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Quarantine (Plants) Regulations

Authoritative Version
SR 1935 No. 91 Regulations as made
Principal Regulations
Gazetted 19 Sep 1935
Date of repeal 23 Jun 2000
Repealed by Quarantine Regulations 2000

STATUTORY RULES.

1935. No. 91.

 

REGULATIONS UNDER THE QUARANTINE ACT 1908-1924.*

I, THE GOVERNOR-GENERAL in and over the Commonwealth of Australia, acting with the advice of the Federal Executive Council, hereby make the following Regulations under the Quarantine Act 1908-1924.

Dated this eleventh day of September, 1935.

Signature of Isaac A. Isaacs

Governor-General.

By His Excellency's Command,

W. M. HUGHES

Minister of State for Health.

 

Quarantine (Plants) Regulations.

Citation.

1. These Regulations may be cited as Quarantine (Plants) Regulations.

Repeal.

2. Part VII. of the Quarantine Regulations 1927 as amended prior to the date of commencement of these Regulations, is hereby repealed.

Definitions.

3.—(1.) In these Regulations, unless the contrary intention appears—

“diseased” means affected with disease, and includes showing the presence or evidence of any deteriorated or abnormal condition, whether dependent on the presence of or due to the operation, development, growth, or effect of any disease.

“goods” means all kinds of movable property.

“importer” includes owner, consignee or the agent for either.

“pest” includes weed pest as well as insect pest.

“plant” means plants of any kind or size and includes cuttings, slips and buds, the fruit and seeds and all live parts of plants.

“quarantine officer” means a quarantine officer dealing with the quarantine of imported plants, insects and goods.

“Chief Quarantine Officer” means the Chief Quarantine Officer for the Plant Division of Quarantine, dealing with the quarantine of imported plants, insects and goods in any State or Territory.

“the Act” means the Quarantine Act 1908-1924 and if that Act is at any time amended includes that Act as so amended.

__________________________________________________________________________________

* Notified in the Commonwealth Gazette on                                                                     , 1935.

2270.—6/28.8.1935.—Price 1s.


(2.) In these Regulations any reference to a Schedule shall be read as a reference to a Schedule to these Regulations and any reference to a Form shall be read as a reference to a form contained in the First Schedule.

(3.) Strict compliance with the Forms contained in the First Schedule shall not be necessary and substantial compliance shall be sufficient.

Importer’s notice.

4. Any person desirous of landing any imported plants shall give to the quarantine officer at the port of landing a notice and a declaration in accordance with Form Q.-P.l, which shall be printed on pink paper.

Timber—Importer’s notice.

5. No person shall import any timber (either logs or sawn timber) unless he has given to the quarantine officer at the port of entry a notice and declaration in accordance with Form Q.-P.2, which shall be printed on blue paper.

Fees for Inspection.

6.—(1.) The fees specified in the Schedule 2 shall be paid by the importer, for the inspection of imported plants or goods.

(2.) The fees shall be charged according to net weights when fixed by weight, except where otherwise specified, and shall be paid before delivery of the plants or goods.

Fees for fumigation.

7.—(1.) Fees for the fumigation of plants or goods, as specified in Schedule 2, shall be paid by the importer.

(2.) The fees shall be charged according to net weight when fixed by weight, unless otherwise indicated and shall be paid before delivery of the plants or goods.

Permit to deliver.

8. A quarantine officer shall in respect of any imported plants or goods not otherwise provided for under these Regulations and found after careful inspection to be free from disease, issue a permit authorizing delivery of the plants or goods in accordance with Form Q.-P.3, which shall be printed on white paper.

Ordering into quarantine.

9. When any plants or goods have been ordered into quarantine, they shall be immediately removed to a quarantine station or other place approved by the Chief Quarantine Officer in such manner and by such means as the quarantine officer directs.

Delivery into quarantine and interstate transfer.

10. When a quarantine officer has ordered any plants or goods into quarantine he shall issue an order to be served on the importer of the plants or goods, and shall forward to the Customs or other officer in charge, a permit authorizing delivery of the said plants or goods, either to a quarantine station or for inter-State transfer in accordance with Form Q.-P.4, which shall, with the order, be printed on yellow paper.

Packages and packing.

11.—(1.) Any package which has contained any diseased plants or goods may if so directed by the Chief Quarantine Officer, be disinfected or treated as prescribed.

(2.) Any package or packing material connected with any imported plants or goods and consisting of straw, moss, fibre, peat, sawdust, cotton waste, or other material, considered by the quarantine officer likely to introduce disease or pests shall be ordered into quarantine and fumigated, treated or destroyed as directed by the Chief Quarantine Officer.


(3.) Any packing material with which plants or goods arc packed or which accompanies any plants or goods to serve as packing, filling, lining, wrapping, moisture retention, protection or for any other purpose, consisting of soil containing an appreciable admixture of vegetable matter, grass, hay, chaff, hulls of seeds, leaves and twigs of plants, bark or forest litter, shall be ordered into quarantine and forthwith detroyed at the quarantine station or at any place that may be approved by the Chief Quarantine Officer.

Staff obedience.

12. Any person employed in any quarantine station shall obey the orders and carry out the instructions of the quarantine officer in charge and shall assist by every means within his power to prevent any spread of disease or pests.

Release from quarantine.

13. Any plants or goods which have undergone quarantine and treatment and which, after examination by the quarantine officer, are certified by him to be free from disease, may, when all contingent expenses have been duly paid, be removed from the quarantine station on the issue by the quarantine officer to the importer of a certificate of release from quarantine and a permit to remove, in accordance with Form Q.-P.5, which shall be printed on green paper.

Removal of plants from quarantine.

14. Any imported plants or goods which have been treated at a quarantine station or other place approved by the Chief Quarantine Officer in accordance with these Regulations, and released from quarantine, and in respect of which a permit to remove has been issued, shall be removed forthwith by the importer.

Disposal of plants from quarantine.

15. If any plants or goods in quarantine in respect of which a permit to remove has been issued, are not removed and remain unclaimed after a period of seven days, they may be sold or destroyed, or otherwise disposed of as directed by the Director of Quarantine.

Treating and reconditioning plants and goods.

16. Any imported fruit, vegetables (including tubers, bulbs, corms, and rhizomes), nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed, of which any proportion is on inspection by a quarantine officer found to be or suspected of being affected with a disease, or any cereals, pulse, or other seed found on inspection to be mixed with the seed of a proclaimed weed pest, shall be ordered into quarantine, and may, under the supervision of a quarantine officer, be treated as prescribed (or as the Chief Quarantine Officer may direct), or sorted at a quarantine station or other approved place, subject to the following conditions, viz.:—

(a) The fruit, vegetables, nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed shall, as directed by a quarantine officer, be removed to a quarantine station or other approved place.

(b) Any such fruit, vegetables, nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed treated, sorted, or cleaned to the satisfaction of the quarantine officer shall, with the exception of bananas, which may be delivered unpacked, be repacked in clean cases, bags, or other packages, which shall be supplied by the importer, who may then be permitted to take delivery under an order issued by a quarantine officer.


(c) Any case, bag, or other package which has contained any diseased fruit, vegetables, nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed, shall, before delivery, be disinfected as prescribed or to the satisfaction of the Chief Quarantine Officer, or shall be destroyed or otherwise disposed of as ordered by the Director of Quarantine.

(d) Any fruit, vegetables, nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed which have been sorted and are deemed by a quarantine officer to be diseased, may, at the expense of the importer, and if approved by the Minister be re-shipped and exported, or may be destroyed or denaturated as prescribed.

Any seed of a proclaimed or prohibited weed pest shall, at the importer's expense, be destroyed or denaturated as prescribed, or in such manner and at such place as the Chief Quarantine Officer may direct.

(e) The importer shall, unless a quarantine officer decides that the work shall be performed by the Department at the cost of the importer, provide all cartage and labour in connexion with the treatment, sorting, picking over, cleaning, or repacking of any imported fruit, vegetables, nuts, cereals, pulse, or other seed, or goods.

17. Any plant not otherwise provided for in these Regulations shall be retained in quarantine for such period as the Chief Quarantine Officer deems necessary, having regard to the nature and condition of the plant and the place from which it comes.

Infected goods landed in quarantine.

18. Any imported goods found to be infested with a noxious insect or pest or fungus, may if so directed by the Chief Quarantine Officer be landed in quarantine and treated under the supervision of a quarantine officer at a quarantine station or depot or other approved place.

Costs to be paid by the importer.

19. Unless the Chief Quarantine Officer decides that the work shall be performed by the Department, at the cost of the importer, all cartage and labour in connexion with the treatment of such goods shall be provided by the importer.

Fees for supervision.

20. In addition to any other charges a fee for supervision shall be charged, as specified in the Schedule 2 and the minimum fee charged for a period less than one hour shall be that specified in Schedule 2.

Certificates, permits, &c.

21. Any person desirous of landing any imported plant shall, at the time of giving notice as required by regulation 4, furnish also the following declarations, certificates, notices and permits, and comply with the following conditions:—

Bananas from Fiji.

A. In the case of bananas (fruit only) from Fiji, a certificate dated and signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of Fiji, certifying that the bananas are free from disease.

Citrus fruits.

B. In the case of citrus fruits and citrus pips (imported as pips) from any country in which citrus canker does not exist, a certificate dated and signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of the country of origin certifying that—

(a) the fruit was grown in the country specified;


(b) the consignment is free from citrus canker;

(c) the fruit after picking and prior to packing was effectively fumigated with hydrogen cyanide gas or by such other gas or method as is prescribed or approved by the Director of Quarantine.

(d) the pips are clean and free from pulp.

Potatoes.

C.— (1.) In the case of potatoes from any country, a certificate dated and signed by a responsible officer of the Department of Agriculture of the country of origin, identifying the potatoes, stating the quantity, and certifying—

(a) that they were grown in the country named;

(b) that they were packed in the country of origin in clean new packages;

(c) that at the date of issue of the certificate they were free from Phytophthora infestans, Synchytrium endobioticum, Spongospora subterranean and all other serious diseases.

(2.) All potatoes, other than those imported for food purposes, shall, after being landed in quarantine, be planted in a quarantine station and grown through one or more successive generations, until on inspection it is found that the progeny is free from disease. Only potatoes found to be free from disease shall be released from quarantine.

(3.) All bags, crates or other packages containing potatoes shall be marked on the outside with the name of the country of origin and with other marks which will serve to identify the consignment.

Cotton and cotton seed.

22.—(1.) Any person desirous of importing cotton seed for the purpose of extracting oil or for manufacturing purposes, shall comply with the following conditions:—

(2.) Prior to shipment an application for permission to import shall be made to the Minister stating the quantity desired to be imported, the origin of the seed, port of shipment, the treatment (if any) given in the country of origin, the vessel and anticipated date of arrival in Australia.

(3.) A permit to import shall be obtained from the Minister, subject to any conditions which he may think fit to impose.

Cotton from Northern Territory.

23. No person shall import cotton and cotton seed produced in the Northern Territory or in the north-west of Australia north of the parallel of latitude of 26° south, into any other State of Australia or into that part of Western Australia south of that parallel of latitude, unless—

(a) such cotton lint is treated in a vacuum apparatus as prescribed for the treatment of bales of imported raw cotton and

(b) such cotton seed is treated by the dry heat process, at a minimum temperature of 145°F. maintained for a period of one hour, in an approved apparatus.

Hops.

24.—(1.) Any person desirous of importing “hops” for manufacturing purposes, from countries other than those which are known to


be free from downy mildew and mosaic diseases, shall comply with the following conditions:—

(2.) An application for permission to import for special purposes shall be made to the Minister, stating the nature and quantity desired to be imported, the reasons for the importation, the precautions to be taken to procure “hops” free from disease and to ensure delivery without escape.

(3.) A permit to import shall be obtained from the Minister subject to any condition which he may think fit to impose, in addition to the requirement that such hops when imported shall be contained in sealed metal-lined cases, shall be landed in quarantine and opened under the supervision of a quarantine officer, at the factory or brewery for immediate use in the manufacture.

Nursery stock free from soil.

25. Any imported plant, nursery stock, cuttings or other plant parts growing in soil, sand or earth shall be ordered into quarantine and thoroughly freed from such material by being washed in water, or otherwise treated as directed by the Director of Quarantine.

Importation of peanuts.

26.—(1.) Any person desirous of importing peanuts in the shell shall obtain the permission of the Minister, to import.

(2.) In the case of peanuts which are imported, in the shell for roasting or manufacturing purposes, the importer shall obtain the approval of the Director of Quarantine as to the suitability of his premises for storage and roasting and shall comply with the following conditions:—

(a) The peanuts shall be removed from the wharf to premises approved by the Minister for the purpose of storing under bond, roasting or manufacturing;

(b) The peanuts shall not be sold or disposed of or removed from the said premises in a raw or unmanufactured condition with the exception of—

(i) those peanuts which are held in bond in premises approved for storage only, which may be removed to other approved premises, for the purposes of roasting or manufacturing, and

(ii) those peanuts from which the shells have been removed and destroyed at the premises approved for roasting or manufacturing;

(c) Each consignment of peanuts shall be roasted or manufactured within three months from the date of taking delivery, or such other period as approved by the Director of Quarantine;

(d) The peanuts (in the shell) shall, in the process of roasting be heated to a temperature within the roasting chamber of not less than 115° Centrigrade for a period of not less than one hour or other temperature or time approved by the Director of Quarantine;

(e) The treatment of each consignment of peanuts shall be completed before the commencement of the treatment of any subsequent consignment unless on the receipt of written application from the importer, variation for special purposes is approved by the Director of Quarantine;

(f) The importer shall keep a register of every consignment received and the quantity stored under bond, roasted or manufactured and shall furnish weekly to the Chief


Quarantine Officer (Plants) a statement of the quantity so treated, the register being available for inspection by a quarantine officer;

(g) Each bag of peanuts prior to being removed from the wharf, shall be legibly stencilled with the initials of the name of the importer, and with the consecutive number of consignment (e.g.—Consignment No. 1, No. 2, No. 3, &c.);

(h) All empty bags in which the peanuts have been imported, shall, unless disinfected or treated in a manner approved by the Director of Quarantine) be destroyed by burning under supervision as and when directed by a quarantine officer.

Importation of fodder.

27.—(1.) In the case of fodder, hay or chaff (other than fodder, hay or chaff for the use of animals in quarantine, or from New Zealand) which shall not be landed except in compliance with Regulation No. 67 of the Quarantine (Animals) Regulations (S.R. 1935 No. 71) the permit to import shall be reported by the Chief Quarantine Officer (Animals) to the Chief Quarantine Officer (Plants) who shall order such additional treatment to that prescribed under the Quarantine (Animals) Regulations, as he considers necessary to prevent the introduction of plant diseases and pests.

(2.) When notice has been received by the Chief Quarantine Officer (Plants) of a proposed importation of grain to be used or likely to be used as fodder, he shall at once inform the Chief Quarantine Officer (Animals).

Importation of insects.

28.—(1.) Insects and parasites of insects shall not be imported unless—

(a) the importer, prior to shipment, has certified the present state of knowledge concerning the life history, hosts, hyper-parasites (if any) and the economic value of the insects or parasites together with a description of the experiments which it is proposed to conduct and the precautions which are to be taken during the course of the experiments to prevent escape of any insect or parasite;

(b) the importer, prior to shipment, has made an application for permission and has obtained the consent of the Director of Quarantine to that importation;

(c) the importer has given at least two days’ notice of the arrival of the insects or parasites.

(2.) The insects shall remain in quarantine for such time as the Director of Quarantine requires.

Fumigation or other treatments prescribed.

29. The Fumigation or other Treatment of Plants, Goods and Packages.— The following means and methods of treating and fumigating plants, goods and packages in quarantine, or other approved place, are approved and prescribed:—

(a) Fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas, as prescribed for the destruction of coccids, aphids, and similar insects, and for the treatment of fruit, trees, and other hardy plants in foliage, greenhouse plants and deciduous trees and plants in a dormant state infested with such insects, and for cases, bags, or similar packages.


(b) Fumigation with carbon disulphide, as prescribed, for the destruction of colcopterous (chiefly curculionid) and lepidopterous insects, and for the treatment of seeds, unpolished grain, nuts, nutmegs, and seeds and grain of crimson clover, rye, millet, and barley; for bales of raw cotton; for goods and for cases, bags, and similar packages. This method and that described in paragraph (a) of this regulation are not approved for the destruction of ova or larvae, such as those of the codlin moth or fruit fly, imbedded in fruit.

(c) Immersion in a solution of formaldehyde, as prescribed, for potatoes, packages and bulbs.

(d) Immersion in or spraying with Bordeaux mixture, as prescribed for fungous diseases of plants and for packages.

(e) Immersion in a solution of copper sulphate (bluestone) or a mixture, of carbonate of potassium and sulphate of copper in water, as prescribed for fungous diseases, especially of vinos.

(f) Boiling in water, for not less than five minutes for cases, packages, and bags.

(g) Spraying with lime sulphur solution as prescribed for deciduous trees and plants in a dormant state.

(h) Immersion in silver nitrate solution as prescribed for the treatment of tobacco seed, to destroy seed-borne fungi and bacteria liable to cause diseases of the tobacco plant.

(i) Immersion in concentrated sulphuric acid as prescribed for the treatment of cotton seed for planting to combat anthracnose and other seed-borne diseases.

(j) Immersion in hot water as prescribed for bulbs, to combat infection by the narcissus or bulb flies, cel worms and aphids.

(k) Immersion in a hot solution of mercuric chloride (corrosive sublimate) or hot formalin solution as prescribed for the treatment of potatoes, plant roots, banana plants (see under (c) above).

(l) Dry heating as prescribed for broom millet, cotton seed, peanuts and bags.

(m) Fumigation with calcium cyanide dust as prescribed for treatment of bulbs.

(n) Vacuum fumigation with carbon disulphide or other fumigants for the disinfection of raw cotton, seeds, nuts, potatoes, bulbs and other plants, food products, goods packed in cases, bags, or similar packages, and other stored goods and timber.

(o) Fumigation with formalin vapour cold or hot, as prescribed for treatment of seed, hay, straw, grass and bags.

Fumigation with HCN.

30.—(1.) The precise methods of treatment and fumigation shall be as follows:—

A. Fumigation with Hydrocyanic Acid Gas.—Fumigation with hydrocyanic acid gas (HCN) shall be carried out in a chamber or receptacle specially adapted for fumigation purposes, and shall be


maintained for a minimum period of one hour. The procedure shall be as specified hereunder and the generating mixture shall be in the case of—

(i) Fruit trees and hardy plants in foliage—

One ounce (Avoir.) of fused sodium cyanide at least 96 per cent. pure and containing 51 per cent. cyanogen (CN):

One and a half ounces of sulphuric acid of specific gravity not less than 1.83.

Three fluid ounces of water.

Fused potassium cyanide may be substituted for the sodium cyanide, and the equivalent quantity to be used shall be one and a third ounces (Avoir.).

The quantities specified shall be used for each 100 cubic feet of space contained in the fumigating chamber. For the best possible generation of the gas there shall be enough liquid in the generating vessel (glazed earthenware or enamel) to cover the cyanide completely.

With small dosages the acid and water may be increased, making the proportions one ounce sodium cyanide two fluid ounces acid and four fluid ounces water, for each 100 cubic feet of space.

In mixing the chemicals, the water shall be measured and poured into the generator first. The acid shall be measured and slowly poured down the side of the generator and then mixed with the water. The cyanide should be added in the form of small lumps about as large as walnuts and shall not be added in powder form. It should be placed in a carrier so that it may be added to the acid-water mixture by a simple operation from outside the fumigation chamber.

When the Chief Quarantine Officer (Plants) considers it advisable to use calcium cyanide powder or similar preparations of an approved brand, as a substitute for the sodium cyanide and acid method, the quantity used shall be such as will be equivalent to one ounce (Avoir.) of the cyanide compound for each 100 cubic feet of chamber space for hardy plants, bulbs and stored grain, and one ounce per 1000 cubic feet for greenhouse and tender plants.

When liquefied HCN is available, eighteen (18) cubic centimetres of liquid HCN (95/98 per cent. pure) shall be taken as the equivalent of each ounce (Avoir.) of sodium cyanide and in therefore the quantity of liquefied HCN that shall be used for each 100 cubic feet of chamber space.

(ii) Deciduous trees and plants in a dormant state—

Fumigation with a concentration of gas not less than that provided for in the previous section shall be given or the concentration may be slightly increased


by using a greater weight of cyanide per 100 cubic feet, viz.: one and a quarter to one and a half ounces of sodium cyanide as the maximum, with two fluid ounces of acid, and four fluid ounces of water.

(iii) Greenhouse plants—

For the fumigation of greenhouse plants and plants less hardy than dormant stock and bare cuttings, the concentration of gas shall be considerably reduced by using one ounce of sodium cyanide with two fluid ounces of acid and four fluid ounces of water for each 500 cubic feet of air space in the chamber.

(2.) All plants to be fumigated with HCN shall be so placed as to be freely exposed to the gas. At the expiration of one hour or the time required, the doors and vents of the chamber shall be opened for sufficient time to allow all gas to escape before removal of any of the plants.

(3.) No officer or other person shall enter any fumigation chamber until all sensible traces of HCN have disappeared.

Fumigation with CS2.

B. Fumigation with Carbon Disulphide.—(1) Fumigation with carbon disulphide shall be carried out in an air-tight chamber or receptacle which shall be lighted only by means of an incandescent electric light, and then only when no traces of the carbon disulphide are present. All switches in connexion with the electric light shall be fixed outside the fumigating chamber or receptable, and shall be kept locked during the period of fumigation.

(2) For the generation of vapour, carbon disulphide of a specific gravity of 1.29 at 32° F. shall be used, as follows:—

(a) For seeds, grain (crimson clover, rye, millet, and barley excepted), nuts, and nutmegs—three (3) pounds of carbon disulphide to each thousand (1,000) cubic feet of space to be fumigated.

(b) For seeds and grain, of crimson clover, rye, millet, and barley—two (2) pounds of carbon disulphide to each thousand (1,000) cubic feet of space to be fumigated.

(3) All seeds, grain, nuts, and nutmegs to be fumigated shall, if practicable, be spread out in thin, layers so as to be freely exposed to the vapour, and shall be so placed as to be below the sieves or trays specified below, and the fumigation shall be maintained for not less than twenty-four (24) hours. If seeds, grain, nuts or nutmegs cannot be spread out, the amount of carbon disulphide to be used shall be 5 pounds. The packages shall be stacked and fixed so as to leave space of not less than 3 inches between the packages on all sides, and fumigation shall be maintained for not less than thirty-six (36) hours.

(4) The carbon disulphide shall be evaporated, by being poured on a layer of cotton waste placed on a sieve or pervious tray. The layer of cotton shall be not less than 1 inch in thickness and shall be spread evenly over the sieve or tray.

(5) One such sieve or tray, containing at least half a pound of cotton waste, shall be provided for each half (1/2) pound of carbon disulphide required, and the disulphide shall be poured evenly over the cotton waste.


(6) The waste or tray shall be supported or suspended in the upper part of the fumigating chamber, if more than one sieve or tray is used, they shall be so placed as to secure most effectively an even distribution of the fumes and their intimate contact with any seeds, nuts, or nutmegs to be fumigated.

(7) No officer or other person shall smoke or expose any light in or within 20 feet of any fumigating chamber in which carbon disulphide is being used or while any sensible trace of the carbon disulphide remains in such chamber.

C. Immersion in Formaldehyde Solution.—(a) Potatoes—The solution of formaldehyde to be used for the treatment and disinfection of potatoes in quarantine shall be of a strength of two (2) parts by measure of formalin (40 per cent. formaldehyde) to 300 parts of water (equal to two (2) ounces to 15 pints) and the immersion shall continue for 2 hours or the solution shall be prepared by diluting commercial formalin (40 per cent. formaldehyde) 1 part in 120 parts of water (by volume) and used at a temperature of 122° F., the potatoes being immersed for three minutes. The potatoes shall then be removed from the solution and placed on a draining board and covered with a cloth that has been soaked in the hot solution and then slightly wrung. The potatoes shall be left covered for one hour then laid out on a bench in the shade till air dry.

(b) Bags, cases and similar packages for which this treatment is ordered, shall be immersed for a minimum period of two hours.

(c) Immersion for 20 to 30 minutes in a solution prepared by diluting commercial formalin (40 per cent. formaldehyde) one part in 400 parts water is approved as an alternative treatment for bulbs which are suspected of infection by celworms.

D. Immersion in, or Spraying of Plants with, Bordeaux Mixture.—

The Bordeaux mixture prescribed for dipping and spraying imported plants on account of fungous diseases, shall be prepared as set out hereunder either with—

(i) copper sulphate and quicklime, or with

(ii) commercial dry Bordeaux powder.

(a) For this preparation, the formula 6-4-40 shall be used, that is 6 lb. of copper sulphate (CUSO4.5H2O) shall be used with 4 lb. of quick lime (CaO) in 40 gallons of water.

The following test for determining whether Bordeaux mixture is properly prepared is approved and prescribed:—Dissolve 4 oz. of ferro-cyanide of potassium in one pint of water. Half fill a test tube with some of this solution, and add a few drops of the mixture to be tested. Should any brownish discolouration occur, more milk of lime must be added to the Bordeaux mixture, until, on further testing, no discolouration is apparent.

Any tree or plant in quarantine affected with or suspected of being affected with any fungous disease shall be immersed or sprayed with Bordeaux mixture, lime sulphur solution or other mixture, as directed by the Chief Quarantine Officer.


(b) The dry powder of an approved commercial Bordeaux shall be mixed with the amount of water required to produce a mixture equivalent in strength to the 6-4-40 formula, that is one and one-half per cent. of copper sulphate (calculated as the crystalline salt, CuSO4.5H2O).

E. Immersion in a Solution of Copper Sulphate.—Immersion of vines in a two (2) per cent. solution of copper sulphate or in an aqueous mixture of carbonate of potassium and sulphate of copper (producing hydrocarbonate of copper) is approved.

The hydrocarbonate of copper mixture shall be prepared by dissolving (a) one pound of carbonate of potassium in 40 pints of water; (b) two pounds of sulphate of copper in 40 pints of water, and carefully mixing the two solutions in a suitable vessel (e.g., a cask).

Weakly plants, or those showing new shoots, shall, one hour after being dipped, be washed in clean water.

F. Boiling in Water.—Cases, bags, &c, which are of sufficient value to be used second-hand, shall, before being released, be treated for a minimum period of 5 minutes in boiling water, when this method is ordered.

G. Spraying with Lime Sulphur Solution.—The lime sulphur solution for spraying deciduous trees and plants in a dormant state for fungous diseases, scale insects and mites, shall be prepared as described hereunder and the spraying shall be carried out as follows:—

Approved brands of concentrated lime sulphur solution shall be used, diluted according to the table in Schedule 3. The density of the solution shall be obtained by means of a Baumé hydrometer. A stock solution with Baumé reading of 33° equivalent to a specific gravity of 1.295, shall be taken as the standard.

First determine by means of the Baumé hydrometer, the density of the concentrated stock to be used (see left-hand column). Find the figure in the same horizontal line and in the column headed by the dilution required to be prepared. The figure so obtained represents the volumes of water that shall be added to one volume of stock solution, to make the dilution required, e.g., a brand is found by means of the hydrometer to have a density of 31° Bé. In the seventh horizontal line under column 1-15, is the number 14.1, that is, 14.1 volumes of water shall be added to 1 volume of the concentrated stock solution (31° Bé) to produce a 1-15 dilution.

The 1-10 dilution shall be used as the solution in which dormant stock, cuttings and various plant parts in the dormant state shall be dipped, also the solution that shall be used for washing the roots of plants when removing all soil and disinfecting the trimmed roots of imported plants. The following dilutions are approved for the purpose indicated:—Pome fruit trees dormant 1-10, stone fruit trees dormant 1-15, plants in leaf 1-100, except stone fruit trees and tender plants 1-120 dilution.

H. Immersion in Silver Nitrate Solution.—The treatment of imported tobacco seed with silver nitrate solution shall be carried out as follows:—The solution shall be prepared by dissolving nine grains of silver nitrate crystals in one pint of water (equal to 1 part in


1,000), contained in an earthenware, glass, or wooden vessel. For convenience the seed shall be tied in a bag made of material such as butter muslin, and allowed to soak in the above solution for 15 minutes. The bag of seed shall be stirred about to allow air bubbles to escape and ensure thorough wetting of the seed in the bag. At the end of 15 minutes, the bag of seed shall be washed in running water, or in at least six changes of clean water. The seed shall then be removed from the bag, drained, and dried in the shade at room temperature. Any seed which is not immediately delivered, shall be held or stored in a container which has also been disinfected and thoroughly dried.

I. Immersion in Concentrated Sulphuric Acid.—The treatment of cotton seed with sulphuric acid shall be carried out as follows:—Cotton seed imported for planting purposes shall be treated with concentrated sulphuric acid of specific gravity not less than 1.84. The acid shall be placed in an earthenware pot or a wooden vat or tub, and the seed gently poured into it, and stirred up with a wooden paddle. The surface of the seed will become charred. After 2 to 4 hours soaking, the acid shall be drained off and the seed then tipped into a tub containing a large volume of water. This must be done to prevent the development of much heat. After washing with water, the seed shall be thoroughly dried in the shade.

J. Hot Water Treatment.—The treatment of bulbs (with the exception of Iris) to combat infection by larvae of the narcissus flies (the larger and lesser bulb flies—Merodon and Eumerus), bulb mites and bulb eelworms, shall be carried out as follows:—The bulbs contained in wire mesh baskets, shall be completely immersed in water maintained at a temperature of 110° F. If the loss of temperature occasioned when the bulbs are submerged, is quickly restored, one hour’s immersion subsequent to this recovery will suffice for the majority of bulbs, but for larger bulbs (over 2 inches in diameter) up to three (3) hours should be given especially if eelworm infection is suspected. The temperature of the water during treatment should not be allowed to rise above 111.5° F. Very dry bulbs should be given a preliminary soaking in water.

K. Treatment with Mercuric Chloride Solution.—The treatment of potatoes, sugar cane cuttings and banana suckers with mercuric chloride shall be carried out as follows:—

(a) Potatoes.—Prepare the mercuric chloride solution (1 in 1,200) by dissolving at the rate of one ounce in seven and a half gallons of water contained in a wooden or earthenware vessel. The potatoes shall be fully immersed in the solution at 70° F. for one and a half hours, or at 126° F. for two minutes or the potatoes shall be treated for one hour and a half in a solution prepared by dissolving 1 part corosive sublimate in 1,000 parts of water to which 6.6 parts of concentrated hydrochloric acid have been added.

(b) Sugar Cane Cuttings.—Prepare the mercuric chloride solution of a strength of 1 part in 1,000 parts of water. The cuttings shall be given a preliminary soaking for 15 minutes in water maintained at a temperature of 122° F. (50° C). After this preparation, they shall be drained for a moment and transferred to the mercuric chloride solution. At the end of 15 minutes, they shall be removed, drained


for a moment and immersed for two to three minutes in alcohol of 95 per cent. strength. Remove from the alcohol, drain and dry in the shade,

(c) Banana Suckers.—Banana suckers shall be immersed for 2 hours in mercuric chloride solution of a strength of 1 part in 1,200 parts of water, used at ordinary temperature.

L. Dry Heating.—The dry heat treatment for peanuts, cotton seed, broom millet and bags shall be carried out as follows:—

Peanuts.—Any person desirous of importing peanuts in the shell, shall obtain approval for his premises and apparatus as suitable for the purposes of storing and roasting. The peanuts shall be roasted at a temperature of 115°C. (239° F.) maintained for a minimum period of one hour. Variations from this time and temperature for roasting for special purposes may be permitted by the Director of Quarantine, on the written application by the importer for approval.

Cotton Seed.—Cotton seed shall be heated to a temperature of 145° F., and maintained at that temperature for a period of one hour.

Broom Millet.—Broom millet and fibre for broom and brush manufacture shall be heated for 30 minutes at a temperature of 160° F.

Bags. In the case of hags which are fit to be used as second-hand containers, heating to a temperature of 160° F. and maintaining at that temperature for one (1) hour is approved as an alternative to other methods of treating bags (e.g., boiling, fumigating in vacuum with carbon disulphide).

M. Fumigation with Calcium Cyanide Dust.—The following method for the treatment of bulbs is approved and prescribed:—The use of calcium cyanide dust (slowly evolving type) in an airtight box or fumigating chamber is approved. The cyanide shall be scattered in an even thin layer on the floor below the trays on which the bulbs shall be spread, not more, than two bulbs deep in a layer. This method is not approved for use when the air temperature is below 60° F. The calcium cyanide shall be used at the rate of 16 ounces to each 100 cubic feet of space, and exposure to the gas maintained for a minimum period of four hours. (This process is not approved for the treatment of bulbs if the presence of eelworms is suspected.) The bulbs shall be dry and free from soil. They shall be spread out on trays which shall be so well separated that not more than 75 per cent. of the total space of the chamber is occupied.

N. Vacuum Fumigation.—(1.) The use of the vacuum process of fumigation is approved and prescribed for the treatment of the majority of imported goods and plants, including cotton, bulbs, seeds, dried fruits, packed goods, plants, cuttings, scions, bags, wicker goods, matting and timber, &c. The following procedure shall be observed in carrying out this process:—For general treatment a vacuum of 27 inches with carbon disulphide at the rate of 25 pounds per 1,000 cubic feet, a temperature from 60-80º F. and contact for two hours shall be the standard.

(2) For bulbs the following are approved:—Vacuum 29 inches, carbon disulphide 25 to 30 lb. per 1,000 cubic feet, contact for 90 minutes with a maximum of two hours.


(3) Where conditions necessitate the use of hydrogen cyanide in place of carbon disulphide the following formula shall be used:—Vacuum of 25 inches when gas is admitted, 9 ounces (Av.) of sodium cyanide (50 per cent. cyanogen) per 100 cubic feet, 9 fluid ounces sulphuric acid (commercial, 66° Bé. approximately 93 per cent. pure), exposure two hours.

(4) The sodium cyanide shall be prepared, in concentrated solution by dissolving in water at the rate of 200 lb. in 42 imperial gallons. Then 22.5 fluid ounces of this solution, which would contain 9 ounces (Av.) of sodium cyanide shall be used with 9 fluid ounces of sulphuric acid and 9 fluid ounces of water.

(5) The use of liquefied hydrogen cyanide is approved and the dosage shall be 18 c.c. of liquefied HCN (considered equal to one ounce of sodium cyanide by the pot method) per 100 cubic feet, injected into a 27-in. vacuum, the injection being so timed that all the HCN is injected by the time the gauge registers zero. The exposure shall be reckoned from the time this zero is recorded.

(6) In the application of this method, full data shall be recorded—giving vacuum obtained, pressure during contact, period of contact, temperature, dosage, composition of fumigant, treatments before and after fumigation, &c.

31. The Disinfection of Cases, Bags, and Similar Packages.—Cases bags, and similar packages which have been used in the packing of any diseased plants shall, if the Chief Quarantine Officer orders their disinfection, be subjected to the same disinfecting process as is prescribed for the plants packed therein, or shall be immersed in boiling water kept boiling, for a period of not less than five minutes.

32. Depreciation or Injury of Imported Plants.—Any loss occasioned during the removal, handling, or treatment of any imported plant under the direction of a quarantine officer shall be borne by the owner of such plant, and he shall have no claim whatever against the Commonwealth for compensation for any such loss.

33. The Disposal of Plants and Packing Seized under the Quarantine Act.—Any plant or goods, together with any case, package, or packing material seized under the provisions of section 68 of the Act shall be removed to a quarantine station, and if their introduction is not absolutely prohibited under the Act, they may, after due detention and treatment, and provided that, in the opinion of the Chief Quarantine Officer, there is no danger to be apprehended by their introduction, be sold, or otherwise disposed of, as directed by the Director of Quarantine.

34. Entering and Removing Goods from Quarantine Station.—No person shall enter or leave, nor shall any animal, vehicle, or goods of any description whatsoever be taken into or out of a quarantine station for plants without the approval of the quarantine officer in charge, and subject to such conditions as to disinfection as are prescribed, or as the Chief Quarantine Officer directs.

35. Penalty for Breach of Regulations.—Except in those cases where a penalty is specially provided in the Act for any offence against the Act or breach of the Regulations made thereunder, the penalty for a breach of any these Regulations shall be a sum not exceeding Fifty pounds.


THE FIRST SCHEDULE.

 

Q.-P.l.                                                                                                                        Regulation 4.

Commonwealth of Australia.

Quarantine Act 1908-1924.

(Plants.)

IMPORTER’S NOTICE.

To the Quarantine Officer for Plants,

Port of...............................

                                 19       

I hereby give you notice that I desire to remove from the vessel......................... the following plants,(1) or goods as per schedule below.

These plants were grown at (2)................................................................ and shipped at the port of         

The plants/goods are consigned to.............................

Brands or Marks.

Quantity.

Description of Plants or Goods.

Fees.

Number of Packages.

Weight or Measurement.

Inspection, Fumigation and Supervision Fees to be shown separately under letters I. F. & S. and Rates in each case to be specified.

 

 

 

 

Rates I. F. S.

£

s.

d.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total £..........

 

 

 

I declare that to the best of my knowledge and belief the above particulars are true and correct, and that no other plants/goods subject to quarantine of which I am the consignee/importer/agent, (3) have arrived by the said vessel.

(Signature).......................................

Receipt No.................

 

(1) “Plants” means trees or plants, and includes cuttings and slips of trees and plants, and all live parts (for example: seeds, unpolished grain, nuts and nutmegs) of trees or plants, and fruit.

(2) Name of place and country.

(3) Cross out the two designations not required.

 

Q.-P.2.                                                                                                                       Regulation 5.

Commonwealth of Australia.

Quarantine Act 1908-1924.

(Plants.)

TIMBER—IMPORTER’S NOTICE

To the Quarantine Officer for Plants,

Port of...............................

                                 19       

I hereby give you notice that I desire to remove from the vessel.................... which arrived

or will arrive at.............................. on............................ 19.... , and is berthed or is to be berthed

at..................................... the timber described in the

 


The First Schedulecontinued.

schedule hereunder. The country of origin is............................... The timber was shipped from the

port of............................... and is consigned to.................................

Brands or Marks.

Quantity.

Variety and Description of Timber.

Fees.

Number of Pieces.

Measurement, super. feet.

Rate.

Amount.

 

 

 

 

 

£

s.

d.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total £......

 

 

 

I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, the above particulars are true and correct, and that no other timber subject to quarantine of which I am the consignee/importer/agent, has arrived by the said vessel.

(Signature).......................................

Permit No...................

 

Q.-P.3.                                                                                                                       Regulation 8.

Commonwealth of Australia.

Quarantine Act 1908-1924.

(Plants.)

PERMIT TO DELIVER PLANTS/GOODS.

To the............................. Officer at...............................

                          19         

Please deliver, on payment of, or on production of the receipt for payment of the undermentioned inspection fees, the following plants/goods ex ss..................................... from....................................

Imported by                         

Description

Number.

Brands.

Consignee.

Fees.

£

s.

d.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total £.......

 

 

 

(Signature).........................................

Quarantine Officer.

Port of...................................


 

The First Schedulecontinued.

Q.-P.4.                                                                                                         Regulations 10 and 28

Commonwealth of Australia.

Quarantine Act 1908-1924.

(Plants.)

PERMIT TO DELIVER PLANTS/GOODS/INSECTS INTO A QUARANTINE STATION OR FOR INTER-STATE TRANSFER.

To the............................. Officer at...............................

                          19         

Please allow the following plants/goods/insects (as per schedule below), which arrived per ss.   from    to be removed in quarantine from the vessel,

for delivery to the Quarantine Station

for Inter-State transfer

at

per

.....................................

The plants/goods/insects have.............................. been inspected at...........................

Fees shall be payable at the port of................................

Description.

Number.

Brands.

Consignee.

 

 

 

 

(Signature).......................................

Quarantine Officer.

Port of........................................

 

Q.-P.5.                                                                                                                     Regulation 13.

Commonwealth of Australia.

Quarantine Act 1908-1924.

(Plants.)

RELEASE FROM QUARANTINE AND PERMIT TO REMOVE PLANTS/GOODS.

                          19         

To M....................................

The plants/goods imported by.......................... which arrived per ss........................... from         and are particularized in the schedule below, having been treated in quarantine and subsequently found free from disease are hereby released from quarantine, and may be removed

from the quarantine station on production to....................................... of receipts of payment of inspection, fumigation and other quarantine charges.

Treatment, &c.

Description.

Number.

Brand.

@

£

s.

d.

To Treatment of...........

Fruit......................

 

 

 

 

 

 

,,          ,,        ,, .............

Plants....................

 

 

 

 

 

 

,,          ,,        ,, .............

Goods...................

 

 

 

 

 

 

,,          ,,        ,, .............

Packages and cases

 

 

 

 

 

 

„ Assortment of

Fruit......................

 

 

 

 

 

 

„ Supervision................

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total ...................................

 

 

 

(Signature).......................................

Quarantine Officer.

Port of.............................

Receipt No                 


THE SECOND SCHEDULE.

 

FEES.

No. of Fee.

Matter in respect of which Fee is payable.

Fee.

 

 

s.

d.

 

Inspection.

 

 

1

(a) For growing plants generally (not elsewhere included) and plants (including parcels of seeds of 1 lb. or more in weight) arriving by parcels post or in passengers’ luggage—

(i) Seeds, bulbs, nuts or similar plants—Each 10 lb. or part thereof             

1

0

2

(ii) Other plants—

For the first 50 or part thereof..................................................................................

1

6

3

Each 50 of the part 51 to 300 inclusive.................................................................

0

6

4

Each 50 of the part over 300...................................................................................

(b) Cuttings, stocks and scions, slips and grafts—

0

3

5

Per 1,000 or part thereof up to 5,000...............................................................................

1

0

6

Per 1,000 or part thereof for any additional quantity..................................................

(c) Fresh fruit—

0

6

7

Bananas in bunches—per bunch.....................................................................................

0

1

8

Fruit in cases or packages—

Cases not exceeding one cental gross weight—per case or package...............

0

2

9

Cases exceeding one cental gross weight—per cental or part thereof.............

0

2

 

(d) Dried fruit—

(i) E.g., raisins, currants, prunes, figs, dates, sultanas, apples (other than in air-tight receptacles or similar intact packages)—

 

 

10

First 100 packages or part thereof—per package................................................

0

2

11

For the part 101 to 300 inclusive—per package...................................................

0

1

12

For the part 301 to 500 inclusive—Each 10 packages........................................

0

6

13

For the part 501 to 1,000 inclusive—Each 10 packages....................................

0

2

14

For the part over 1,000—Each 10 packages.........................................................

(ii) Figs, raisins, sultanas, dates, &c, packed in small boxes or cartons which are enclosed within a larger case—

0

1

15

Each dozen boxes or cartons or part thereof, when each carton does not exceed 8 oz. in weight ................................................................................................................................

0

16

Each dozen boxes, when each carton is over 8 oz. but not over 1 lb...............

0

l

17

Each dozen boxes, when each carton is over 1 lb. but not over 8 lb................

0

2

 

(e) Cereals, pulses, vegetable and other seeds—

In bulk or in wholesale packages—

 

 

18

First 100 centals—per cental....................................................................................

0

2

19

Part from 100 to 400 centals—per 20 centals or part thereof...........................

0

6

20

Part over 400 centals—per 20 centals or part thereof.........................................

(f) Nuts—

0

2

21

Coco-nuts—

Per cental or part thereof for first 20 centals.........................................................

0

1

22

Part above 20 centals for each 20 centals or part thereof..................................

Nuts such as walnuts, filberts, chestnuts, brazil, barcelona, and pecan nuts—

0

3

23

For first 100 centals—per cental..............................................................................

0

2

24

For part in excess of 100 centals—per cental.......................................................

0


 

The Second Schedulecontinued.

No. of Fee.

Matter in respect of which Fee is payable.

Fee.

 

 

s.

d.

 

Inspectioncontinued.

 

 

 

(g) Vegetables, bulbs, e.g., onions, potatoes, corns, rhizomes, and tubers generally—

 

 

25

For first 100 centals—per cental.......................................................................................

0

2

26

For part above 100 centals—per 10 centals or part thereof .......................................

0

2

 

(h) Parts of plants, partially treated in preparation for foodstuffs or goods, such as coffee beans (hulled), cocoa beans, chicory, bran, pollard, ginger (dry), mace, nutmegs, pimento, sago, tapioca root (dried), turmeric—

 

 

27

For the first 100 centals—per cental................................................................................

0

2

28

For part from 100 centals to 400 centals—per 20 centals or part thereof................

0

5

29

For part over 400 centals—per 20 centals or part thereof...........................................

0

2

30

Other parts of plants partially treated in preparation for foodstuffs or goods, such as cassia chips, cinnamon, copra, cloves, flour, sharps, hops, kola nuts, lentils (split), rice, tonquin beans, vanilla beans, vegetables (dried), &c.—not included in the preceding group under sub-paragraph (h) shall be charged at the same rates as for Nos. 27, 28 and 29, when the Chief Quarantine Officer considers inspection necessary      

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

2

0

5

0

2

31

(i) Plants (including parcels of seeds under 1 lb. in weight) arriving by parcels post or in passengers’ luggage 

Free

32

Unless the Chief Quarantine Officer is of the opinion that examination or other action is necessary, in which case the fee shall be per parcel.................................................................................

1

0

33

(j) Plants from Norfolk Island.........................................................................................................

Free

 

(k) Hay (including meadow hay) chaff or straw from New Zealand—

 

 

34

For the first 100 tons—per ton............................................................................................

1

0

35

For the part in excess of 100 tons in any single consignment—per ton......................

0

3

 

(l) Timber—

(1) Sawn and dressed or partly dressed, shaped, cut to size, wholly or partly made up, or prepared in any way or cut to size undressed, which in the opinion of the Chief Quarantine Officer requires inspection —

(i) if in boxes, cases, crates or bundles, with the exception of box shooks—

 

 

36

For packages containing not more than 200 pieces per package.......

0

1

37

For packages containing over 200 pieces, but not more than 500 pieces—per package..........................................................................................................

0

2

38

For packages containing over 500 pieces—per package.....................

0

3

39

(ii) box shooks, other than those exempt under No. 42—per 100 packages....

0

6

40

(iii) if not in boxes, cases, crates or bundles—per 1,000 superficial feet or lineal feet as stated in the consignment..................................................................................................

0

1

41

(2) Sawn, other than that described in the preceding sub-paragraph (1) Nos. 36 to 40 inclusive and excepting that described in the two following groups, Nos. 42 and 43, under this sub-paragraph—

(i) per 1,000 superficial feet or part thereof............................................................

0

6


 

The Second Schedulecontinued.

No. of Fee.

Matter in respect of which Fee is payable.

Fee.

 

Inspectioncontinued.

s.

d.

 

(l) Timber—continued.

(ii) that imported from New Zealand, Canada, United States of America and that from Europe and commonly known as “Baltic” (but excluding box shooks made from these timbers), which in the opinion of the Chief Quarantine Officer requires inspection—

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42

per 1,000 superficial feet or part thereof.........................................

0

2

43

(iii) box shooks made from the timbers described in the last sub-group, “Baltic” &c.    

 

 

 

Free

44

(3) Logs, spars in the rough and sawn timber of a size exceeding 180 square inches in cross section—per log, spar or piece.......................................................................................................

 

 

 

0

6

 

(4) Bamboo, rattan, wicker, cane, whole or split, and not made into goods—

 

 

45

(i) if consigned in boxes, cases, crates or bundles per ten packages...................

0

1

46

(ii) if not consigned, in boxes, cases, crates or bundles per 100 canes, bamboo poles or rods      

 

 

 

0

1

 

(5) Tea-chests, desiccated coco-nut chests, or other chests, boxes or containers which in the opinion of the Chief Quarantine Officer require inspection—

 

 

 

 

 

47

For the first ten or part thereof...........................................................................

0

3

48

For each additional ten or part thereof up to 100..........................................

0

2

49

For each additional ten or part thereof over 100............................................

0

1

50

(6) Lounges, settees, couches, tables and chairs, or other furniture made of wood, bamboo, wicker, cane or mixtures of these, which in the opinion of the Chief Quarantine Officer require inspection; incubators, brooders and foster mothers; new casks and vats—each...........

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

0

1

51

Any separate inspection of imported plants or goods under Regulation 6A minimum fee.

 

 

 

1

0

 

Fumigation Fees.

 

 

 

(a) For fumigation with hydrogen cyanide (gas)—

 

 

 

(i) Fruit—

 

 

52

Per case not exceeding bushels, or for bananas not exceeding 1 cental gross weight.    

 

 

 

0

2

53

Per case of more than 1¼ bushels or of bananas exceeding 1 cental gross weight         

 

 

 

0

3

 

(ii) Growing plants, cuttings, stocks, scions—

 

 

54

Per square foot or part thereof of floor space occupied by the packages containing the plants  

 

 

 

0

4

55

(iii) Seeds and cereals—Per bag .........................................................................................

0

6

 

(b) For fumigation with carbon disulphide—

 

 

(i) Nuts, dried fruits, cocoa beans, coffee beans, dates, figs, raisins, sultanas, tapioca root, &c., packed in bags or cases—

 

 

56

For the first 25 bags or cases—Per bag or case .....................................................

0

9

57

For the part over 25 bags and up to 100 cases—

Each bag or case...............................................................................................

0

4

58

For the part over 100...................................................................................................

0

3

 

(ii) Cereals, pulse, and other seeds—

 

 

59

For the first 100 bushels in any consignment—Each 10 bushels or part thereof

1

0

60

For the part over 100 bushels but not exceeding 500 bushels—Each 10 bushels or part thereof

 

 

 

0

9


 

The Second Schedulecontinued.

No. of Fee.

Matter in respect of which Fee is payable.

Fee.

 

 

s.

d.

 

Fumigation Feescontinued.

 

 

 

(b) For fumigation with carton disulphide—continued.

 

 

61

For the part exceeding 500 bushels—Each 10 bushels or part thereof .............

0

6

 

(iii) Timber sawn and dressed or partly dressed, shaped, cut to size, wholly or partly made up or finished or prepared in any way, or out to size undressed—

 

 

 

Packed in boxes, crates or bundles—

 

 

62

For the first 25 packages of a consignment—Per package.........................

0

9

63

For the part 26 to 100 packages—Per package............................................

0

4

64

For the part over 100 packages—Per package..............................................

0

3

65

Not packed in boxes, cases, crates or bundles—

 

 

 

Per 1,000 superficial feet...................................................................................

1

0

66

Disinfection (only) of bales of raw cotton when carried out by the Department of Health—Per bale              

2

0

67

Labour incurred in emptying, spreading, bagging, &c., seeds, cereals, nuts, &c., which have been fumigated loose............................................................................................................................................

Current labour rates

68

Minimum charge for fumigation with hydrogen cyanide or with carbon disulphide............

1

0

69

For the supervision of sorting, cleaning, repacking, or retreatment of fruit, vegetables, nuts, cereals, pulse, bulbs, tubers, dried fruits or goods, if carried out by the importer under the supervision of a quarantine officer—Per hour or part thereof...........................................................................................................

3

0

 

Supervision by quarantine officer of fumigation or other quarantine procedure—

 

 

70

Per hour....................................................................................................................................

3

0

71

Minimum charge for period less than one hour................................................................

1

0

THE THIRD SCHEDULE.

 

TABLE FOR USE IN DILUTING CONCENTRATED LIME SULPHUR SOLUTIONS.

Density of Concentrated Stock.

Volumes of Water to be added to One Volume of Concentrated Stock Solution of Lime Sulphur.

Degrees Baumé.

Specific Gravity.

1-10.

1-15.

1-20.

1-30.

1-40.

1-80.

1-100.

1-120.

25°........

1.208

7.6

11.4

15.2

22.7

30.3

60.6

75.8

90.9

26°........

1.218

7.9

11.8

15.8

23.6

31.5

63.0

78.8

94.5

27°........

1.229

8.2

12.3

16.4

24.5

32.7

65.5

81.8

98.2

28°........

1.239

8.5

12.7

17.0

25.5

33.9

67.9

84.8

101.8

29°........

1.250

8.8

13.2

17.6

26.4

35.2

70.3

87.9

105.5

30°........

1.261

9.1

13.6

18.2

27.3

36.4

72.7

90.9

109.1

31°........

1.272

9.4

14.1

18.8

28.2

37.6

75.2

93.9

112.7

32°........

1.283

9.7

14.5

19.4

29.1

38.8

77.6

97.0

116.4

33°........

1.295

10.0

15.0

20.0

30.0

40.0

80.0

100.0

120.0

34°........

1.306

10.3

15.4

20.6

30.9

41.2

82.4

103.0

123.6

35°........

1.317

10.6

15.9

21.2

31.8

42.4

84.8

106.1

127.3

 

By Authority: L. F. Johnston, Commonwealth Government Printer, Canberra.