................................... 18

29.......... Declarations as to equivalent occupations......................................... 18

30.......... Declarations by Australian Tribunal.................................................. 18

31.......... Declarations by Ministers................................................................. 20

Division 5—General provisions                                                                            21

32.......... Disciplinary action............................................................................ 21

33.......... Review of decisions.......................................................................... 21

34.......... Costs................................................................................................. 22

35.......... Co‑operation with and membership of Trans‑Tasman Occupations Tribunal (NZ)  22

36.......... Residence or domicile....................................................................... 23

37.......... Furnishing information..................................................................... 23

38.......... Receiving information....................................................................... 24

39.......... General responsibilities of local registration authorities.................... 24

40.......... Fees................................................................................................... 25

41.......... Formalities requiring personal attendance......................................... 25

42.......... Saving............................................................................................... 25

Part 4—Exclusions and exemptions                                                                          26

43.......... References to endorsing a proposed regulation................................. 26

44.......... Exclusions......................................................................................... 26

45.......... Permanent exemptions...................................................................... 27

46.......... Temporary exemptions...................................................................... 27

47.......... Continuation of temporary exemptions to enable implementation of ministerial agreements    28

48.......... Special exemptions............................................................................ 29

49.......... Exemptions relating to occupations................................................... 30

Part 5—General                                                                                                                    31

50.......... References to participating jurisdictions............................................ 31

51.......... Application of Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle............... 31

52.......... Machinery provisions regarding limitations etc................................. 31

53.......... Determining place of production....................................................... 32

54.......... Commonwealth regulations for temporary exemptions..................... 32

Schedule 1—Exclusions                                                                                                    33

Part 1—Introduction                                                                                                          33

1............ Excluded laws................................................................................... 33

Part 2—Laws                                                                                                                          34

2............ Customs controls and tariffs (including laws relating to international obligations)   34

3............ Intellectual property (including laws relating to the Paris Convention of 20 March 1983 for the Protection of Industrial Property)........................................................................................... 34

4............ Other international obligations.......................................................... 35

5............ Taxation and business franchises...................................................... 36

Schedule 2—Permanent exemptions                                                                        37

Part 1—Laws relating to goods: general                                                                37

1............ Quarantine......................................................................................... 37

2............ Endangered species........................................................................... 37

Part 2—Laws relating to goods: specific                                                                38

3............ Commonwealth................................................................................. 38

4............ New South Wales............................................................................. 39

5............ Victoria............................................................................................. 40

6............ Queensland....................................................................................... 41

7............ Western Australia.............................................................................. 42

8............ South Australia................................................................................. 44

9............ Tasmania........................................................................................... 45

10.......... Australian Capital Territory............................................................... 46

11.......... Northern Territory............................................................................. 47

Schedule 3—Special exemptions                                                                                 49

Schedule 4—Exempt laws relating to occupations                                           50

1............ Exempt laws...................................................................................... 50

2............ Medical practitioners......................................................................... 50

Schedule 5—Privacy of information collected under the Act                   51

Part 1—Interpretation                                                                                                      51

1............ Interpretation..................................................................................... 51

Part 2—Principles                                                                                                                53

2............ Solicitation of personal information from individual
concerned.......................................................................................... 53

3............ Storage and security of personal information.................................... 53

4............ Limits on use of personal information............................................... 53

5............ Limits on disclosure for personal information................................... 54

Notes                                                                                                                                             57


An Act to provide for the recognition within Australia of regulatory standards adopted in New Zealand regarding goods and occupations

Part 1Preliminary

1  Short title [see Note 1]

                   This Act may be cited as the Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997.

2  Commencement [see Note 1]

             (1)  This Part commences on the day on which this Act receives the Royal Assent.

             (2)  The remaining provisions of this Act commence on a day or days to be fixed by Proclamation.

3  Principal purpose

             (1)  The principal purpose of this Act is to enact legislation authorised by the Parliaments of States under paragraph (xxxvii) of section 51 of the Commonwealth Constitution, and requested by the legislatures of the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory, for the purpose of recognising within Australia regulatory standards adopted in New Zealand regarding goods and occupations.

             (2)  The legislation is as contemplated by the Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Arrangement entered into on 9 July 1996 between the Commonwealth of Australia, New Zealand, the States of New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, Western Australia, South Australia and Tasmania, the Australian Capital Territory and the Northern Territory.

4  Interpretation

             (1)  In this Act, unless the contrary intention appears:

Australia means Australia in a geographical sense, and does not include the external territories.

Australian jurisdiction means a participating jurisdiction, other than New Zealand.

Australian Tribunal means the Administrative Appeals Tribunal or a successor to that body.

conditions, when used in relation to occupations, means conditions, limitations or restrictions.

deemed registration means deemed registration as defined in section 24.

designated person means:

                     (a)  for New Zealand—a Minister of the Crown for New Zealand; or

                     (b)  for the Commonwealth—the Governor‑General of Australia; or

                     (c)  for a State (other than a Territory)—the Governor of the State or a Minister of the Crown for the State; or

                     (d)  for the Australian Capital Territory—the Chief Minister for the Territory; or

                     (e)  for the Northern Territory—the Administrator of the Territory.

equivalent, when used in relation to occupations, has a meaning affected by Division 4 of Part 3.

goods means goods of any kind, and includes:

                     (a)  animals or plants; or

                     (b)  material of microbial origin; or

                     (c)  a package containing goods; or

                     (d)  a label attached to goods.

grant, when used in relation to registration, means grant, issue or otherwise confer registration.

import into an Australian jurisdiction means import from outside Australia.

labelling of goods includes any means by which, at the point of sale, information is attached to goods or is displayed in relation to goods without being attached to them.

local registration authority of a participating jurisdiction for an occupation means the person or authority in the jurisdiction having the function conferred by legislation of registering persons in connection with their carrying on that occupation in the jurisdiction.

New Zealand has the meaning given by the Acts Interpretation Act 1924 of New Zealand, as in force from time to time.

New Zealand Act means the Act of the Parliament of New Zealand (as amended and in force from time to time) that deals with Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition and corresponds to this Act, and includes any Act replacing that Act (as amended and in force from time to time).

New Zealand Tribunal means the Trans‑Tasman Occupations Tribunal of New Zealand or a successor to that body.

occupation means an occupation, trade, profession or calling of any kind that may be carried on only by registered persons, where registration is wholly or partly dependent on the attainment or possession of some qualification (for example, training, education, examination, experience, character or being fit or proper), and includes a specialisation in any of the above in which registration may be granted.

participating jurisdiction has the meaning given by section 50.

produce includes to manufacture, and also includes to harvest or otherwise produce in the course of any form of primary production.

registration includes the licensing, approval, admission, certification (including by way of practising certificates), or any other form of authorisation, of a person required by or under legislation for carrying on an occupation.

requirements, when used in relation to goods, means requirements, prohibitions, restrictions or conditions.

sell includes sell by wholesale or retail, and includes distribute for sale, expose or offer for sale or have in possession for sale or agree to sell, and includes barter, and includes supply by way of exchange, lease, hire or hire‑purchase.

State includes the Australian Capital Territory or the Northern Territory.

substantive registration means registration under a law of a participating jurisdiction, but does not include deemed registration.

             (2)  A law specified or described in a Schedule to this Act includes (unless otherwise stated in the Schedule) any relevant regulations or other statutory instruments under that law.

             (3)  A law specified or described in a Schedule to this Act, including any relevant regulations or other statutory instruments under that law, includes (unless otherwise stated in the Schedule) any amendment or replacement of that law, but only to the extent that the effect of the amendment or replacement does not restrict the scope of this Act.

             (4)  A reference in this Act to the designated person is, in relation to a participating jurisdiction for which there is or can be more than one designated person, a reference to any one of them.

             (5)  This Act is to be interpreted in accordance with the Acts Interpretation Act 1901 as in force at the date on which this Act receives the Royal Assent.

5  Operation of this Act in relation to the Commonwealth

             (1)  Subject to this section:

                     (a)  this Act has effect despite anything in any other law of the Commonwealth enacted or made before the commencement of this section; and

                     (b)  any law of the Commonwealth enacted or made after the commencement of this section is to be construed as having effect subject to this Act, except where that law expressly overrides this Act.

             (2)  Subject to subsection 51(2), nothing in this Act affects the operation of the Mutual Recognition Act 1992.

6  Operation of this Act in relation to the States

             (1)  This Act applies to a State, but only while it is a participating jurisdiction.

             (2)  Accordingly, a reference in this Act to a State is a reference to a State that is a participating jurisdiction, and this Act does not affect the operation of the laws of a State that is not a participating jurisdiction.

             (3)  This Act does not affect the operation of a law of a State so far as it can operate concurrently with this Act.

7  Operation of this Act in relation to New Zealand

             (1)  The Governor‑General may declare by Proclamation that this Act will cease to have effect on a specified day, if satisfied that:

                     (a)  New Zealand is not a participating jurisdiction and is not likely to become a participating jurisdiction in the near future; or

                     (b)  New Zealand is a participating jurisdiction but is likely to cease to be a participating jurisdiction in the near future.

             (2)  Such a Proclamation cannot be made unless the designated person for each of the participating jurisdictions (other than New Zealand and the Commonwealth) has published a notice in the official gazette of the jurisdiction requesting the making of the Proclamation.

             (3)  Such a Proclamation is effective according to its terms.

8  Crown bound

                   Subject to section 6, this Act binds the Crown in right of the Commonwealth and of each of the States.


 

Part 2Goods

  

9  Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle

             (1)  The Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle as applying to goods is as set out in this Part.

             (2)  This Part deals with goods produced in or imported into New Zealand and their sale in Australia.

10  Entitlement to sell goods

                   The Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle is that, subject to this Part, goods produced in or imported into New Zealand, that may lawfully be sold in New Zealand, either generally or in particular circumstances, may, by virtue of this Act, be sold in an Australian jurisdiction either generally or in particular circumstances (as the case may be), without the necessity for compliance with further requirements imposed by or under the law of that jurisdiction as described in section 11.

11  Requirements that do not need to be complied with

                   The further requirements referred to in section 10 are any one or more of the following requirements relating to sale that are imposed by or under the law of the Australian jurisdiction concerned:

                     (a)  a requirement that the goods satisfy standards of the jurisdiction relating to the goods themselves, including for example requirements relating to their production, composition, quality or performance;

                     (b)  a requirement that the goods satisfy standards of the jurisdiction relating to the way the goods are presented, including for example requirements relating to their packaging, labelling, date stamping or age;

                     (c)  a requirement that the goods be inspected, passed or similarly dealt with in or for the purposes of the jurisdiction;

                     (d)  a requirement that any step in the production of the goods not occur outside the jurisdiction;

                     (e)  any other requirement relating to sale that would prevent or restrict, or would have the effect of preventing or restricting, the sale of the goods in the jurisdiction.

12  Requirements that do need to be complied with

             (1)  The Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle is subject to the exceptions specified in this section.

             (2)  The first exception is that the principle does not affect the operation of any laws of an Australian jurisdiction that regulate the manner of the sale of goods in the jurisdiction or the manner in which sellers conduct or are required to conduct their business in the jurisdiction (including laws set out in the examples below), so long as those laws apply equally to goods produced in or imported into the jurisdiction.

Examples:  Laws relating to the following:

                                     (a)   the contractual aspects of the sale of goods;

                                    (b)   the registration of sellers or other persons carrying on occupations;

                                     (c)   the requirement for business franchise licences;

                                    (d)   the persons to whom goods may or may not be sold;

                                     (e)   the circumstances in which goods may or may not be sold.

             (3)  The second exception is that the principle does not affect the operation of any laws of an Australian jurisdiction regarding the transportation, storage or handling of goods within the jurisdiction, so long as:

                     (a)  those laws apply equally to goods produced in or imported into the jurisdiction; and

                     (b)  those laws are directed at matters affecting health and safety of persons in the jurisdiction or at preventing, minimising or regulating environmental pollution (including air, water, noise or soil pollution) in the jurisdiction.

             (4)  The third exception is that the principle does not affect the operation of any laws of an Australian jurisdiction regarding the inspection of goods within the jurisdiction, so long as:

                     (a)  inspection or the requirement for inspection is not a prerequisite to the sale of the goods in the jurisdiction; and

                     (b)  those laws apply equally to goods produced in or imported into the jurisdiction; and

                     (c)  those laws are directed at matters affecting the health and safety of persons in the jurisdiction or at preventing, minimising or regulating environmental pollution (including air, water, noise or soil pollution) in the jurisdiction.

13  Defences to offences regarding sale

             (1)  It is a defence to a prosecution for an offence against a law of an Australian jurisdiction in relation to the sale of any goods if the defendant expressly claims that the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle applies and establishes that:

                     (a)  the goods were labelled at the point of sale with a statement to the effect that the goods were produced in or imported into New Zealand; and

                     (b)  the defendant had no reasonable grounds for suspecting that they were not so produced or imported.

             (2)  The defence is not available if the prosecution proves that the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle did not apply in the circumstances of the alleged offence (because for example the goods did not comply with requirements imposed by the law of New Zealand).

             (3)  Any relevant presumptions or evidentiary procedures under the law of New Zealand are available to the prosecution or defendant in relation to matters sought to be proved by the prosecution under subsection (2).

             (4)  Any relevant defences under the law of New Zealand are available to the defendant in relation to matters sought to be proved by the prosecution under subsection (2).

             (5)  This section does not affect any defence that is available apart from this section.

14  Goods that comply with local law

                   Nothing in this Part prevents goods from being sold in an Australian jurisdiction if (apart from this Act) they comply with the relevant requirements of the law in force in the jurisdiction.


 

Part 3Occupations

Division 1Preliminary

15  Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle

             (1)  The Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle as applying to occupations is as set out in this Part.

             (2)  This Part deals with the ability of a person who is registered in connection with an occupation in New Zealand to carry on an equivalent occupation in Australia.

16  Entitlement to carry on occupation

             (1)  The Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle is that, subject to this Part, a person who is registered in New Zealand for an occupation is, by virtue of this Act, entitled after notifying the local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction for the equivalent occupation:

                     (a)  to be registered in the jurisdiction for the equivalent occupation; and

                     (b)  pending such registration, to carry on the equivalent occupation in the jurisdiction.

             (2)  However, the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle is subject to the exception that it does not affect the operation of laws that regulate the manner of carrying on an occupation in an Australian jurisdiction, so long as those laws:

                     (a)  apply equally to all persons carrying on or seeking to carry on the occupation under the law of the jurisdiction; and

                     (b)  are not based on the attainment or possession of some qualification or experience relating to fitness to carry on the occupation.

17  Application of this Part

             (1)  This Part applies to individuals and occupations carried on by them.

             (2)  This Part extends to an occupation carried on by an individual, where the individual is subject to more than one system of registration or more than one local registration authority in a participating jurisdiction, and accordingly this Part applies in relation to each such system of registration and each such authority.

             (3)  Without limiting subsection (2), an example of such an occupation is that of a legal practitioner, which involves both the admission as a legal practitioner by a court and the issue of a practising certificate by another body.

 

Division 2Entitlement to registration

18  Notification to local registration authority

             (1)  A person who is registered in New Zealand for an occupation may lodge a written notice with the local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction for the equivalent occupation, seeking registration for the equivalent occupation in accordance with the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle.

             (2)  The notice must:

                     (a)  state that the person is registered for the occupation in New Zealand; and

                     (b)  state the occupation for which registration is sought and that it is being sought in accordance with the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle; and

                     (c)  specify all the participating jurisdictions in which the person has substantive registration for equivalent occupations; and

                     (d)  state that the person is not the subject of disciplinary proceedings in any participating jurisdiction (including any preliminary investigations or action that might lead to disciplinary proceedings) in relation to those occupations; and

                     (e)  state that the person's registration in any participating jurisdiction is not cancelled or currently suspended as a result of disciplinary action; and

                      (f)  state that the person is not otherwise personally prohibited from carrying on any such occupation in any participating jurisdiction, and is not subject to any special conditions in carrying on that occupation, as a result of criminal, civil or disciplinary proceedings in any participating jurisdiction; and

                     (g)  specify any special conditions to which the person is subject in carrying on any such occupation in any participating jurisdiction; and

                     (h)  give consent to the making of inquiries of, and the exchange of information with, the authorities of any participating jurisdiction regarding the person's activities in the relevant occupation or occupations or otherwise regarding matters relevant to the notice.

             (3)  The notice must be accompanied by a document that is either the original or a copy of the instrument evidencing the person's existing registration (or, if there is no such instrument, by sufficient information to identify the person and the person's registration).

             (4)  As regards the instrument evidencing the person's existing registration, the person must certify in the notice that the accompanying document is the original or a complete and accurate copy of the original.

             (5)  The statements and other information in the notice must be verified by statutory declaration.

             (6)  The local registration authority may permit the notice to be amended after it is lodged.

19  Entitlement to registration and continued registration

             (1)  A person who lodges a notice under section 18 with a local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction is entitled to be registered in the equivalent occupation, as if the law of the jurisdiction that deals with registration expressly provided that registration in New Zealand is a sufficient ground of entitlement to registration.

             (2)  The local registration authority may grant registration on that ground and may grant renewals of such registration.

             (3)  Once a person is registered on that ground, the entitlement to registration continues, whether or not registration (including any renewal of registration) ceases in New Zealand.

             (4)  Continuance of registration is otherwise subject to the laws of the jurisdiction, to the extent to which those laws:

                     (a)  apply equally to all persons carrying on or seeking to carry on the occupation under the law of the jurisdiction; and

                     (b)  are not based on the attainment or possession of some qualification or experience relating to fitness to carry on the occupation.

             (5)  The local registration authority may impose conditions on registration, but may not impose conditions that are more onerous than would be imposed in similar circumstances (having regard to relevant qualifications and experience) if it were registration effected apart from this Part, unless they are conditions that apply to the person's registration in New Zealand or that are necessary to achieve equivalence of occupations.

             (6)  This section has effect subject to this Part.

20  Action following notice

             (1)  Registration must be granted within one month after the notice is lodged with the local registration authority under section 18.

             (2)  When granted, registration takes effect as from the date the notice was lodged.

             (3)  However, the local registration authority may, subject to this Part and within one month after the notice was lodged, postpone or refuse the grant of registration.

             (4)  If the local registration authority neither grants the registration nor takes action under subsection (3) within the period of one month after the notice is lodged, the person is entitled to registration immediately at the end of that period and no objection may be taken to the notice on any of the grounds on which refusal or postponement may be effected, except where fraud is involved.

21  Postponement of registration

             (1)  A local registration authority may postpone the grant of registration, if:

                     (a)  any of the statements or information in the notice as required by section 18 are materially false or misleading; or

                     (b)  any document or information as required by section 18(3) has not been provided or is materially false or misleading; or

                     (c)  the circumstances of the person lodging the notice have materially changed since the date of the notice or the date it was lodged; or

                     (d)  the authority decides that the occupation in which registration is sought is not an equivalent occupation.

             (2)  If the grant of registration has been postponed, the local registration authority may in due course grant or refuse the registration.

             (3)  The local registration authority may not postpone the grant of registration for longer than a period of 6 months, and the person is entitled to registration immediately, at the end of that period, unless registration was refused at or before the end of that period.

             (4)  Nothing in subsection (3) prevents earlier registration from being granted on a review by the Australian Tribunal.

22  Refusal of registration

             (1)  A local registration authority may refuse the grant of registration, if:

                     (a)  any of the statements or information in the notice as required by section 18 are materially false or misleading; or

                     (b)  any document or information as required by section 18(3) has not been provided or is materially false or misleading; or

                     (c)  the authority decides that the occupation in which registration is sought is not an equivalent occupation and equivalence cannot be achieved by the imposition of conditions.

             (2)  A decision to refuse to grant registration on the ground that the occupation in which registration is sought is not an equivalent occupation takes effect at the end of a specified period (not less than 2 weeks) after the person is notified of the decision, unless it has been previously revoked or there is an application for review to the Australian Tribunal, in which case the Tribunal may make whatever orders it considers appropriate.

23  Notification of decision

                   A local registration authority must give the person who lodges a notice in accordance with section 18 a notice in writing of its decision to grant registration, or to postpone or refuse the grant of registration, or to impose conditions on registration.

 

Division 3Interim arrangements

24  Deemed registration

             (1)  A person who lodges a notice under section 18 with a local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction is, pending the grant or refusal of registration, taken to be registered as provided in section 19.

             (2)  Such registration is called deemed registration in this Act.

             (3)  Deemed registration in one Australian jurisdiction does not of itself provide a basis for registration in another Australian jurisdiction.

25  Duration of deemed registration

             (1)  A person's deemed registration in an Australian jurisdiction continues until it is cancelled or suspended or otherwise ceases in accordance with this Part.

             (2)  A person's deemed registration in an Australian jurisdiction ceases if the person becomes substantively registered in the jurisdiction in connection with the occupation concerned.

             (3)  A person's deemed registration in an Australian jurisdiction ceases if the local registration authority of the jurisdiction refuses to grant registration, subject to any determination of the Australian Tribunal.

             (4)  A person's deemed registration in an Australian jurisdiction ceases if the person ceases to be substantively registered in every other participating jurisdiction mentioned in the notice as required by section 18(2)(c).

             (5)  A local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction may cancel a person's deemed registration in the jurisdiction if the person requests cancellation.

             (6)  Deemed registration is not affected by postponement of the grant of substantive registration.

26  Activities under deemed registration

             (1)  A person who has deemed registration in an Australian jurisdiction may carry on the occupation in the jurisdiction as if the deemed registration were substantive registration in the jurisdiction.

             (2)  However, the person may do so only:

                     (a)  within the limits conferred by the person's substantive registration in New Zealand; and

                     (b)  within the limits conferred by the person's deemed registration in the Australian jurisdiction; and

                     (c)  subject to any conditions or undertakings applying to the person's registration in New Zealand, unless waived by the local registration authority of the Australian jurisdiction under this section; and

                     (d)  subject to any conditions applying to the person's deemed registration.

             (3)  Without limiting anything in this Division:

                     (a)  the person may not carry on the occupation in the Australian jurisdiction without complying with any requirements regarding insurance, fidelity funds, trust accounts and the like that are designed to protect the public, clients, customers or others; and

                     (b)  a person who has deemed registration in an occupation in the Australian jurisdiction is subject to any disciplinary provisions and arrangements that are applicable to persons who are substantively registered in the jurisdiction; and

                     (c)  references in the law of the Australian jurisdiction to persons registered in an occupation under the law of the jurisdiction (however expressed) extend to persons who have deemed registration for the occupation under this Act.

             (4)  However, the local registration authority of the Australian jurisdiction may waive any condition imposed under the law of New Zealand, or any undertaking given to the local registration authority of New Zealand, if it thinks it appropriate in the circumstances.

             (5)  The local registration authority of the Australian jurisdiction may impose conditions as if deemed registration were substantive registration, but it must not impose conditions that are more onerous than would be imposed in similar circumstances (having regard to relevant qualifications and experience) if it were registration effected apart from this Part, unless they correspond to conditions or undertakings that apply to the person's registration in New Zealand or that are necessary to achieve equivalence of occupations.

 

Division 4Equivalent occupations

27  Equivalent occupations

                   The equivalence of occupations carried on in different participating jurisdictions is, for the purposes of this Act, to be determined in accordance with this Part.

28  General principle

             (1)  An occupation for which persons may be registered in New Zealand is taken to be equivalent to an occupation for which persons may be registered in an Australian jurisdiction if the activities authorised to be carried out under each registration are substantially the same (whether or not this result is achieved by means of the imposition of conditions).

             (2)  Conditions may be imposed on registration under this Part so as to achieve equivalence between occupations in different participating jurisdictions.

             (3)  This section has effect subject to any relevant declarations in force under this Division.

29  Declarations as to equivalent occupations

             (1)  This Part is to be given effect in accordance with relevant declarations (if any) made under this Division regarding equivalent occupations.

             (2)  If a declaration made by the Australian Tribunal under section 30 and a declaration made by Ministers under section 31 are inconsistent, the ministerial declaration prevails.

             (3)  A declaration under this Part does not affect the registration of any person already registered (except in the case of a declaration made by the Australian Tribunal in relation to that person specifically).

30  Declarations by Australian Tribunal

             (1)  On a review, the Australian Tribunal may make an order that a person who is registered in a particular occupation in New Zealand is or is not entitled to registration in an Australian jurisdiction in a particular occupation, and may specify or describe conditions that will achieve equivalence.

             (2)  On a review, the Australian Tribunal may make a declaration that occupations carried on in New Zealand and an Australian jurisdiction are not equivalent, but only if the Australian Tribunal is satisfied that:

                     (a)  the activities involved in the occupations are not substantially the same (even with the imposition of conditions); or

                     (b)  registration in New Zealand should not entitle registered persons to carry on a particular activity or class of activity in an Australian jurisdiction, where:

                              (i)  the activity or class of activity is a material part of the practice of a person registered in New Zealand for the occupation; and

                             (ii)  the activity or class of activity, if carried out by a person not conforming to the appropriate standards, could reasonably be expected to expose persons in the Australian jurisdiction to a real threat to their health or safety or could reasonably be expected to cause significant environmental pollution (including air, water, noise or soil pollution); and

                            (iii)  it is not practicable to protect the health or safety of such persons from that threat or the environment from such pollution by regulating the manner in which services in the occupation are provided.

             (3)  The Registrar or other proper officer of the Australian Tribunal must cause a notice setting out the terms of a declaration under this section to be promptly published in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette.

             (4)  A declaration made on the basis of paragraph (2)(b) has effect for no longer than 12 months, and the local registration authority must promptly notify appropriate authorities in each other participating jurisdiction of the declaration.

             (5)  The local registration authority is to give effect to the decision on the review, and must thereafter act in conformity with the decision in relation to other persons seeking registration.

31  Declarations by Ministers

             (1)  A Minister from New Zealand and a Minister from each of one or more Australian jurisdictions may jointly declare, by notice in the Commonwealth of Australia Gazette, that specified occupations are equivalent, and may specify or describe conditions that will achieve equivalence.

             (2)  The declaration may be amended or rescinded in the same way.

             (3)  The declaration has effect only in relation to the participating jurisdictions concerned.

             (4)  The appropriate local registration authority is to give effect to the declaration.

 

Division 5General provisions

32  Disciplinary action

             (1)  If a person's registration in an occupation in New Zealand:

                     (a)  is cancelled or suspended; or

                     (b)  is subject to a condition;

on disciplinary grounds, or as a result of or in anticipation of criminal, civil or disciplinary proceedings, then the person's registration in the equivalent occupation in an Australian jurisdiction is affected in the same way.

             (2)  However, the local registration authority of the Australian jurisdiction may reinstate any cancelled or suspended registration or waive any such condition if it thinks it appropriate in the circumstances.

             (3)  This section extends to registration effected apart from this Act.

             (4)  This section has effect despite any other provisions of this Part.

33  Review of decisions

             (1)  Subject to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975, application may be made to the Australian Tribunal for review of a decision of a local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction in relation to its functions under this Act.

             (2)  In subsection (1):

decision has the same meaning as in the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975.

             (3)  If a local registration authority gives a person written notice of the making of a decision referred to in subsection (1), the notice must include a statement to the effect that:

                     (a)  subject to the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975, application for review of the decision may be made to the Australian Tribunal by a person whose interests are affected by the decision; and

                     (b)  except where subsection 28(4) of that Act applies, application may be made in accordance with section 28 of that Act by or on behalf of that person for a statement in writing setting out the findings on material questions of fact, referring to the evidence or other material on which those findings were based, and giving the reasons for the decision.

             (4)  Any failure to comply with a requirement of subsection (3) does not affect the validity of the decision.

34  Costs

                   The Australian Tribunal may order a party in proceedings before it to pay costs if the party has acted unreasonably.

35  Co‑operation with and membership of Trans‑Tasman Occupations Tribunal (NZ)

             (1)  The purpose of this section is to promote consistency between decisions made by the Australian Tribunal for the purposes of this Act and decisions made by the New Zealand Tribunal for the purposes of the New Zealand Act.

             (2)  In making decisions for the purposes of this Act, the Australian Tribunal is to have regard to decisions of the New Zealand Tribunal.

             (3)  For the purposes of a review of a decision referred to in subsection 33(1) of this Act, the President of the Australian Tribunal may, in the exercise of the power under subsection 20B(1) of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975, direct that the persons who are to constitute the Australian Tribunal for the purposes of that review include:

                     (a)  the Chairperson of the New Zealand Tribunal; or

                     (b)  a person included on the panel maintained under the New Zealand Act who is nominated by the Chairperson of the New Zealand Tribunal for the purposes of that review.

             (4)  The President of the Australian Tribunal must exercise the power given by subsection (3) in accordance with arrangements made from time to time between the President and the Chairperson of the New Zealand Tribunal.

             (5)  A reference in any of the following provisions to a member includes a reference to a person included in a direction under subsection (3) of this section:

                     (a)  the definition of authorised member in subsection 3(1) of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975;

                     (b)  Part III, IIIA, IV or VI of the Administrative Appeals Tribunal Act 1975.

             (6)  In spite of anything in any other Act, the Chairperson of the New Zealand Tribunal, or a person included on the panel maintained under the New Zealand Act, is not entitled to remuneration or allowances in respect of service as a member of the Australian Tribunal as permitted by this Act.

             (7)  Service by a member of the Australian Tribunal on the New Zealand Tribunal under the New Zealand Act is taken for all purposes of Australian law to be service as a member of the Australian Tribunal.

36  Residence or domicile

                   Residence or domicile in a particular participating jurisdiction is not to be a prerequisite for or a factor in entitlement to the grant, renewal or continuation of registration arising under this Part.

37  Furnishing information

             (1)  A local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction must furnish without delay any information reasonably required by a local registration authority of another participating jurisdiction about a person substantively registered under a law of the Australian jurisdiction.

             (2)  The obligation imposed under this section does not apply unless the authority of the other participating jurisdiction notifies the authority of the firstmentioned jurisdiction that the information is required in connection with:

                     (a)  a notice lodged by a person seeking registration; or

                     (b)  a person's deemed registration; or

                     (c)  actual or possible disciplinary action against the person.

             (3)  The authority of the firstmentioned jurisdiction is empowered to provide the information, despite any law relating to secrecy, confidentiality or privacy.

             (4)  Nothing in this section affects any obligation or power to provide information apart from this section.

38  Receiving information

                   If a local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction receives information under section 37 of this Act or the corresponding provision of the New Zealand Act, the information is subject to any law relating to secrecy, confidentiality or privacy that would apply if the information were provided under the law of the jurisdiction under which the authority is constituted or exercises its functions.

39  General responsibilities of local registration authorities

             (1)  It is the duty of each local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction to facilitate the operation of this Part in relation to the occupations for which the authority is responsible, and in particular to make use of the power to impose conditions in such a way as to promote the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle.

             (2)  It is the duty of each local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction to prepare and make available guidelines and information regarding the operation of this Part in relation to the occupations for which the authority is responsible.

             (3)  The first such guidelines and information are to be available within 6 months after the commencement of this section.

             (4)  In dealing with information obtained or to be obtained under this Act, a local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction must have regard to the principles relating to information privacy set out in Schedule 5.

             (5)  Nothing in subsection (4) or in Schedule 5:

                     (a)  affects the operation or validity of any decision or other action taken under this Act; or

                     (b)  gives rise to, or can be taken into account in, any civil cause of action; or

                     (c)  creates rights or duties that are enforceable in judicial or other proceedings.

40  Fees

             (1)  A local registration authority of an Australian jurisdiction has power to impose fees in relation to substantive or deemed registration or the continuance of registration arising under this Part, but any such fees may not be greater than are applicable for registration apart from this Part.

             (2)  Nothing in this section prevents the fixing or prescribing of fees referred to in this section under any other law of an Australian jurisdiction, but the fees may not be greater than can be imposed under this section.

             (3)  The local registration authority may impose a condition on substantive or deemed registration arising under this Part to the effect that a person may not carry out activities under registration unless a fee or other payment has been paid, but such a condition may not be imposed unless it corresponds to a requirement attaching to registration apart from this Part.

             (4)  This section does not authorise the imposition of a tax.

41  Formalities requiring personal attendance

             (1)  Neither substantive or deemed registration, nor entitlement to registration, under this Part requires compliance with any statutory or other formalities requiring personal attendance in the Australian jurisdiction concerned.

             (2)  This section applies to formalities that would otherwise have to be complied with before, at or after registration.

42  Saving

                   Nothing in this Part prevents a person from seeking registration or being registered for an occupation under a law apart from this Part.


 

Part 4Exclusions and exemptions

  

43  References to endorsing a proposed regulation

             (1)  For the purposes of this Part, a jurisdiction endorses a regulation if the designated person for the jurisdiction publishes a notice in the official gazette of the jurisdiction setting out and endorsing the terms of the regulation before it is made.

             (2)  However, the making of a recommendation by a Minister to the Governor‑General for the making of a regulation amounts to endorsement of the regulation by the Commonwealth, and the Commonwealth is taken to have endorsed the regulation for the purposes of this Part if the regulation is in fact made.

44  Exclusions

             (1)  This Act does not affect laws of an Australian jurisdiction specified or described in Schedule 1, to the extent that Schedule 1 indicates that they are excluded from the operation of this Act.

             (2)  The Governor‑General may make regulations amending Schedule 1.

             (3)  A regulation may not be made for the purposes of this section unless all of the then participating jurisdictions have endorsed the regulation.

             (4)  However:

                     (a)  if such a regulation merely omits or reduces the extent of an exclusion of a law of a State from Schedule 1, the regulation may be made if the State has endorsed the regulation; or

                     (b)  if such a regulation amends Part 2 of Schedule 1 by substituting or adding a law of a State that relates to a matter referred to in paragraph (a), (b), (c) or (d) of subclause 1(1) of Part 1 of that Schedule, the regulation may be made if the State has endorsed the regulation.

45  Permanent exemptions

             (1)  This Act does not affect the operation of laws of an Australian jurisdiction specified or described in Schedule 2, to the extent that Schedule 2 indicates that they are exempt from the operation of this Act.

             (2)  Such an exemption may be limited or unlimited in its application. If a law is specified or described in Schedule 2 without any limitation, it is taken to be wholly exempt from the operation of this Act.

             (3)  The Governor‑General may make regulations amending Schedule 2.

             (4)  A regulation may not be made for the purposes of this section unless all of the then participating jurisdictions have endorsed the regulation.

             (5)  However:

                     (a)  if such a regulation relates solely to one or more laws specified or described in Schedule 3 and will not take effect within 5 years after the commencement of section 48, the regulation may be made if at least two‑thirds of the then participating jurisdictions have endorsed the regulation; or

                     (b)  if such a regulation merely omits or reduces the extent of an exemption of a law of a State from Schedule 2, the regulation may be made if the State has endorsed the regulation.

46  Temporary exemptions

             (1)  This Act does not:

                     (a)  apply to the sale in an Australian jurisdiction of exempt goods; or

                     (b)  affect the operation of exempt laws of an Australian jurisdiction relating to a particular kind of goods.

             (2)  For the purposes of this section, goods or laws are exempt if the goods are of a kind, or the laws are, for the time being declared by or under an Act or regulation of the jurisdiction to be exempt from the operation of this Act.

             (3)  Any such exemptions have effect only if they are substantially for the purpose of protecting the health and safety of persons in the jurisdiction or preventing, minimising or regulating environmental pollution (including air, water, noise or soil pollution) in the jurisdiction.

             (4)  No such exemption operates (together with the period of any previous exemption) for longer than a period of 12 months or an aggregate period of 12 months.

47  Continuation of temporary exemptions to enable implementation of ministerial agreements

             (1)  The purpose of this section is to create a mechanism to provide an additional period not exceeding 12 months for legislative or other action to be taken to implement a ministerial agreement arising out of consideration of an exemption under section 46. However, this subsection does not provide grounds for invalidating any regulations made for the purposes of this section.

             (2)  This Act does not:

                     (a)  apply to the sale in an Australian jurisdiction of exempt goods; or

                     (b)  affect the operation of exempt laws of an Australian jurisdiction relating to a particular kind of goods.

             (3)  For the purposes of this section, goods or laws are exempt if the goods are of a kind, or the laws are, for the time being declared by regulations under this Act to be exempt from the operation of this Act.

             (4)  The Governor‑General may make regulations for the purposes of this section, but any such regulations may be made only if they have the effect of continuing or reviving, wholly or partly, and with or without modification, the effect of an exemption under section 46.

             (5)  Such a modification may only:

                     (a)  in the case of an exemption relating to goods:

                              (i)  limit the circumstances in which the goods are exempt; or

                             (ii)  provide that the exemption does not apply if certain standards or conditions are complied with in relation to the goods; or

                     (b)  in the case of an exemption relating to a law:

                              (i)  modify the operation of the law while the exemption operates; or

                             (ii)  provide that the exemption does not apply in relation to particular goods if certain standards or conditions are complied with in relation to the goods.

             (6)  The regulations may discontinue any exemption under this section.

             (7)  A regulation may not be made for the purposes of this section unless at least two‑thirds of the then participating jurisdictions have endorsed the regulation.

             (8)  No exemption under this section operates (together with the period of any previous such exemption) for longer than a period of 12 months or an aggregate period of 12 months after the corresponding exemption under section 46 ceases to operate.

             (9)  In this section:

ministerial agreement means an agreement of Ministers of participating jurisdictions made in relation to goods or laws that are the subject of an exemption under section 46.

48  Special exemptions

             (1)  This Act does not affect the operation of laws of an Australian jurisdiction that relate to goods and that are specified or described in Schedule 3, to the extent that Schedule 3 indicates that they are exempt from the operation of this Act.

             (2)  Such an exemption operates for no longer than a period of 12 months after the commencement of this section, but may be extended in whole or in part by the regulations from time to time by one or more further periods each not exceeding 12 months.

             (3)  A regulation may not be made for the purposes of subsection (2) if the exemption has expired or has otherwise ceased to be in force.

             (4)  The Governor‑General may make regulations amending Schedule 3 for the purposes of subsection (2) or (6).

             (5)  A regulation may not be made for the purposes of this section unless at least two‑thirds of the then participating jurisdictions have endorsed the regulation.

             (6)  However, if such a regulation merely omits any matter relating to an exemption that has expired or has otherwise ceased to be in force, the regulation may be made if the Commonwealth has endorsed the regulation.

49  Exemptions relating to occupations

             (1)  This Act does not affect the operation of laws of an Australian jurisdiction that relate to occupations and that are specified or described in Schedule 4, to the extent that Schedule 4 indicates that they are exempt from the operation of this Act.

             (2)  The Governor‑General may make regulations amending Schedule 4.

             (3)  A regulation may not be made for the purposes of this section unless all of the then participating jurisdictions have endorsed the regulation.

             (4)  However, if such a regulation amends Schedule 4 by omitting a law of a State, the regulation may be made if the State has endorsed the regulation.


 

Part 5General

  

50  References to participating jurisdictions

                   For the purposes of this Act, a participating jurisdiction is:

                     (a)  New Zealand, while there is in force an Act of its Parliament that corresponds to this Act; or

                     (b)  the Commonwealth; or

                     (c)  a State (other than a Territory) for which there is in force an Act of its Parliament that refers to the Parliament of the Commonwealth the power to enact this Act, or that adopts this Act, under paragraph (xxxvii) of section 51 of the Commonwealth Constitution; or

                     (d)  a Territory (being the Australian Capital Territory or the Northern Territory) for which there is in force an Act of its legislature that requests the Parliament of the Commonwealth to enact this Act or that enables this Act to apply in relation to it.

51  Application of Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle

             (1)  The Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle and the provisions of this Act may be taken into consideration in proceedings of any kind and for any purpose.

             (2)  Nothing in this Act or the Mutual Recognition Act 1992 prevents a person from relying on the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle in relation to more than one Australian jurisdiction.

52  Machinery provisions regarding limitations etc.

                   In cases where Part 3 provides that conditions or undertakings that apply or are relevant to registration in New Zealand also apply or are relevant to registration in an Australian jurisdiction, they are to be construed with any necessary adaptations, including the following (where appropriate and so far as practicable):

                     (a)  references to New Zealand are to be read as references to the Australian jurisdiction;

                     (b)  references to officers or authorities of New Zealand are to be read as references to the corresponding officers or authorities of the Australian jurisdiction.

53  Determining place of production

             (1)  For the purpose of determining where goods are produced for the purposes of this Act, goods are taken to be produced in New Zealand if the most recent step in the process of producing the goods (including for example processing, harvesting or packaging the goods) has occurred there.

             (2)  Subsection (1) applies even though:

                     (a)  the process of production may be incomplete; or

                     (b)  some steps in the process have not yet been carried out; or

                     (c)  some steps in the process were carried out elsewhere; or

                     (d)  the goods or a component of the goods were imported into New Zealand.

54  Commonwealth regulations for temporary exemptions

                   Without limiting any other power under any other Act, the Governor‑General may make regulations for the purposes mentioned in section 46.


Schedule 1Exclusions

Note:       See section 44.

Part 1Introduction

  

1  Excluded laws

             (1)  The laws specified or described in this Schedule are excluded from the operation of this Act, so far as they relate to:

                     (a)  customs controls and tariffs—but only to the extent that the laws provide for the imposition of tariffs and related measures (for example, anti‑dumping and countervailing duties) and the prohibition or restriction of imports; and

                     (b)  intellectual property—but only to the extent that the laws provide for the protection of intellectual rights and relate to requirements for the sale of goods set out in section 11; and

                     (c)  taxation and business franchises—but only to the extent that the laws relate to taxes imposed on the sale of locally produced and imported goods in a non‑discriminatory way, including, for example, business franchise and stamp duties (States); and

                     (d)  the implementation of international obligations—but only to the extent that the laws implementing those obligations deal with the requirements relating to the sale of goods set out in section 11.

             (2)  The laws specified or described in this Schedule are excluded only to the extent that those laws would be affected by the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle as applying to goods.


 

Part 2Laws

  

2  Customs controls and tariffs (including laws relating to international obligations)

 

Prohibited imports

Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations of the Commonwealth

Commerce (Trade Descriptions) Act 1905 of the Commonwealth

Any other laws of the Commonwealth, to the extent that they provide for the prohibition or restriction of imports and would be affected by the Trans‑Tasman mutual recognition principle as applying to goods.

Tariffs

Customs Tariff Act 1995 of the Commonwealth

Customs Act 1901 of the Commonwealth, Part XVB

Customs Tariff (Anti‑Dumping) Act 1975 of the Commonwealth

3  Intellectual property (including laws relating to the Paris Convention of 20 March 1983 for the Protection of Industrial Property)

 

Patents Act 1990 of the Commonwealth

Trade Marks Act 1995 of the Commonwealth

Designs Act 1906 of the Commonwealth

Olympic Insignia Protection Act 1987 of the Commonwealth

Scout Association Act 1924 of the Commonwealth

Plant Breeder’s Rights Act 1994 of the Commonwealth

Copyright Act 1968 of the Commonwealth

Circuit Layouts Act 1989 of the Commonwealth

Unauthorised Documents Act 1922 of New South Wales

Unauthorized Documents Act 1958 of Victoria

Badge, Arms, Floral and other Emblems of Queensland Act 1959 of Queensland

Armorial Bearings Protection Act 1979 of Western Australia

Unauthorised Documents Act 1916 of South Australia

Unauthorized Documents Act 1986 of Tasmania

City of Canberra Arms Act 1932 of the Australian Capital Territory

Flag and Emblem Act 1985 of the Northern Territory

4  Other international obligations

 

Wildlife Protection (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1982 of the Commonwealth, sections 21 and 22, to the extent that they implement the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora

Hazardous Waste (Regulation of Exports and Imports) Act 1989 of the Commonwealth, sections 12, 14, 15, 17, 18B, 20, 24‑31, 34 and 39, to the extent that they implement the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal 1989

The following laws, to the extent that they implement the Charter of the United Nations (as it relates to the imposition of United Nations sanctions):

Charter of the United Nations Act 1945 of the Commonwealth, section 6

Air Navigation Act 1920 of the Commonwealth, section 26

Banking Act 1959 of the Commonwealth, section 71

Migration Act 1958 of the Commonwealth, subsection 31(3), paragraph 116(1)(g) and section 504

Customs Act 1901 of the Commonwealth, section 50

Protection of Movable Cultural Heritage Act 1986 of the Commonwealth, to the extent that it implements the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) Convention Regulating the International Trade in Cultural Property 1970

The following laws, to the extent that they implement the European Union‑Australia Wine Agreement—Protection of Certain Names and Expressions:

Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation Act 1980 of the Commonwealth, Part VIB and Part VIA (Label Integrity Program)

Australian Wine and Brandy Corporation (Exports) Regulations of the Commonwealth, Parts 3 and 4

5  Taxation and business franchises

 

Laws of a State imposing or providing for the imposition, assessment or collection of taxation, including stamp duties, and providing for business licences.


Schedule 2Permanent exemptions

Note:       See section 45.

                   The laws specified or described in this Schedule are exempt from the operation of this Act.

 

Part 1Laws relating to goods: general

  

1  Quarantine

                   A law of an Australian jurisdiction, including a law relating to quarantine, to the extent that:

                     (a)  the law is enacted or made substantially for the purpose of preventing the entry or spread of any pest, disease, organism, variety, genetic disorder or any other similar thing; and

                     (b)  the law authorises the application of quarantine measures that do not amount to an arbitrary or unjustifiable discrimination or to a disguised restriction on trade between Australia and New Zealand and are not inconsistent with the requirements of the Agreement establishing the World Trade Organisation.

2  Endangered species

                   A law of an Australian jurisdiction, to the extent that it is enacted or made substantially for the purpose of protecting a species or other class of animals or plants from extinction in the jurisdiction and that it prohibits or restricts the possession, sale, killing or capture of animals or plants of that species or other class in the jurisdiction.


 

Part 2Laws relating to goods: specific

  

3  Commonwealth

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations

Fireworks

Customs (Prohibited Imports) Regulations

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Industrial Chemicals (Notification and Assessment) Act 1989

Occupational Health and Safety  (Commonwealth Employment) Act 1991

Road Transport Reform (Dangerous Goods) Act 1995

Trade Practices Act 1974, Division 1A of Part V, to the extent that it deals with child restraints for motor vehicles

Indecent material

Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995

Ozone protection

Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas Management Act 1989 (to the extent that it deals with ozone depleting substances)

Agricultural and veterinary chemicals

Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Act 1994

Agricultural and Veterinary Chemicals Code Act 1994

Other

Imported Food Control Act 1992 (to the extent that it deals with risk categorised food commodities)

Radiocommunications devices

Radiocommunications Act 1992, other than the part of Division 7 of Part 4.1 of that Act that deals with labelling a device

Road vehicles

Motor Vehicle Standards Act 1989

Therapeutic goods

Therapeutic Goods Act 1989

Therapeutic Goods (Charges) Act 1989

4  New South Wales

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Firearms Act 1996
Prohibited Weapons Act 1989

Fireworks

Dangerous Goods Act 1975 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Registered Clubs Act 1976, Parts 10 and 11
Liquor Act 1982, Part 11

Gas appliances

Gas Supply Act 1996, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Act 1966, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Occupational Health and Safety Act 1983

Dangerous Goods Act 1975

Factories, Shops and Industries Act 1962

Fair Trading Act 1987, sections 26, 30, 31 and 38, to the extent that those sections deal with the regulation of child restraints for motor vehicles

Indecent material

Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Enforcement Act 1995

Ozone protection

Ozone Protection Act 1989

Therapeutic goods

Poisons and Therapeutic Goods Act 1966, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

5  Victoria

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Firearms Act 1958

Firearms Regulations 1995

Control of Weapons Act 1990

Control of Weapons Regulations 1990

Fireworks

Dangerous Goods Act 1985 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Dangerous Goods (Explosives) Regulations 1988, Part 8, Division 5

Gaming machines

Gaming Machine Control Act 1991

Gas appliances

Gas Safety Act 1997, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Act 1981, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Dangerous Goods Act 1985

Occupational Health and Safety Act 1985

Indecent material

Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) (Enforcement) Act 1995

Ozone protection

Environment Protection Act 1970, sections 16 and 41 (to the extent that they deal with ozone depleting substances) and paragraph 71(1)(gba)

Therapeutic goods

Drugs, Poisons and Controlled Substances Act 1981, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Therapeutic Goods (Victoria) Act 1994, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

6  Queensland

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Weapons Act 1990

Fireworks

Explosives Act 1952 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Gaming Machine Act 1991

Gas appliances

Petroleum and Gas (Production and Safety) Act 2004, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Poisons Regulation 1973 under the Health Act 1937, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995

Fair Trading Act 1989, sections 81, 83, 85 and 85A, to the extent that those sections deal with the regulation of child restraints for motor vehicles

Indecent material

Classification of Films Act 1991

Classification of Publications Act 1991

Ozone protection

Environmental Protection (Interim) Regulation 1995 under the Environmental Protection Act 1994 (to the extent that it deals with ozone depleting substances)

Therapeutic goods

Poisons Regulation 1973 under the Health Act 1937, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

7  Western Australia

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Firearms Act 1973

Firearms Regulations 1974

Weapons Act 1999

Weapons Regulations 1999

Fireworks

Explosives and Dangerous Goods Act 1961 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Gaming Commission Act 1987

Gas appliances

Gas Standards Act 1972, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Poisons Act 1964, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Occupational Safety and Health Act 1984

Explosives and Dangerous Goods Act 1961

Consumer Affairs Act 1971, sections 23Q, 23R and 23U, to the extent that those sections deal with the regulation of child restraints for motor vehicles

Fair Trading Act 1987, sections 50 and 59, to the extent that those sections deal with the regulation of child restraints for motor vehicles

Indecent material

Censorship of Films Act 1947

Indecent Publications and Articles Act 1902

Video Tapes Classification and Control Act 1987

Censorship Act 1996

Ozone protection

Environmental Protection Act 1986 (to the extent that it deals with ozone protection)

Therapeutic goods

Poisons Act 1964, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

8  South Australia

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Firearms Act 1977

Firearms Regulations 1993

Summary Offences Act 1953, sections 15 and 15A

Criminal Law Consolidation Act 1935, sections 32, 47A and 299A

Fireworks

Explosives Act 1936 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Gaming Machines Act 1992

Gaming Machines Regulations 1993

Gas appliances

Gas Act 1997, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Controlled Substances Act 1984, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Dangerous Substances Act 1979

Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare Act 1986

Indecent material

Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Act 1995

Summary Offences Act 1953, sections 33 and 35

Ozone protection

Environment Protection Act 1993, Part 8, Division 3

Other

Environment Protection Act 1993, Part 8, Division 2 (dealing with beverage containers)

Summary Offences Act 1953, Section 9B

Therapeutic goods

Controlled Substances Act 1984, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

9  Tasmania

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Firearms Act 1996

Fireworks

Dangerous Goods Act 1976 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Gaming Control Act 1993 (to the extent that it deals with gaming machines)

Gas appliances

Gas Act 2000, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Poisons Act 1971, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Dangerous Goods Act 1976

Workplace Health and Safety Act 1995

Indecent material

Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) Enforcement Act 1995

Ozone protection

Environmental Management and Pollution Control Act 1994 (to the extent that it deals with ozone protection)

Other

Living Marine Resources Management Act 1995 (to the extent that it relates to the possession, sale or capture of abalone, crayfish or scallops of a certain minimum size)

Therapeutic goods

Poisons Act 1971, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

10  Australian Capital Territory

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Weapons Act 1991

Fireworks

Dangerous Goods Act 1975 of New South Wales in its application to the Australian Capital Territory (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Gaming Machine Act 1987

Gas appliances

Gas Safety Act 2000, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Poisons and Drugs Act 1978, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Occupational Health and Safety Act 1989

Indecent material

Business Franchise (“X” Videos) Act 1990

Classification (Publications, Films and Computer Games) (Enforcement) Act 1995

Ozone protection

Ozone Protection Act 1991

Therapeutic goods

Poisons and Drugs Act 1978, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

11  Northern Territory

 

Firearms and other prohibited or offensive weapons

Firearms Act 1992

Fireworks

Dangerous Goods Act 1980 (to the extent that it deals with fireworks)

Gaming machines

Gaming Control Act 1993

Gas appliances

Dangerous Goods Act, to the extent that it deals with the regulation of gas appliances

Hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods

Poisons and Dangerous Drugs Act, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of hazardous substances, industrial chemicals and dangerous goods and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act

Dangerous Goods Act

Work Health Act

Indecent material

Classification of Publications and Films Act 1985

Ozone protection

Ozone Protection Act 1990

Therapeutic goods

Poisons and Dangerous Drugs Act, to the extent that it deals with packaging and labelling of pharmaceutical drugs and would be affected by Part 2 of this Act


Schedule 3Special exemptions

  

  

Note:       See section 48.

                   The laws specified or described in this Schedule are exempt from the operation of this Act.


Schedule 4Exempt laws relating to occupations

  

  

Note:       See section 49.

1  Exempt laws

                   The laws specified or described in this Schedule are exempt from the operation of this Act to the extent indicated.

2  Medical practitioners

                   The following laws, to the extent that they deal with the occupation of medical practitioners as referred to in them:

 

Medical Practice Act 1992 of New South Wales;

Medical Practice Act 1994 of Victoria;

Medical Act 1939 of Queensland;

Medical Act 1894 of Western Australia;

Medical Practitioners Act 1983 of South Australia;

Medical Practitioners Registration Act 1996 of Tasmania;

Medical Practitioners Act 1930 of the Australian Capital Territory;

Medical Act 1995 of the Northern Territory.


Schedule 5Privacy of information collected under the Act

Note:       See section 39.

Part 1Interpretation

  

1  Interpretation

                   In this Schedule:

consent means express consent or implied consent.

individual means a natural person.

individual concerned, in relation to personal information or a record of personal information, means the individual to whom the information relates.

personal information means information or an opinion (including information or an opinion forming part of a database), whether true or not, and whether recorded in a material form or not, about an individual whose identity is apparent, or can reasonably be ascertained, from the information or opinion.

record means:

                     (a)  a document; or

                     (b)  a database (however kept); or

                     (c)  a photograph or other pictorial representation of a person;

but does not include:

                     (d)  a generally available publication; or

                     (e)  anything kept in a library, art gallery or museum for the purposes of reference, study or exhibition; or

                      (f)  letters or other articles in the course of transmission by post.

solicit, in relation to personal information, means request a person to provide that information, or a kind of information in which that information is included.

use, in relation to information, does not include mere disclosure of the information, but does include the inclusion of the information in a publication.


 

Part 2Principles

  

2  Solicitation of personal information from individual concerned

                   Where:

                     (a)  a local registration authority collects personal information under this Act; and

                     (b)  the information is solicited by the authority from the individuals concerned;

the authority must ensure that the forms issued to individuals in connection with collecting the information specify:

                     (c)  the purpose for which the information is being collected; and

                     (d)  any person to whom, or any body or agency to which, it is the authority's usual practice to disclose personal information of the kind so collected, and (if known by the authority) any person to whom, or any body or agency to which, it is the usual practice of that first‑mentioned person, body or agency to pass on that information.

3  Storage and security of personal information

                   A local registration authority who has possession or control of a record that contains personal information must ensure:

                     (a)  that the record is protected, by such security safeguards as it is reasonable in the circumstances to take, against loss, against unauthorised access, use, modification or disclosure, and against other misuse; and

                     (b)  that if it is necessary for the record to be given to a person in connection with the provision of a service to the local registration authority, everything reasonably within the power of the authority is done to prevent unauthorised use or disclosure of information contained in the record.

4  Limits on use of personal information

             (1)  A local registration authority who has possession or control of a record that contains personal information that was obtained under this Act for a particular purpose must not use the information for any other purpose unless:

                     (a)  the individual concerned has consented to use of the information for that other purpose; or

                     (b)  use of the information for that other purpose is required or authorised by or under law; or

                     (c)  use of the information for that other purpose is reasonably necessary for enforcement of the criminal law or of a law imposing a pecuniary penalty, or for the protection of the public revenue.

             (2)  Where personal information is used for enforcement of the criminal law or of a law imposing a pecuniary penalty, or for the protection of the public revenue, the local registration authority must include in the record containing that information a note of that use.

5  Limits on disclosure for personal information

             (1)  A local registration authority who has possession or control of a record that contains personal information must not disclose the information to a person, body or agency (other than the individual concerned) unless:

                     (a)  the individual concerned is reasonably likely to have been aware, or made aware under the principle set out in clause 2, that information of that kind is usually passed to that person, body or agency; or

                     (b)  the individual concerned has consented to the disclosure; or

                     (c)  the disclosure is required or authorised by or under law; or

                     (d)  the disclosure is reasonably necessary for the enforcement of the criminal law or of a law imposing a pecuniary penalty, or for the protection of the public revenue.

             (2)  Where personal information is disclosed for the purposes of enforcement of the criminal law or of a law imposing a pecuniary penalty, or for the purpose of the protection of the public revenue, the local registration authority must include in the record containing that information a note of the disclosure.

             (3)  A person, body or agency to whom personal information is disclosed under subclause (1) must not use or disclose the information for a purpose other than the purpose for which the information was given to the person, body or agency.


Notes to the Trans-Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997

Note 1

The Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997 as shown in this compilation comprises Act No. 190, 1997 amended as indicated in the Tables below.

For all relevant information pertaining to application, saving or transitional provisions see Table A.

Table of Acts

Act

Number
and year

Date
of Assent

Date of commencement

Application, saving or transitional provisions

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997

190, 1997

7 Dec 1997

Ss. 1–8: Royal Assent
Remainder: 1 May 1998 (see Gazette 1998, No. S187)

 

Statute Stocktake Act 1999

118, 1999

22 Sept 1999

22 Sept 1999

Ozone Protection and Synthetic Greenhouse Gas Legislation Amendment Act 2003

126, 2003

5 Dec 2003

5 Dec 2003

Administrative Appeals Tribunal Amendment Act 2005

38, 2005

1 Apr 2005

Schedule 1 (items 235, 236): 16 May 2005

Tax Laws Amendment (Repeal of Inoperative Provisions) Act 2006

101, 2006

14 Sept 2006

Schedule 5 (items 166–168) and Schedule 6 (items 5–11): Royal Assent

Sch. 6 (items 
5–11)

Statute Law Revision Act 2007

8, 2007

15 Mar 2007

Schedule 3 (item 25): Royal Assent


From 1 January 2005 the Statutory Rules series ceased to exist and is replaced with Select Legislative Instruments (SLI).  Numbering conventions remain the same, ie Year and Number.

Table of Instruments

Title

Year
and number

Date of notification
in Gazette or FRLI registration

Date of commencement

Application, saving or transitional provisions

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Regulations 1999

1999 No. 60

16 Apr 1999

1 May 1999

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Amendment Regulations 2000 (No. 1)

2000 No. 51

19 Apr 2000

19 Apr 2000

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Amendment Regulations 2001 (No. 1)

2001 No. 75

20 Apr 2001

20 Apr 2001

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997 Amendment Regulations 2001 (No. 1)

2001 No. 221

23 Aug 2001

23 Aug 2001

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Amendment Regulations 2002 (No. 1)

2002 No. 78

18 Apr 2002

18 Apr 2002

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Amendment Regulations 2003 (No. 1)

2003 No. 72

28 Apr 2003

28 Apr 2003

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Amendment Regulations 2009 (No. 1)

2009 No. 65

17 Apr 2009

18 Apr 2009

Trans‑Tasman Mutual Recognition Act 1997 Amendment Regulations 2010 (No. 1)

2010 No. 42

15 Mar 2010

16 Mar 2010

Trans-Tasman Mutual Recognition (Modification of Act) Regulations 2010 (No. 1)

2010 No. 72

19 Apr 2010

20 Apr 2010

Trans-Tasman Mutual Recognition (Amendment of Act) Regulation 2012

2012 No. 303

11 Dec 2012

S. 3: 12 Dec 2012


Table of Amendments

ad. = added or inserted     am. = amended     rep. = repealed     rs. = repealed and substituted

Provision affected

How affected

Part 3

 

Division 5

 

S. 35....................................

am. No. 38, 2005

Schedules

 

Schedule 1.........................

am. No. 118, 1999; No. 101, 2006; No. 8, 2007

Schedule 2.........................

am. Statutory Rules 2000 No. 51; Statutory Rules 2001 No. 221; No. 126, 2003; SLI 2009 No. 65; SLI 2010 Nos. 42 and 72; SLI 2012 No. 303

Schedule 3 ........................

am. Statutory Rules 1999 No. 60; Statutory Rules 2000 No. 51; Statutory Rules 2001 No. 75; Statutory Rules 2002 No. 78; Statutory Rules 2003 No. 72; SLI 2009 No. 65; SLI 2010 No. 72


Table A

Application, saving or transitional provisions

Tax Laws Amendment (Repeal of Inoperative Provisions) Act 2006
(No. 101, 2006)

Schedule 6

5  Application of Schedule 5 amendments

The repeals and amendments made by Schedule 5 apply to acts done or omitted to be done, or states of affairs existing, after the commencement of the amendments.

6  Object

The object of this Part is to ensure that, despite the repeals and amendments made by this Act, the full legal and administrative consequences of:

                     (a)  any act done or omitted to be done; or

                     (b)  any state of affairs existing; or

                     (c)  any period ending;

before such a repeal or amendment applies, can continue to arise and be carried out, directly or indirectly through an indefinite number of steps, even if some or all of those steps are taken after the repeal or amendment applies.

7  Making and amending assessments, and doing other things, in relation to past matters

Even though an Act is repealed or amended by this Act, the repeal or amendment is disregarded for the purpose of doing any of the following under any Act or legislative instrument (within the meaning of the Legislative Instruments Act 2003):

                     (a)  making or amending an assessment (including under a provision that is itself repealed or amended);

                     (b)  exercising any right or power, performing any obligation or duty or doing any other thing (including under a provision that is itself repealed or amended);

in relation to any act done or omitted to be done, any state of affairs existing, or any period ending, before the repeal or amendment applies.

Example 1: On 31 July 1999, Greg Ltd lodged its annual return under former section 160ARE of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936. The return stated that the company had a credit on its franking account and that no franking deficit tax was payable for the 1998‑99 franking year. Under former section 160ARH of that Act, the Commissioner was taken to have made an assessment consistent with the return.

                   Following an audit undertaken after the repeal of Part IIIAA of that Act, the Commissioner concludes that Greg Ltd fraudulently overfranked dividends it paid during the 1998‑99 franking year, and had a franking account deficit for that franking year. As a result, the Commissioner considers that franking deficit tax and a penalty by way of additional tax are payable.

                   The Commissioner can amend the assessment under former section 160ARN of that Act, because item 7 of this Schedule disregards the repeal of that section for the purposes of making an assessment in relation to the 1998‑99 franking year. Item 7 will also disregard the repeal of Division 11 of former Part IIIAA to the extent necessary for the Commissioner to assess Greg Ltd’s liability to a penalty by way of additional tax.

                   Despite the repeal of sections 160ARU and 160ARV, item 9 will ensure that the general interest charge will accrue on the unpaid franking deficit tax and penalty until they are paid.

                   Item 7 will also preserve Greg Ltd’s right, under former section 160ART of that Act, to object against the Commissioner’s amended assessment (including the penalty), since the objection is the exercise of a right in relation to a franking year that ended before the repeal of Part IIIAA.

Example 2: During the 1997‑98 income year, Duffy Property Ltd withheld amounts from its employees’ wages as required by former Divisions 1AAA and 2 of Part VI of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936. The company failed to notify the Commissioner of those amounts, and failed to remit them to the Commissioner.

                   Following an audit undertaken after the repeal of those Divisions, the Commissioner discovers that the withheld amounts have not been remitted. The company’s records are incomplete and the Commissioner is unable to completely ascertain the extent of its liability for the withheld amounts. Under section 222AGA of that Act, the Commissioner makes an estimate of the liability.

                   Item 7 will disregard the repeal of section 220AAZA of that Act (which empowered the Commissioner to recover the amount of the estimate). Even though the estimate is made after the repeal, it relates to amounts withheld before the repeal.

8  Saving of provisions about effect of assessments

If a provision or part of a provision that is repealed or amended by this Act deals with the effect of an assessment, the repeal or amendment is disregarded in relation to assessments made, before or after the repeal or amendment applies, in relation to any act done or omitted to be done, any state of affairs existing, or any period ending, before the repeal or amendment applies.

9  Saving of provisions about general interest charge, failure to notify penalty or late reconciliation statement penalty

If:

                     (a)  a provision or part of a provision that is repealed or amended by this Act provides for the payment of:

                              (i)  general interest charge, failure to notify penalty or late reconciliation statement penalty (all within the meaning of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1936); or

                             (ii)  interest under the Taxation (Interest on Overpayments and Early Payments) Act 1983; and

                     (b)  in a particular case, the period in respect of which the charge, penalty or interest is payable (whether under the provision or under the Taxation Administration Act 1953) has not begun, or has begun but not ended, when the provision is repealed or amended;

then, despite the repeal or amendment, the provision or part continues to apply in the particular case until the end of the period.

10  Repeals disregarded for the purposes of dependent provisions

If the operation of a provision (the subject provision) of any Act or legislative instrument (within the meaning of the Legislative Instruments Act 2003) made under any Act depends to any extent on an Act, or a provision of an Act, that is repealed by this Act, the repeal is disregarded so far as it affects the operation of the subject provision.

11  Schedule does not limit operation of section 8 of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901

This Schedule does not limit the operation of section 8 of the Acts Interpretation Act 1901.